Celebrating Teaching and Learning – Honorarium Finalists & Schedule – May 19th

There is still time to register!  The Celebrating Teaching and Learning conference will be held virtually on May 19th with Webex. The event is FREE!

name tags from a previous conference

Why should you attend?

  • To recognize innovations in teaching and learning by members of the Warhawk community!
  • Spring semester grades are due the day before.
  • You can attend from anywhere with internet access.
  • It’s Free!

Morning Session (Equity in the Classroom)

TimeDescription
10:00 AM to NoonThe conference will start with an Equity in the Classroom workshop led by the LEARN Center Equity Ambassadors. The workshop will begin with a panel discussion followed by interactive breakout sessions focused on practices that you could use to create a more equitable and inclusive learning environment. For more on the Equity Ambassadors: https://www.uww.edu/learn/equityambassadors

Lunch Break
Noon to 1:00 PM

Afternoon Session (Celebrating Teaching and Learning)

TimeDescription
1:00 PMWelcome and Opening Remarks
1:10 PMTeaching with Technology: Organization, Assessment, Equity, and Inclusion. Erin Bauer, Assistant Professor of Musicology.
1:40 PMUsing adaptive learning software in an introductory statistics course to improve student engagement and achievement. Meg Waraczynski, Professor of Psychology.
2:05 PM – 2:20PMBreak
2:20 PMTechnology to Engage Learners: A New Way of Teaching! Jeannine Rowe, Professor of Social Work.
2:50 PMA Focus on the Good: Technology to Improve Engagement, Equity, and Best Practices in Post-COVID Learning. Steven Girard, Associate Professor of Chemistry.
3:20 PMInnovator Winner Announced and Closing Remarks

Teaching with Technology: Organization, Assessment, Equity, and Inclusion

Erin Bauer, Assistant Professor of Musicology

Erin Bauer, Assistant Professor of Musicology

I typically teach a handful of general education courses in the online format. However, prior to the pandemic, I did not consider teaching my music history survey courses online. With the onset of COVID-19, my music history survey courses, general education offerings, and upper-division electives all shifted online. As such, I made a number of modifications to the structure and content. While these changes were initially made out of necessity, many have served my students better than anticipated and will continue in face-to-face offerings. This presentation will focus on the use of technology in my music history survey courses, but these techniques function similarly across all my offerings. In particular, we will explore the organization of materials on Canvas, alterations to learning resources in the online setting, gating of content to promote student accountability, effective assignments and assessments, and incorporation of provocative issues of racism, classism, and sexism in an inherently exclusionary online curriculum.

Presentation Description:

Organization of Course Materials:
Even in my face-to-face classes, I typically rely on the LMS. However, in shifting fully online, this method of structuring each course became even more important. I break each course into content-based modules. Each module consists of a “page” providing a brief introduction to the material and learning objectives, my own lecture video, additional learning materials, and a list of assignments. I also expanded my learning materials to include supplemental readings, videos, and podcasts. These provide a variety of methods for students to access the material, but also introduce more provocative issues of racism, sexism, and classism within the Western canon. To hold students accountable, I “gate” the content. When students first log into the course at the beginning of the semester, they see only a “Welcome” module, consisting of my video introduction, the syllabus, and a discussion board with short, personal introductions. Once they view/complete these items, subsequent modules become available. The content page at the start of each module is followed by short multiple-choice quiz on the learning materials for the week. Students must complete it with 100% accuracy before subsequent assignments become available.

Effective Assignments and Assessments:
Prior to the pandemic, assignments in my music history survey courses closely resembled those in my own undergraduate career. In moving the courses online, I shifted assignments to focus on critical thinking. For each module, students now listen to musical examples and write a reflection on the discussion board, respond to a more provocative discussion prompt centered on issues like the inherent whiteness and maleness of the canon, the narrative of composer as genius, and the importance of representation, and complete an examination consisting of short essay prompts.

Equity and Inclusion:
The technology-based alterations to these classes have increased equity and access to the curriculum. Beyond changes to curricular content to address issues of diversity, tokenism, and power within the Western music canon, alternative learning materials, free and open-access resources, flexible synchronisms, and student choice of assessment modality allow students from diverse backgrounds to interact with their educations in ways that are most approachable, engaging, and productive for individual circumstances.


Using adaptive learning software in an introductory statistics course to improve student engagement and achievement.

Meg Waraczynski, Professor of Psychology

This presentation will introduce audience members to using Realizeit’s adaptive learning platform to support student success. Adaptive learning software allows students to achieve mastery at their own pace. In my introductory statistics course the Realizeit platform takes the place of a textbook. Students learn basic content interactively and with immediate feedback on their comprehension. Students who struggle can be directed to extra support while students with existing knowledge can skip exposition they do not need. Realizeit affords several advantages. For instance, the instructor gets information about which concepts or skills need more exposition and also about which students are struggling with what material. Students can spend more in-class time working with peers to practice new skills via the analysis and interpretation of authentic datasets. Students may work on lessons until they achieve a target mastery level. Lessons remain available for review throughout the semester, with novel questions presented at each iteration. Attendees will get a brief introduction to creating Realizeit lessons and will see what a typical lesson looks like to students.

Presentation Description:

  1. Attendees will learn that mastering adaptive learning software for their courses need not be intimidating.
  2. Attendees should see that adaptive learning software offers substantial and numerous advantages to them and their students.
  3. Attendees should gain the background to start thinking about how adaptive learning software might apply to their own courses.

Technology to Engage Learners: A New Way of Teaching!

Jeannine Rowe, Professor of Social Work

Jeannine Rowe, Professor of Social Work

Using technology has evolved significantly in the last two decades. Wherein the past technology was touted as a substitute for teaching traditional face-to-face classes, today it is viewed as a platform to transform the learning experience. This presentation will include a first-hand account of using technology in teaching over the past 20 years. As part of this account, the presenter will share her perspective as a social science educator on the evolution of technology, and share examples of how she utilizes technology to actively engage learners and transform the learning experience in an online format. Unique to this presentation will be the sharing of activities that use technology to promote positive skill growth for learners enrolled in social, behavioral, and allied health professional training programs.

Presentation Description:

This session will be of interest to instructors who want to engage students as active and creative learners using technology. Because the presentation will include examples of activities using technology in online and social and behavioral health arenas, it may be particularly attractive for instructors in similar venues. The activities to be shared will be presented within the context of PICRAT, which is a technology integration model that requires consideration of the student’s relationship to technology and the instructor’s use of it, in designing activities/lessons with technology to maximize student engagement and achievement. Sample activities to be shared include those that foster interpersonal skills, promote written and oral communication skills, and enhance group facilitation skills.

 Individuals who attend this presentation will:

  • Recognize the value of using a framework, such as PICRAT to develop activities/lessons that integrate technology
  • Identify the how activities using technology can be both creative and transformative
  • Classify how different activities/lessons fit within the PICRAT framework

The presentation will be engaging and prompt attendees to rethink how they might develop activities/lessons using technology. There will be time for attendees to ask questions and engage with the presenter and others.


A Focus on the Good: Technology to Improve Engagement, Equity, and Best Practices in Post-COVID Learning

Steven Girard, Associate Professor of Chemistry

Steven Girard, Associate Professor of Chemistry

Our sudden move to remote learning one year ago laid bare the systemic challenges facing all institutions of higher education. While the downsides of online instruction became apparent from our sudden shift online, so did unexpected benefits. In this talk, we will focus on the good: increased flexibility in managing time and work/life balance; accessibility and communication; and the learning and leveraging of new technologies to improve student outcomes. These benefits of online instruction will persist well beyond the pandemic, and in many ways have already become ingrained. I will detail my use of a variety of technologies to improve student-student and student-instructor classroom community; linking instructors to technology best practices; and ways to improve accessibility and equity of online/remote teaching resources.

Presentation Description:

This talk will highlight:

  1. Technology to build a sense of community and belonging in the classroom via trivia games.
  2. Online discussion sessions to facilitate in higher order learning and “un-Google-able” exam questions.
  3. Technology to build community and best practices amongst faculty and staff.
  4. Adaptive learning and online textbooks: growth mindset, positive study habits while improving accessibility and equity via Cerego and Open Educational Resources (OERs).

Call for proposals: 2021 LTDC Virtual Showcase

Instructors and staff are invited to participate in the 2021 LTDC Virtual Showcase: Transforming the Future of Education to be held Tuesday, June 15 and Wednesday, June 16, 2021. We are accepting two types of proposals: pre-recorded, asynchronous “TechTalk” videos and more traditional conference-style presentations. Proposal submission deadline: Friday, April 16, 2021

LTDC logo
Transforming the Future of Education

TechTalks: Technology administrators, instructional designers, and instructors are invited to create brief (5-15 minutes) pre-recorded videos explaining how to use a tool or certain applications of the tool. The focus of the TechTalk should be training or demonstration.

Traditional conference presentations: Sessions will be 30 minutes and will consist of 20 minutes of presentation and 10 minutes of Q&A. Presentation materials and proceedings are welcomed and will be shared on the LTDC Virtual showcase website.

This year’s LTDC Virtual Showcase will include three tracks. Proposals from instructional designers, instructional technologists, faculty and instructors are invited around the following tracks:

  • Student Experience and Success: This track explores ways in which the student experience has changed within the new learning modalities due to the addition of equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) practices, Universal Design for Learning (UDL) practices and accessibility practices. How has shifting from face-to-face instruction to multiple modalities impacted the student experience or their success?
  • Online Instructional Pedagogy: This track explores how online education has impacted course design and layout, synchronous/asynchronous techniques for engagement and motivation, group work, activity or assessment creation, or other learning designs and lessons learned. What instructional challenges have you overcome as you have learned about online instruction? What are some key takeaways or lessons learned over the past year that you would like to continue to develop?
  • Leveraging Learning Technology: This track explores the use of various tools, technologies and teaching strategies used to enhance student learning, create efficiencies, or promote engagement. How have you used certain technology or tools to enhance your teaching and the student experience? What tools have intentionally made the online student experience more equitable, efficient or engaging?

Proposals may be submitted for presentations or TechTalks. If you are interested in presenting on multiple topics, please fill out the online submission form for each topic. Proposals will be reviewed by the LTDC Virtual Showcase Planning Committee, and all participants will be notified of participation within the showcase on Monday, May 3, 2021.
https://uwsystemadmin.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_508e664pbXufxC6

Questions – Please contact LTC@uww.edu

Celebrating Teaching and Learning – Register Now!

After a one-year hiatus, the Celebrating Teaching and Learning conference is back in an online format on Wednesday May 19th, 2021. The day will start with a workshop led by the UW-W Equity Ambassadors followed by presentations from the Cisco/Presidio Teaching with Technology honorarium winners.

Registration is available at: Celebrating Teaching and Learning Event Registration.

Morning Session – 10 AM to Noon
The conference will start with an Equity in the Classroom workshop led by the LEARN Center Equity Ambassadors. The workshop will begin with a panel discussion followed by interactive breakout sessions focused on practices that you could use to create a more equitable and inclusive learning environment. For more on the Equity Ambassadors: https://www.uww.edu/learn/equityambassadors

Afternoon Session – 1 PM to 4 PM
The afternoon will consist of virtual presentations from the 5 finalists for the 2021 Cisco/Presidio Teaching with Technology Honorarium. The session will wrap up by announcing the individual selected as the 2021 Teaching with Technology Innovator.

All sessions will be held via Cisco Webex. Please contact us as soon as possible for any accessibility accommodations.

Please contact the Learning Technology Center if you have any questions about the event.

Canceled – 2020 Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference

We regret to inform you that we have decided to cancel the 2020 Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference due to the many “new normals” resulting from COVID-19.

We would like to thank everyone who submitted a proposal, and we will be working with presenters on how we can capture and share the great work that everyone is doing at UW-Whitewater!

We are planning to hold this conference again in the future – so be sure to watch for news and announcements next year! Thanks for your understanding!

If you have any questions, please contact the Learning Technology Center.

Call for Proposals: Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference 2020

As a member of the UW-Whitewater community, you are invited to submit a session proposal for the campus event 2020 Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference, “2020 Vision for Student Success.”  This special forum is meant to showcase the wide variety of ways we are all transforming the lives of our students through teaching and learning.  The Conference will be held Wednesday, May 20, 2020 on the UW-Whitewater campus.  It is sponsored by the LEARN Center, the Learning Technology Center, and the Office of Academic Assessment.

Proposals are due March 2nd, 2020.

Concurrent presentation sessions will last 45 minutes.  You are welcome to structure time to fit your presentation.  Remember Q&A!  A typical session consists of approximately 35 minutes for presentation and 10 minutes for questions and answers. 

We encourage proposals in the following themes:

  • Student Engagement: Topics may include learner engagement strategies, discussing different ways of supporting students in courses, incorporating active learning strategies, measuring student success, or other engaging teaching activities.
  • Integrating Teaching and Technology: Topics may include lessons learned from Canvas, integrating emerging technology into teaching, using mobile devices (e.g., smartphones, tablets, etc.) or apps, leveraging analytics to improve teaching or learning, ePortfolio, or preparing students for 21st century skills (e.g., evaluating information, being a digital collaborator).
  • Access and Inclusion: Topics may include accessibility (Universal Design and supporting students with disabilities), access to remote learners, closing the equity gap for underrepresented minority students, meeting the needs of Hispanic-speaking and Latinx students, and supporting non-traditional students.
  • High Impact Practices: Topics may include showcasing high impact practices, community based learning, undergraduate research, collaborative teaching practices, first year experiences, or LEAP projects.
  • Something Else: Have an idea that doesn’t fit into the themes above? That’s okay! Submit your idea using the “Something Else” theme!

Sessions that involve collaboration and creativity are encouraged!

If you have any questions about the conference, please reach out to the UW-W Learning Technology Center.

2019 Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference Recap

On May 22nd, 2019, the LEARN Center and Learning Technology Center held the 2nd Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference.  We had 107 attendees – with almost 50 presenters and 30 volunteers we really owe it to you for making this a successful event!

There were a number of great talks on a wide variety of topics, and a great keynote presentation “Even Online Students” from Dr. Evie Oregon of Western Kentucky University. If you want to see some of the handouts from the sessions,or view the recording of the keynote presentation – jump on over to the conference site: http://blogs.uww.edu/ctl/schedule

Most importantly, we heard your feedback loud and clear –and planning is underway for the 2020 Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference, which will be held on Wednesday, May 20th, 2020!  That’s a lot of 20s!  Be sure to subscribe to our blog, and keep your eye out for more information.

Don’t be a stranger in the meantime, look for a great lineup of workshops and events for the next academic year!

Conference Schedule Available – Celebrating Teaching & Learning

The conference schedule has been published and is now available at: http://go.uww.edu/ctl

Faculty and Staff: The LEARN Center and Learning Technology Center (LTC) invite you to register for the Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference on May 22nd, right here on the Whitewater campus in the University Center. 

There is still time to register!  Registration is open until May 12th!  Register at: http://blogs.uww.edu/ctl/registration

We look forward to seeing you for a great day of sessions on May 22nd!

Why should you attend?


Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference Proposals Open through March 8th

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference 2019. There is still time to submit applications! Proposals will be considered through Friday, March 8th.

This special forum hosted by the LEARN Center and the LTC showcases the wide variety of ways we are all transforming the lives of our students through teaching and learning. The Conference will be held Wednesday, May 22, 2019 on the UW-Whitewater campus. Concurrent presentation sessions will consist of 45 minute presentations with 30 minutes to discuss their topic and 15 minutes for questions and answers.

We encourage proposals in the following themes:

  • Student Engagement
  • Integrating Teaching and Technology
  • Civil Discourse and Diversity
  • High Impact Practices
  • Something Else

    To submit a presentation proposal or learn more about this year’s Celebrating Teaching and Learning conference visit: Conference Website
    http://blogs.uww.edu/ctl/

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference 2019

Celebrating Teaching and Learning Call for Proposals

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference 2019. This special forum hosted by the LEARN Center and the LTC showcases the wide variety of ways we are all transforming the lives of our students through teaching and learning. The Conference will be held Wednesday, May 22, 2019 on the UW-Whitewater campus. Concurrent presentation sessions will consist of 45 minute presentations with 30 minutes to discuss their topic and 15 minutes for questions and answers.

We encourage proposals in the following themes:

  • Student Engagement
  • Integrating Teaching and Technology
  • Civil Discourse and Diversity
  • High Impact Practices
  • Something Else

To submit a presentation proposal or learn more about this year’s Celebrating Teaching and Learning conference visit: Conference Website

Home

Call for Proposals: Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference 2019

Celebrating Teaching and Learning

As a member of the UW-Whitewater community, you are invited to submit a session proposal for the campus event Celebrating Teaching and Learning Conference 2019.  This special forum hosted by the LEARN Center and the LTC showcases the wide variety of ways we are all transforming the lives of our students through teaching and learning.  The Conference will be held Wednesday, May 22, 2019 on the UW-Whitewater campus.

Proposals are due February 22, 2019.

Presentations — Concurrent Presentation Sessions will consist of 45 minute presentations with presenters having 30 minutes to discuss their topic and 15 minutes for questions and answers.

We encourage proposals in the following themes:

Student Engagement: Topics may include learner engagement strategies, discussing different ways of supporting students in courses, incorporating active learning strategies, or other engaging teaching activities.

Integrating Teaching and Technology: Topics may include lessons learned from Canvas,  integrating emerging technology into teaching, managing mobile devices or apps, ePortfolio, or preparing students for 21st century skills (e.g., evaluating information, being a digital collaborator).

Civil Discourse and Diversity: Topics may include effective discussions, cultural navigation skills advocacy, relationship building, and a campus culture of belonging.

High Impact Practices: Topics may include showcasing high impact practices, community based learning, undergraduate research, first year experiences, or LEAP projects.

Something Else: Have an idea that doesn’t fit into the themes above? That’s okay! Submit your idea using the “Something Else” theme!

To submit a presentation proposal or learn more about this years Celebrating Teaching and Learning conference visit: Conference Website