The Ultimate Stay-Cation

I don’t know about you all, but my spring break is going to contain a lot of hours at work for me. It’s not the most exotic way to spend it, but I’m not going to let that get me down. I have a day or two to myself, and my number one plan is to go hiking somewhere, and hopefully experience a bit warmer weather. I found an article that talked about some of the best places in Wisconsin.  I’m going to rank the top three that I want to visit most! Continue reading

Staying Away From Spring Allergies

Ahhhhh! That smell is in the air… The weather is FINALLY starting to change and the sense of summer is just around the corner. I mean, let’s be real, who doesn’t love to be outside when we (Midwesterners) see the thermometer hit 60 degrees for the first time? All the good that comes with spring, also carries the dreaded allergies with it. The sniffles, coughs, and itchy eyes take over our bodies like the black plague. Great news, though! There are some precautionary steps you can take to help prevent from having to go through your annual box(es) of tissues this spring:

First and foremost, try your best to limit your time outside. I know I know this may be challenging because you want nothing more than to soak up the fresh air. BUT, they do say April showers bring May flowers, right? Those flowers and leaf buds that are just starting to sprout carry a crazy amount of pollen and can spring on your allergies (pun intended). If you really can’t find a way to escape long periods in the newly fresh air, make sure to wear sunglasses, to prevent the pollen from finding its way into your eyes. Also, make sure to wash your hair in the shower well in order to prevent you from bringing the pollen into your household.

 

Another great way is to hop on the allergy medicine EARLY. It’s kind of like riding a bike; you wear your helmet to prevent any head injuries when you fall. In this case, prevent the allergies from even being able to beat your immune system. With all of this said, I am NOT a doctor, therefore make sure you discuss this option with someone who has a PhD to make sure it is safe for you to consume.

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Aaacchooo!! Spring allergies return.

Spring Allergies PhotoBy: Abbey Bowen

Sneezes, runny noses and itchy eyes. Ah, the symptoms of spring allergies!

Spring allergies are mainly triggered by pollen release from trees, grasses and weeds. Your immune system mistakes pollen as a foreign antibody and attacks the allergens. This attack releases chemicals known as histamines into the blood. Histamines cause runny noses, itchy eyes, etc.

Allergic rhinitis (allergies) affects 10 to 30 percent of adults and almost 40 percent of children. With high percentage like this, there’s a good chance you suffer from allergies of some kind.

So, what can you do to alleviate your symptoms?  Dr. Andy Nish, and allergist in Georgia, recommends changing your environment before going on medication. Nish says to limit your outdoor activity to the times in which pollen levels are the lowest. Such levels can be found by checking local weather reports.

According to Joanna Broder, of Webmd.com, it can also be helpful to keep the windows of your home and car closed at all times. She also suggests running your air conditioning to filter the air.

If simply avoiding the outdoors and fresh air doesn’t work, over-the-counter, non-sedating medications with antihistamine can help rid you of your symptoms, Dr. Paul Enright, allergy specialist, says. Look for “antihistamine” on labels when looking for eye drops, and decongestants. If your nose continues to run, however, saline nose sprays may also provide relief.

While it can help to avoid the outdoors, spring allergies should not throw off your workout routine! Like mentioned before, you can always check pollen counts before heading outside, or you can work out from the indoor comfort of the Weight Room in the Williams Center or University Fitness in the basement of Wells resident hall.

However, asthma triggered by allergies is a whole other story. Asthma is a chronic disease that causes inflammation in both the small and large airways, which are known as the branches that carry air into the lungs. Symptoms of asthma include wheezing, shortness of breath and coughing. For some sufferers, these symptoms become worsened when exposed to allergens. Asthma can be controlled through the use of inhalers and nebulizer treatments.

It’s hard to say whether it is “safe” or not to work out when asthma symptoms flair, but for the most part it’s best to just listen to your own body.

It’s safe to say that allergies stink, but there are things you can do to combat your symptoms! Most importantly, don’t let them interfere with your normal workout routine. If I missed any information you think is of key importance, please e-mail me at BowenAK15@uww.edu.

~Remember, you have to learn to love yourself before you can truly love someone else~
Abbey :]

Get out and smell the roses: The benefits of fresh air

Fresh Air PhotoBy: Eric Hess

Getting sick of sitting indoors and the terribly cold winter that we’ve had? Me too, but it’s finally getting warm enough to spend some quality time outdoors and reap the benefits of fresh air and the sun light. What are the benefits you ask? Well let me tell you a few!

Fresh air makes you smarter! Well not quite, but the oxygen in fresh air helps brain functions and helps you use more of your brain. Studies have proven that being outside for a certain period of time can help prevent ADHD, too.

Helps clean out your lungs. Inhaling fresh air helps clean out your lungs and allows for you to take deeper breaths. Which also allows for you to consume more oxygen into your body with your deeper breaths.

Better Sleep! Who doesn’t need better sleep? Giving yourself some time outside to relax, soak in the sunlight and breathe outside air can help your body make it through the day without being tired and also help you fall asleep faster at night.

Vitamin D. Fresh air will not give you this, but catching some sunlight rays will help get your daily dose of vitamin D. About 15-30 minutes of sunlight will usually do the trick. Vitamin D can help your bones form properly and can help reduce your risk for multiple bone diseases.

It is hard to find good quality fresh air. If you live in a city or even in a small town around a factory or a lot of cars, the quality of air can be less than if you were in a forest surrounded by oxygen rich trees and plants. In order to really benefit from fresh air, try and get out to a park or somewhere that is clean and full of trees and plants!

Yesterday you said tomorrow.
-Eric Hess

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100603172219.htm
http://www.livestrong.com/article/436651-the-effects-of-sunlight-fresh-air-on-the-body/