Adaptive Learning Information Session Monday October 28th

The Learning Technology Center (LTC) is currently exploring adaptive learning technologies, focusing on the platform Cerego. If you are potentially interested in incorporating adaptive learning into your course but do not know where or how to get started, consider attending the adaptive learning information session next Monday (10/28/19) so you can learn more about the possibilities offered by adaptive learning.

The Cerego platform offers computer and mobile options.

The information session takes place at 3:30 pm on Monday October 28th, 2019 in McGraw 19A, and runs for about 45 minutes. If you are interested, please sign up here. Please note that you will need to log in with your UW-Whitewater credentials to register for this session.

If you are interested in adaptive learning, you are also invited to attend a meeting discussing adaptive learning on campus this Friday (10/25/19).

If you have any questions about adaptive learning, or would like to attend this session virtually via Webex Teams, please contact icit-techpilots@uww.edu

Come join the LTC for a discussion on adaptive learning on campus!

If you missed our September meeting, or attended that meeting and would like to talk more about the status of adaptive learning on campus, the LTC is hosting one more meeting on adaptive and personalized learning this fall.

The meeting takes place next Friday, October 25th from 9:30 to 10:15 am in McGraw 19A. All UW-Whitewater faculty, staff, and students are welcome to attend. No registration is necessary.

Adaptive learning facilitates personalized pathways for learners.

If you have any questions about this meeting, or would like to attend virtually via Webex, please contact icit-techpilots@uww.edu

Adaptive Learning Information Session for UW-Whitewater at Rock County on October 21st

Adaptive learning platforms offer a way to structure student learning activities and assessments to personalize the learning experience on how a student performs. The adaptive learning platform provides targeted feedback and additional learning material to help foster student learning. Additionally, adaptive learning platforms typically offer instructors analytics to closely monitor student progress and areas that specific students may struggle.

Cerego Logo

The UW-Whitewater Learning Technology Center is currently seeking instructors interested in piloting adaptive learning during the Spring 2020 semester. The adaptive learning platform currently being piloted is called Cerego. With Cerego, instructors can create content and, based on the students’ correct and incorrect responses, the Cerego platform determines what specific students need to study. 

Learning Technology Center staff will be at the UW-Whitewater at Rock County campus (HS0027) on Monday October 21st, 2019 from 12:00 to 12:50 pm to provide an information session on adaptive learning. If you are interested in learning more about adaptive learning, and the current adaptive learning pilot, please join us at this session!

If you have any questions about the information session, or adaptive learning more generally, please feel free to contact icit-techpilots@uww.edu

Spring 2020 Adaptive Learning Project – Call for Participants

The UW-Whitewater Learning Technology Center (LTC) is currently looking for instructors to explore the use of adaptive learning during the Spring 2020 semester.

About Adaptive Learning

Adaptive learning platforms offer a personalized learning experience for students, where the content “adapts” based on how students perform. The LTC’s current adaptive learning project focuses on the use of the platform Cerego.

Cerego Logo
Cerego adaptive learning platform

Project Purpose

Participants in the LTC’s adaptive learning project will utilize the adaptive learning platform Cerego, which is designed to comprise roughly between 7 and 10% of the learning activities/assessments in a course. The purpose of this Spring 2020 semester project is to explore the new upgrade of the Cerego adaptive learning platform.

Project Requirements

Pilot instructors have flexibility in determining the course in which to implement the Cerego adaptive learning platform. By taking part in the project, instructors agree to fully participate in, and complete, all project requirements. These requirements include attendance at instructional development sessions with LTC staff.

The following semester-by-semester breakdown conveys the expectations for participating instructors:

Fall 2019
-Attend brief (~1 hour) introductory instructional development session with LTC staff (date TBD).

Winterim 2019-2020
-Attend one-day instructional development session with LTC staff (date TBD).
-Create content in Cerego adaptive learning platform to comprise roughly 10% of the course (i.e., not used as extra credit).

Spring 2020
-Conduct at least one course using Cerego adaptive learning platform.
-Complete “check-ins” with LTC staff.
-Support the LTC in administering an end-of-semester (IRB approved) survey about the course to students.
-Present on experiences using the adaptive learning platform at a LTC workshop or event.

Project Compensation

Instructors participating in the adaptive learning project will receive a stipend to compensate the work they put into their course redesign. If all required components are completed, participating instructors can expect to receive a stipend of $1000.

Interested?

The Qualtrics application form is available here. The deadline for applications is October 31st, 2019. After that date, LTC staff will be in contact with applicants.

Need additional information?

Please feel free to attend the LTC’s adaptive learning meeting in October! If you have any questions about the adaptive learning project, feel free to contact icit-techpilots@uww.edu

You are invited to discuss adaptive learning on campus!

You are invited to join the Learning Technology Center for a conversation about adaptive learning on campus. The meeting takes place next Friday, September 27th, from 9:30 to 10:15 am in McGraw 19A. All UW-Whitewater faculty, staff, and students are welcome to join this discussion. No registration is necessary to join the meeting, so please feel free to join us!

The UW-Whitewater Learning Technology Center Mission Statement

If you are interested in learning more about adaptive learning, EDUCAUSE has a short (less than five minute) video on “3 Reasons to Try Adaptive Learning Courseware.”

If you have any questions about this meeting, or would like to attend virtually via Webex, please contact the UW-W Learning Technology Center.

Interested in personalized and adaptive learning?

Are you looking for ways to increase student engagement in your online course? Are you not sure how to best monitor student progress when you don’t see your students in class? Would you like to be able to have resources that more specifically meet the needs of your students, while allowing them to skip things they have already learned? If so, you might be interested in joining the conversation about personalized and adaptive learning on campus! Adaptive learning platforms incorporate analytics with the aim of helping instructors monitor student progress, and use various methods to cultivate individualized pathways to better meet students’ specific needs.

Adaptive learning pathways can function similarly to nodes in a network.

Over the past year, the Learning Technology Center (LTC) has collaborated with instructors around campus to explore adaptive learning. The LTC would like to invite any UW-Whitewater faculty, staff, or student interested in adaptive and personalized learning to our two meetings discussing the state of adaptive learning on campus this fall:

Friday September 27th from 9:30 to 10:15 am in McGraw 19A
Friday October 25th from 9:30 to 10:15 am in McGraw 19A

No registration is necessary! Just stop in and join the discussion!

You can find out more information on adaptive learning from EDUCAUSE’s “7 Things You Should Know About Adaptive Learning.” If you have any questions about these meetings, or adaptive learning, please contact the UW-W Learning Technology Center.

Apply for the LTC’s Adaptive Learning Project Focused on Student Success and Retention

Looking for a way to increase student success in your course? Cerego is an adaptive learning platform that adjusts to an individual’s strengths and weaknesses by honing in on the specific concepts that each individual student needs. With Cerego, instructors can create content through the use of multiple choice and true/false questions, flashcards, fill – in- the – blank passages, and interactive figures. Students are able to track their individual progress over time and instructors can identify where improvements can be made at the individual and class level.

Cerego on a mobile device

The UW-Whitewater Learning Technology Center is interested in supporting up to five instructors for the 2019-2020 academic year with stipends of $2,000 to use Cerego to provide a personalized, adaptive learning solution to increase success for all students. The LTC is particularly looking to work with instructors in courses with high “D,” “F,” “Withdraw,” or “Incomplete” (DFWI) rates to increase student success and improve retention rates in courses that show large equity gaps related to underrepresented minorities (URM), Pell-eligible, or first generation student populations.

To view the full call for applications, visit this post.

To apply, please complete this form by April 14th, 2019.

If you have any questions about this project, please contact the Learning Technology Center. 

Adaptive Learning using Cerego

Adaptive learning offers a way to structure student learning activities and assessments. In adaptive learning, content and/or assessments continuously adapt based on how a student performs, providing feedback and additional learning material so the student can better understand, and master, the course material.

Cerego Logo

With Cerego, instructors can create content for students to learn course material through the use of various options including multiple choice and true/false questions, flashcards, fill-in-the-blank passages, and interactive figures. Based on the students’ correct and incorrect responses, the Cerego platform determines what individual students need to study next. If you think you might be interested in using adaptive learning in your course over the next academic year, please consider attending the LTC’s spring adaptive learning information session to find out if adaptive learning using Cerego might be a good fit for you, your students, and your course! 

Thursday, March 7th, 2019 at 12:00 pm

If you have any questions about the information session, or adaptive learning more generally, please feel free to contact the UW-Whitewater Learning Technology Center.

TED Tips – Issue 24: Winter Break!

As the 2018 Fall Semester concludes, I want to reflect on the first six months of writing this blog. It has been a great honor to share discoveries, explore new ideas, and write about topics related to Technology, Education, and Design. I hope that these TED tips continue to inform and inspire as we celebrate teaching and learning at the University of Wisconsin Whitewater.

RELAX

Winter Break

Over the last six months, we have explored the difference is between a Learning Management System (LMS) and a Digital Learning Environment (DLE). This distinction is important as it helps to lay the foundation for some of the key decisions applicable to the migration from D2L to Canvas at Whitewater and throughout the UW System.

Canvas has been a source for several posts. The LTC Canvas peer mentors shared some of most important lessons learned while working with Canvas in the classroom. We looked at ways to support communications in Canvas and the importance of making a good first impressions. We explored grading and using Speed Grader in Canvas.

What are some different ways technology can be used in the classroom to support your teaching learning? Tools like Poll Everywhere can increase student engagement and interaction. “23 Things for Digital Knowledge” provided activities that can build student fluency in digital literacy.

TED Tips have explored the 2018 NMC Horizon Report and its view the trends, challenges, and developments in educational technology as it impacts higher education. Using the Horizon Report provides a lens to highlight pilots and innovative work taking place on campus like Adaptive Learning.

The blog will continue to promote workshops sponsored by the Learning Technology Center and its many partners and collaborators. For example, there is a series of upcoming Canvas workshops this winter: Canvas Open labs, hands on workshops for newcomers to Canvas, Construction Zones to help instructors move their courses from D2L to Canvas, and deep dives into single topics to help with your teaching. Grading in Canvas and building and using rubrics will be explored in early January. For a full list of times and locations of the upcoming winter Workshops visit the LTC. https://blogs.uww.edu/instructional/2018/12/12/canvas-workshops-winter-2019/

The next session in the 2018-19 UW-Whitewater LEARN Center/Learning Technology Center Workshop Series: “Back to Basics to Balance Workload” is Thursday, January 10th from 10:00am to 2:00pm in the University Center. This four hour workshop includes lunch and is designed as a hands-on activity to help prepare for your spring classes! Session Four: Setting the tone early saves time in the long run: Crafting your syllabus and engaging students before the first day of class and beyond.

During the morning session of the workshop, presenters will share evidence-based strategies for creating a more learner-centered syllabus and share tips for engaging students from the first day (and even before class begins!). After a lunch discussion, participants will learn more on how to better utilize Canvas in their courses in a way that clarifies organization and sets expectations in a more transparent manner. Participants will end the session with time to revise their syllabi, first day activities, and/or Canvas course pages and share their materials for small group feedback.

Participants will leave with:

  • An overview of best practices for syllabus development
  • Experience with a variety of first day activities that can increase student engagement and sense of community
  • Ideas to organize their Canvas course pages
  • Revised syllabi/activities to enhance student engagement

To register for this workshop: https://my.uww.edu/signup/Registration/Details/15867

Thank you for taking the time to read these posts! TED Tips will return in 2019. Topics next year will build on and support some of the upcoming workshops with TED Tips planned to explore several types of rubrics, building them in Canvas, design of a course homepage, navigation, analytics, and many others. I hope to experiment a bit more in format and content and hope to record the occasional complementary podcast! Until then, have a great holiday break, recharge, and relax! See you next year!

– Ted Witt
Teaching, Learning, and Technology Consultant

Resources

LTC Canvas Peer Mentors http://www.uww.edu/icit/ltc/canvas-portal/peer-mentors

Canvas Workshops Winter 2019
https://blogs.uww.edu/instructional/2018/12/12/canvas-workshops-winter-2019/

LEARN Center/Learning Technology Center Workshop Series:  “Back to Basics to Balance Workload.”  Session Four: Setting the tone early saves time in the long run: Crafting your syllabus and engaging students before the first day of class and beyond. https://my.uww.edu/signup/Registration/Details/15867

TED Tips – Issue 17: Important Developments in Technology for Higher Education — 2018 NMC Horizon Report

This week, I conclude the three part series exploring the New Media Consortium’s Horizon Report. The report “identifies and describes the higher education trends, challenges, and developments in educational technology likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry.” This week focuses on developments in educational technology.

These developments were chosen because they are likely to drive technology planning and decision making and are organized in time intervals related to their approximate time of wide spread adoption. The report identifies seven broad categories of technologies, tools, and strategies. The categories help us understand where we are today. The developments look ahead where we may be going in the future.

Categories of Technology

Consumer technology are tools originally created for recreational or consumer use. As the technologies become more utilized, they have been used as learning aids. Examples include: drones and wearable technologies like fitness trackers. The move from physical textbook to shorter videos highlights this “consumer demand” driving change in the classroom.

Digital strategies enrich teaching and learning by repurposing older activities for the modern digital classroom. They often reinvent conventional ideas to create meaningful 21st century experiences. The transformation of a pager to a cell phone to a smartphone exemplifies this march towards digitalization. Other examples include: The use of location intelligence (GPS), digital makerspaces, and applying concepts of gamification to the classroom.

Enabling technologies transform what we expect of our devices. The classic example is the voice activated computer as depicted in Star Trek; but more commonly realized through Alexa, Siri, and the Google Assistant. Those enabling technologies allow us to do more things. The trend towards cord-cutting is another example.

Internet technologies represent the underlying digital infrastructure. Internet technologies allow us to interact seamlessly and connect more devices in more ways. The “Internet of Things” is an example of how more components in the wired world are being connected to the internet. Another way to think about this is the idea that the Internet is a “utility” — along with the corresponding Digital Divide that highlight inequalities in the infrastructure.

Learning technologies are resources specifically developed for education. They help make learning accessible and available to all. Our digital learning environment is an example. Learning environments are increasingly customizable and personalized. Online courses and the related mobile learning platforms expand the access of education. Adaptive learning is another example of a learning technology. Larger systems like Lynda.com have been developed that offer training and learning at our fingertips. Fully online programs have redefined higher education possibilities…and created new opportunities.

The rise of social media technologies have changed communication and interpersonal relationships. Students communicate and collaborate quickly online. While research used to be the domain of the library, Google has become our primary search engine. Social networks, crowdsourcing, and issues regarding online identity and privacy fall in this category. Students can use sites like Facebook and Instagram to share and retrieve information and multimedia quickly.

Important Developments in Technology for Higher Education

Developments in Technology for Higher Education

Developments in Technology for Higher Education

Finally, visualization technologies are a growing set of tools that allow for large sets of information to be analyzed and displayed. They enable easier data driven decisions by making the complex simple.  Large sets of information can be visualized in real time.  New areas of virtualization and augmented or mixed realities fit into this broad category. Another example is 3D printing.

With the categories in mind, I want to briefly identify the important developments in educational technology for higher education as identifies in the Horizon Report. A key criterion for inclusion in the report was its potential relevance to teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in higher education.

Time-to-Adoption Horizon: One Year or Less

Analytics Technologies: Data and big data are being used more frequently to support higher education…and there is a continued focus on measuring learning. Using “grades” as an analytics tool for students to measure their success is nothing new. Instructors, students, administrators and teachers are relying on more high tech analytics to provide insights to complete their tasks. For examples, analytics technologies can help identify at-risk students and trigger interventions. Analytics can be used by students to guide and improve their own learning and by teachers to improve outcomes and tailor content in the classroom. Post education career options can be enhanced by connecting into resources liked LinkedIn that offer data-driven, analytics to help customize pathways to employment.

Makerspaces work by bringing together experts and novices from a variety of disciplines to design, build, invent, and rethink various products. Makerspaces connect higher education and industry. These spaces often include computers, power tools, 3D printers, and other technologies. A perceived benefit of makerspaces is that it engages learners to develop hands-on learning.

Time-to-Adoption Horizon: Two to Three Years

Adaptive Learning: Last week we explored a pilot project on Adaptive Learning here at the University of Wisconsin Whitewater. Adaptive learning is one technique for providing personalized learning, which aims to provide efficient, effective, and customized learning paths to engage each student. Finding the correct applications, developing the pathways, implementing the solutions, will take time.

Artificial Intelligence is no longer in the realm of fiction! Amazon uses it to predict products you may be interested in (and they want to sell); google uses it to guess what you will type next and search for; advertising uses it to find ways to connect individual products to users. Self-driving cars appear imminent. In education, Artificial Intelligence is becoming increasingly utilized for implementing today’s leading pedagogical trends, such as personalized learning. Analytics technologies allow us to do descriptive and diagnostic work; artificial intelligence will allow us to do more predictive and prescriptive work.

Time-to-Adoption Horizon: Four to Five Years

Mixed Reality is an emerging environment where digital and physical objects co-exist. The augmented reality game Pokémon Go is an example of this intersection. In education, virtual reality simulations have be used to train and asses medical students; first responders have trained in mixed reality environment overlaying hot-spots and other hazards. In the social sciences mixed reality tools have allowed for the virtual recreation of historical landmarks and allowed students to interact with virtual residents.

Robotics: The Harvard Business Review notes… “We expect the global industrial robot population to double to about four million by 2020, changing the competitive landscape in dozens of fields — from underground mining to consumer goods and aerospace manufacturing.” They go on to provide an example: “Foxconn, which employs more than a million workers in mainland China, plans to automate 70% of its assembly work within the next three years.” Higher education faces a significant challenge: preparing students for success in the next generation workforce and addressing corresponding emergent societal challenges.

I hope this exploration of the 2018 Higher Education Horizon Report has provided a window into the future. The report is provides a lot of ideas to fuel our themes of Technology, Education and Design. Next week offers a change of pace as I will provide updates from the 2018 Quality Matters Connect conference from St. Louis!

– Ted Witt
Teaching, Learning, and Technology Consultant

RESOURCES:
2018 NMC Horizon Report
Citation: Samantha Adams Becker, Malcolm Brown, Eden Dahlstrom, Annie Davis, Kristi DePaul, Veronica Diaz, and Jeffrey Pomerantz. NMC Horizon Report: 2018 Higher Education Edition. Louisville, CO: EDUCAUSE, 2018.
https://library.educause.edu/resources/2018/8/2018-nmc-horizon-report
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Examples and further Reading:

Learning Analytics: https://tech.ed.gov/learning-analytics/

Makerspaces: http://isam2018.hemi-makers.org/

Adaptive Learning: http://edtechreview.in/trends-insights/trends/2923-the-role-of-adaptive-learning-in-education

Artificial Intelligence: 7 Roles for Artificial Intelligence in Education by Matthew Lynch
https://www.thetechedvocate.org/7-roles-for-artificial-intelligence-in-education/

Augmented Reality: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/271706077_Augmented_Reality_application_in_Higher_Education

Robotics: Building Tomorrow’s Robots by Gregory Mone
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/609004/building-tomorrows-robots/

The Age of Smart, Safe, Cheap Robots Is Already Here
https://hbr.org/2015/06/the-age-of-smart-safe-cheap-robots-is-already-here