Welcome to Ride the Rails

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My name is Dalon Williams, and I am a Media Art Major and Dance Minor at the University of Wisconsin Whitewater (UWW). I will be posting weekly content about different trains, the history of railroads, how trains are built and made, and fun facts about them. For a more in-depth discussion, we will take a train ride through different trains, museums, games, how railroads are made and built, and much more. I hope you are excited to see the different types of information that will be exciting and fun to see. Please check out the first post the discuss the train Tornado.

The Santa Fe Train/ Our first Game: Train Simulator

Welcome back, everyone, to the page about trains… Ride the Rails. Today will be a bit of a shift into some different topics of trains, and we will also be looking into some more media outlets of trains. I will most likely be posting more museums, but we will be stepping away from that. For the next few weeks, we will be focusing on some moves and games, and the first one I will be introducing is Train Simulator 2021. There are many previous versions, but this game is impressive and overly realistic per se. It includes tons of maps from all over the world and various trains, including some discussed within past and future posts. The game retails for about 60 bucks with over 600 add-ons, including different trains, maps, packs, scenery, and event add-ons. I have had this game since the version of railworks, so almost ten years now. I recommend it if you enjoy the engineering of trains and include driving them and maintaining them on the rails. Something new about our post is that we will be shifting from Steam to Diesel trains. Our first Diesel trains will be on the Santa Fe passenger diesel trains, which are popular in the Western part of the U.S. This train does not often get driven like in the past, EMD-7; however, there are various train rebuilds. The Sante Fe train was created in February 1949 – December 1953, and nearly 2,400 wear was built, with 1,500 boosters getting constructed. Boosters or Cabless cars are similar to the tender of a steam train. Helping diesel run and adding a more excellent look to the diesel train. We will discuss each topic more within the other pages, and remember to check out the new video of photos of the week. Have a good week 🙂

Big Boy 4014 / Steamtown National Historic Site

Welcome back to my blog. I hope everyone is excited to learn some astonishing facts about trains. Today, I will be sharing some fun information about the infamous Big Boy 4014 owned but Union the pacific. We also will be learning a little about the steam town national Historic site and, of course, the link to it. “Union Pacific 4014, also known as the “Big Boy,” is a steam locomotive owned and operated by the Union Pacific (UP) as part of their heritage fleet.” When I tell you this train is enormous, it is the most considerable steam train on earth. The locomotive is 132 feet long and weighs a whopping 1.2 million pounds. INSANE. 4014 is the last of its kind as 25 of them were made into existence, and only eight remain today. 4014 is the only one that operates on the tracks of today out of the eight. This train is fascinating ready about. Next, the steam town national historical museum; here at this museum in Scranton, Pennsylvania, you can find the most American manufactured trains made since the beginning of steam engines. Also, where you can find the other existing seven trains that are no longer operating from the extensive boy fleet, visits from 4014 come into play. The site was made in 1986 on October 30th. Scary right, an old train yard with old trains preexisting since the beginning of time. Please remember to check out the website and look at the different trains and programs provided. Please remember to look through the post and comment your interest.

A4 Class/ National Railway Museum

Hello everyone, welcome back to my blog. I hope everyone is having a good week and are staying well and safe. I will be discussing the new topic today on our pages. We will be talking about the famous LNER A4 class, which got built-in 1935. This model got made by Nigel Gresley, the same designer who created the Flying Scotsman. The A4 courses are known to be the fastest steam trains globally and get designed to become streamlined. A streamliner is a vehicle incorporating streamlining in shape, providing reduced air resistance. The term gets applied to high-speed railway trainsets of the 1930s to 1950s and their successor “bullet trains.” Please remember to check out the weekly photo and video this week to see more pieces of information and pictures of the train. This week, another post will be made on The National Railway Museum, a museum in York forming part of the Science Museum Group. The museum tells the story of rail transport in Britain and its impact on society. This first museum post will be made for the website, so please check it out as soon as possible. This museum contains some of the crucial facts of high-quality trains, including the streamlined locomotive, Mallard, the fastest speed steam train in the world. The museum also includes the Flying Scotsman, which is a great post to check out if you are interested in learning more about the brother of the A4 classes. Please remember to comment and provide feedback on things you know about the topic. 

The Flying Scottsman

Welcome to my page; today’s post will discuss the Flying Scotsman, a famous steam train that has defined and has become one of the most successful builts within train history. This train will almost be 100 years old in a few years, being a part of the LNER (London and North Eastern Railway) railway. Flying Scotsman was built in Doncaster, the newly formed London and North Eastern Railway (LNER). It left the works on 24 February 1923 with number 1472. Sir Nigel Gresley designed it as part of the A1 class—the most powerful locomotives used by the LNER at that time. I have also updated this week’s video for the Flying Scotsman and the picture with the post and photo of the week. Would you please discuss what you learned or enjoyed about the Flying Scotsman? Even put fun historical facts about the train to discuss the many rebuilds it went through. The Flying Scotsman has gone through many rebuilds and is still a living train that flies across the line today. Next week, you will learn about the train’s cousin/ brother. The A4 Bittern class pacific, this train has defined a lot of the history by being one of the fastest steam trains in the world being the flying Scotsman record. We will also introduce our first museum, the national railway museum, which discusses the different trains and historical facts of railroad history. I will introduce the various trains in the museum, the other artifacts it holds, and fun facts in the museum. Stay tuned !!!