Warhawk Almanac: A History of Lambda Chi Alpha at UW-Whitewater

Lambda Chi Alpha Coat of Arms
Lambda Chi Alpha Coat of Arms, 1966.

One of UW-Whitewater’s most prestigious fraternities, Lambda Chi Alpha, has a long history of establishing connections between young men attending university on a local and national level. Campus recognized the fraternity as Beta Kappa Nu and Chi Delta Rho. The original Chi Delta Rho fraternity began operation in 1930 in Stevens Point, Wisconsin, at the Central State Teacher’s College (Now UW-Stevens Point). The chapter in Stevens Point would become the Alpha chapter after the Beta Chapter began coordination at Wisconsin State College in Whitewater.[1]

In 1965, Chi Delta Rho officially affiliated with the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity.[2] Lambda Chi Alpha started operating as a national fraternity in Boston, Massachusetts in 1909.[3] The fraternity built its foundation around the goal of producing “well-rounded men” through the prioritization of scholarships and fellowship.[4] In celebration of the fraternity’s new affiliation, a plethora of events occurred on campus, including group photographs, a luncheon, presentations by guest speakers from other Lambda Chi Alpha Chapters, appearances from previous Chi Delta Rho alumni, the designation of the fraternity’s sweetheart, “The Crescent Girl”, formal banquet and open house.[5]

Lambda Chi at a homecoming event, 1975.
Lambda Chi Alpha Members at Homecoming rally, 1975.
Chopper, the Lambda Chi Alpha House St. Bernard.
Lambda Chi Alpha Member with the fraternity St. Bernard, Chopper, 1967.

Lambda Chi Alpha was known for its academic prowess and taught leadership skills by participating in events like intramural sports. Lambda Chi Alpha quickly became an avid supporter of university athletics and established a tradition of running the game ball to an away game. The first example of this loyalty display came in 1966 when the fraternity brothers set out to La Crosse to support the Warhawk Football Team. The run would conclude once a member of Lambda Chi Alpha made it onto the field and gave a game ball to the referee.[6] Lambda Chi Alpha additionally hosted and participated in many campus events. During May Week in 1969, the group hosted the first “piano bash”, which served as a race between Lambda Chi Alpha and other fraternities to destroy a piano and fit all the pieces through a 6-inch hole.[7] In 1973, Lambda Chi sponsored “Fall Frolics” also during the campus’ May Week festivities. The event was planned to span over three days, and would have a wine-drinking contest, a Jell-O eating contest, vintage cars, a water fight, carnival rides, and all benefits would go to the Whitewater Senior Citizen’s Leisure Club.[8] In 1991, the fraternity started a teeter-totter fundraiser in collaboration with the Alpha Sigma Sorority. Lambda Chi Alpha and Alpha Sigma members rode a teeter-totter for a combined 100 hours to fundraise $5,000 for the Make a Wish Foundation.[9] In 2023, Lambda Chi Alpha won the “Best Greek-Sponsored Event” award after successfully collecting 2,000 pounds of items for the nonprofit organization, “Feeding America”.

Lambda Chi Alpha members on the roof in 1989.
Lambda Chi Alpha Members on roof, 1989.
Lambda Chi Alpha Officers, 1986.
Lambda Chi Alpha Officers, 1986.

Lambda Chi Alpha has served the UW-Whitewater campus through its philanthropy and social opportunities for students. They have also done so while maintaining an exemplary academic standard and often had the highest fraternity grade point average of all the fraternities. [10] On September 30, Lambda Chi Alpha will host an event celebrating their legacies at UW-Whitewater. The event will include tours, a barbeque, a historical exhibit, and Lambda Chi Alpha alumni from throughout their existence. Thank you, Lambda Chi Alpha, for the continued commitment to UW-Whitewater’s academic, social, and philanthropic initiatives!

Lambda Chi Alpha house in 1989.
Lambda Chi Alpha House, 1989.
Sign in front of Lambda Chi Alpha's house in 1989.
Lambda Chi Alpha Members on roof, 1989.

[1] “Beta Chapter of Chi Delta Rho Adopts State Charter,” Royal Purple, February 18, 1935, https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.32491114.

[2] “Chi Delta Rho to Become Lambda Chi Alpha on Saturday”, Royal Purple, March 31, 1965, https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.32934919.

[3] Minnieska, 1989, UW-Whitewater Archives and Area Research Center, 176.

[4] Minnieska, 1965, UW-Whitewater Archives and Area Research Center, 160.

[5] “Weekend of Activity Sees Chi Delt Become Lambda Chi Alpha National”, Royal Purple, April 7, 1965, https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.32934920.

[6] “Lambda Chis to Carry Game Ball From Whitewater to Oshkosh”, Royal Purple, November 10, 1966, https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.32934981.

[7] “Dance will follow piano smashing”, Royal Purple, May 5, 1969, https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.32935097.

[8] “Fall Frolics, September 8”, Royal Purple, September 5, 1972, UW-Whitewater Archives and Area Research Center, 1. 

[9] “Two Greek organizations teeter totter for charity”, Royal Purple, April 24, 1991, https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.34305537.

[10] Minnieska, 1991, UW-Whitewater Archives and Area Research Center, 147.

Posted in Archives & ARC | Leave a comment

Warhawk Almanac: A Center School Comes to Rock County!

Before the opening of UW-Rock County in 1966, there had yet to be an access point for higher education in the Janesville area. The lack of access to higher education in Rock County created interest from the State Coordinating Committee for Higher Education (CCHE) in bringing university center schools and branch campuses to the area.[1]

Campus construction
Construction of the campus, Janesville, ca. 1965, University of Wisconsin Digital Collections, https://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/4IWTMS2PWX6OX87

In March of 1963, the CCHE submitted a report that identified Rock County as one of six new campuses developed between 1965-69.[2] Ideally, this would put a two-year or four-year university within driving distance of all Wisconsin residents looking for education. Tension rose specifically regarding the UW Center and State College branch campuses, owing to the State Colleges’ belief that any campus closer to a state college than it was to Madison should be run by the State Colleges. The Rock County campus was a prime example, as the Whitewater State School resided only 19 miles northeast of Janesville. Officials started compiling potential building sites once the campus was approved. Initially, officials proposed three possible campus locations in the Janesville area and three in the Beloit area. Janesville ultimately had the edge for a few reasons. Janesville’s site would serve a broader area of Wisconsin than Beloit. The city had adequate sewer and water systems to incorporate into the campus and had a better connection to the highway.[3] The University of Wisconsin Board of Regents would ultimately select a site in Janesville.

Campus Aerial, 1965
College building site, Janesville, 1965, University of Wisconsin Digital Collections, https://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/XZS7PD5L3AY4L86

After selecting the site, the administration selected Knodle-Rose & Associates Architects to design the new university. Campus chose Knodle-Rose because of its reputation for completing projects quickly, which was especially important given the quick turnaround of the two-year project timeline.[4] In 1965, original plans for the campus were approved, with an estimated cost of about $1,050,000. These plans included an administrative building, an instructional building, and an athletic building. However, the administrators pushed back building the athletic facility to save $350,000 from the project budget. Construction of the administrative and instructional building began on October 6, 1965. The buildings could accommodate 500 students, and campus officials quickly noted that at the rate of Janesville’s growth, they would need to promptly consider facilities that would meet enrollment needs beyond that amount.[5]

Rock County Center Dedication
Rock County Center, Janesville, ca. 1964, University of Wisconsin Digital Collections, https://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/ELAE2TFB2TYYU8L

In the first phase of selecting campus administration, Charles Miller was named Dean of the new Rock County Center. Miller had experience working with Center campuses after working at the Marathon County Center in Wausau, Wisconsin.[6] During the organization of the new Center, Miller emphasized the function of the centers as an opportunity for research, public relations, and teaching.[7] Other original campus staff of the new center school included student advisor Gerald Henry, librarian, Gary Lenox, four faculty with Ph.D.’s, five instructors with a master’s, and a facilities staff. Campus officially opened on September 6, 1966, to approximately 250 students.

Fall Orientation
Student Orientation, Janesville, 1966, University of Wisconsin Digital Collections, https://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/QSGD5N4DJ3YEA8E

[1] Wisconsin State Journal, October 11, 1963, in Rock County 1964-1968 scrapbook, University of Wisconsin Whitewater and Area Research Center, Andersen Library, Whitewater, WI.

[2] Jerry L. Bower, The University of Wisconsin Colleges 1919-1997, (New Past Press, Inc.: Friendship, WI, 2002), 77.

[3] Janesville Daily Gazette, November 16, 1964, in Rock County 1964-1968 scrapbook University of Wisconsin Whitewater and Area Research Center, Andersen Library, Whitewater, WI.

[4] Janesville Daily Gazette, December 14, 1964, in Rock County 1964-1968 scrapbook University of Wisconsin Whitewater and Area Research Center, Andersen Library, Whitewater, WI.

[5] Janesville Gazette, September 2, 1966, in Rock County 1964-1968 scrapbook University of Wisconsin Whitewater and Area Research Center, Andersen Library, Whitewater, WI.

[6] Beloit Daily News, September 11, 1965, in Rock County 1964-1968 scrapbook University of Wisconsin Whitewater and Area Research Center, Andersen Library, Whitewater, WI.

[7] Evansville Review, November 4, 1965, in Rock County 1964-68 scrapbook University of Wisconsin Whitewater and Area Research Center, Andersen Library, Whitewater, WI.

Posted in Archives & ARC | Leave a comment

Warhawk Almanac: John Williams Stearns

John William Stearns, president of the Whitewater Normal School from 1878 – 1885, served as a welcome contrast to his predecessor William F. Phelps. The presidency of William F. Phelps was unpopular among the school’s faculty and students. The pedagogy and administration were systematic and mechanical, and Phelps’s term came to a tempestuous finale in 1878. Following the resignation of Phelps, the normal school’s teacher education programs flourished under the presidency of John William Stearns.

Photo of President John William Stearns
John William Stearns[1]

Born in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, in 1839, John W. Stearns graduated from Harvard University in 1860 before gaining teaching and leadership experience across the United States and abroad. He taught at the Normal School in Winona, Minnesota; he was a high school principal in Canton, Illinois; a Latin professor at the University of Chicago; and the director of the National Normal School in Tucuman, Argentina.[1] Upon President Phelps’s resignation, the school’s Board of Regents selected Stearns as the next president in 1878.[2]

During his tenure at the Whitewater Normal School, Stearns drastically improved teacher education, student and faculty life and culture, and the library. A foe of formalism, Stearns was opposed to “excessive bookishness.”[3] He believed “the letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life.”[4] As such, he approached his leadership with a courteous and kind disposition fostering esteem and cooperation among the students and faculty. Additionally, Stearns’s morning talks to the school left lasting impressions, and he promoted voluntary observance of school regulations rather than strictly enforcing rules. While maintaining high standards of conduct, the normal school became less formal and rigid in contrast to Phelps’s presidency.[5]

President Stearns directly improved teacher education by advocating for additional time for students to focus on understanding the basic principles so as to eliminate the “mechanical conceptions of teaching.”[6] In 1881, the Board of Regents heard his appeal and allotted an additional six months to the elementary course so that students could concentrate on philosophical comprehension of principles.[7] The implementation of a shop-work course also enhanced teacher education. Apropos of his opinion about excessive bookishness, Stearns believed that woodworking knowledge would develop all students– especially women– by making them more independent and “self-helpful.”[8] Finally, Stearns augmented the library by expanding the reference library from 600 volumes to 1,586 volumes.[9] This addition to the library’s collection meant that Whitewater Normal School could boast the most extensive library of general books of the four normal schools in Wisconsin.[10]

Stearns’s presidency at the Whitewater Normal School ended in 1885 when he accepted an invitation from the State University of Madison as the chair of pedagogy, and students and faculty alike regretted seeing him leave.[11] While he was known for his broad, quickening, and liberalizing influences on campus, J. W. Stearns inspired students to strive for their highest attainable results.


[1] Albert Salisbury, Historical Sketches of The First Quarter-Century of The State Normal School At Whitewater, Wisconsin With a Catalog of Its Graduates and a Record of Their Work: 1868-1893, (Madison: Tracy, Gibbs & Co, 1893), 127.

[2] “President Stearns,” The Whitewater Register, August 15th, 1878.

[3] Board of Regents, First Biennial Report, 1882-84.

[4] Salisbury, 9.

[5] Salisbury, 127.

[6] Mary Janette Bohi, A History of Wisconsin State University Whitewater 1868-1968 (Whitewater: Whitewater State University Foundation Inc, 1967), 62.

[7] Bohi, 62.

[8] Bohi, 63.

[9] Bohi, 61-62.

[10] Bohi, 61.

[11] Salisbury, 10.

Posted in Archives & ARC | 2 Comments

Warhawk Almanac: Literary Societies

Long before Whitewater Normal School (now UW-Whitewater) had fraternities and sororities, students joined literary societies. On May 1, 1868, just ten days after the school opened its doors, the Lincolnian Literary Society (LLS) convened for the first time.[1] Literary societies were early social organizations with strict rules for membership and conduct. The LLS, comprised solely of male students, hosted programs that included music performances, oration, and debate.

1869 Course Catalog
1869 Course Catalog[2]
1909 Lincolnian Literary Society
1909 Lincolnian Literary Society[3]

Not to be outdone by the gentlemen, the female students soon organized into the Young Ladies Literary Society (YLLS) and met to adopt a constitution in February 1872. [4] The Constitution, By-Laws, and Rules of Order for the group read as follows:

“We the undersigned do declare ourselves an Association for mutual improvement in Elocution, Composition, and Debate, and for enlarging our fund of general intelligence; in the pursuit of which objects we desire to exhibit a due consideration for the opinions and feelings of others, to maintain a perfect command of temper in all our in intercourse, to seek for truth on all our exercises..”[5]

Young Ladies Literary Society Constitution
Young Ladies Literary Society Constitution[6]

Both organizations met regularly to debate amongst themselves and occasionally the held joint meetings, the first of which was in June 1872. The debate topic question: “Resolved: That the futures has more to do with the present than the past.” The YLLS argued for the affirmative while the L.L.S. argued the negative. At the end of the debate, the judges decided in favor of the L.L.S. [7]

By 1896, the YLLS had disbanded, but literary societies continued to grow and thrive on campus. The Normal School added two additional literary societies in 1898, Aureola and Philomathia. While the charter members of Aureola constituted both male and female students, by 1911 only female students were allowed entrance into the organization. The Preamble for both society’s constitutions was the same:

We, students of the Whitewater State Normal School, desirous of cultivating our moral, social, and intellectual faculties, and believing that such cultivation will be promoted by voluntary association, do hereby form ourselves into a society…”[8]

Debating amongst the groups became so popular that the school organized an Oratorical Association to host oratorical contests between the Literary Societies. In 1909, Aureola and LLS debated the question of whether or not the United States should retain the Phillippines. The LLS won with their argument for the negative.[9]

By 1915, groups began to divide into those that wished to continue to dedicate themselves to debate and those that wanted to be more socially oriented organizations. The LLS became the Whitewater Oratorical League. This group was part of the Inter-Normal Oratorical League, comprised of debating teams from the other Wisconsin Normal Schools. Aureola and Philomathia were among the first official social sororities on campus when they became affiliated with Alpha Sigma and Sigma, Sigma, Sigma in 1932.

In the 1920s, the term “Forensics” began to replace “Debate.” The Whitewater Forensic League formed in 1923 around the following charge:

We, the students of Whitewater Normal School, realizing the value of the ability to speak in public to a teacher, and being desirous of securing practical work in public speaking, do hereby form ourselves into this society…[11]

The UW-Whitewater Forensics Team continues the long tradition of debate by winning over “100 awards annually in all three areas: limited preparation, public address, and interpretation.”[12]

[1]Lincolnian Literary Society Treasurer’s Book, Student Affairs Records, UW-Whitewater Archives & Area Research Center, Andersen Library, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI.
[2]Whitewater Normal School. “Course Catalog 1868 and 1869.” p. 14
[3]University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, 1909 Minneiska, p. 62 https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.29546542.
[4] Young Ladies Literary Society Minutes, 1872, Student Affairs Records, UW-Whitewater Archives & Area Research Center, Andersen Library, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI.
[5]Young Ladies Literary Society Constitution and Minutes, 1877, Student Affairs Records, UW-Whitewater Archives & Area Research Center, Andersen Library, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI.
[6]Ibid.
[7]Young Ladies Literary Society Minutes, 1872, Student Affairs Records, UW-Whitewater Archives & Area Research Center, Andersen Library, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI.
[8]“Constitution and By-Laws of the Philomathia Literary Society of the State Normal School, whitewater, Wisconsin,” Student Affairs Records, W-Whitewater Archives & Area Research Center, Andersen Library, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI.
[9]University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, 1909 Minneiska, p. 62 https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.29546542.
[10]University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, 1909 Minneiska, p. 50 https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.29546542.
[11]Whitewater Normal Forensic League Minutes, Student Affairs Records, UW-Whitewater Archives & Area Research Center, Andersen Library, UW-Whitewater, Whitewater, WI.
[12]UW-Whitewater. “Forensics Team.” Camps and Conferences. https://www.uww.edu/ce/camps/additional/forensics/team-bio.

Posted in Archives & ARC | Tagged | Comments Off on Warhawk Almanac: Literary Societies

Warhawk Almanac: Arthur Upham

Summer, with so few students on campus, is a convenient time to complete campus renovation projects. Upgrading the Upham Hall Greenhouse is one such renovation project happening on campus this summer. The building is named for Arthur Aquila Upham, an important figure who played a number of key roles in the early history of the Whitewater Normal School as well as the city of Whitewater. 

Inside Upham Hall Greenhouse

Arthur Upham taught physics, which was his specialty, in addition to a variety of other classes including chemistry, carpentry, agriculture, zoology, geology, and biology during his tenure at the Whitewater Normal School from 1888 – 1922.[1] Professor Upham believed in hands-on learning and since “science laboratory equipment was virtually nonexistent in any school in Wisconsin” at this time, he taught his students to build their own laboratory equipment.[2] He even brought in his own horse Nancy to his Elements of Agriculture class to provide his students with first-hand experience.

In addition to his teaching responsibilities, Upham was involved with numerous other campus activities. He established a bird watching club, wrote a number of textbooks, including An Introduction to Agriculture in 1910, and served as the first Vice President of the school from 1919-1922. To the students on campus, Arthur Upham was affectionately known as “Daddy” due to his amiable and fatherly nature.[3] 

Arthur Upham (holding mortar and pestle) with science class

Outside of the Normal School, Upham was an active member of the Whitewater community. He served as the superintendent of Whitewater schools from 1895 to 1900, was appointed mayor of the city from 1909 to 1911, acted as master of the Masonic Lodge, served as chairman of the state board of examiners, was actively involved with the congregational church, and fulfilled a number of public speaking engagements.[4] Upon his death in November 1927, a tribute to Upham in the Whitewater Register read that, “few men are loved as he has been.”[5]

Exterior of Upham Hall

Due to the increase in student enrollment during the 1960s, the campus was experiencing a classroom shortage.[6] It is no surprise that when a building dedicated to the sciences was constructed on campus to help alleviate this shortage, it would be named in honor of Professor Arthur Upham. Upham Hall officially opened for the fall semester in 1963 and the greenhouse was added to the building in 1980. Today, Upham Hall continues to honor Arthur Upham’s legacy on campus as the home to the physics, chemistry, biology, and geography, geology, and environmental science departments.


[1]  Richard Carlton Haney, Campus Cornerstones, University of Wisconsin – Whitewater: Biographical Sketches of the People for Whom Buildings & Facilities are Named, (Whitewater, Wisconsin: University of Wisconsin – Whitewater, 1997), 99.

[2] Haney, Campus Cornerstones, 98.

[3] Haney, Campus Cornerstones, 98.

[4] “Funeral of Arthur A. Upham at Church on Tuesday Afternoon,” Whitewater Register, November 24, 1927. https://irvinlyoung.advantage-preservation.com/viewer/?k=%22upham%22&i=f&by=1927&bdd=1920&d=01011927-12311927&m=between&ord=k1&fn=the_whitewater_press_usa_wisconsin_whitewater_19271124_english_1&df=1&dt=10; Haney, Campus Cornerstones, 99. 

[5]  “A Tribute,” Whitewater Register, November 24, 1927. https://irvinlyoung.advantage-preservation.com/viewer/?k=%22upham%22&i=f&by=1927&bdd=1920&d=01011927-12311927&m=between&ord=k1&fn=the_whitewater_press_usa_wisconsin_whitewater_19271124_english_1&df=1&dt=10.

[6]  “Science Equipment Moved as Science Hall Nears Completion,” The Royal Purple, June 18, 1963. https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.32934856.

Posted in Archives & ARC | Comments Off on Warhawk Almanac: Arthur Upham

Warhawk Almanac: The Legacy of Gary J. Lenox

Suppose you have visited the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater at Rock County. In that case, you may have noticed a circular-shaped building with many large, picturesque windows as you enter the parking lot. This building, situated within Allen Hall, is recognized as the Gary J. Lenox Library. But who was Gary Lenox, and what made his name worthy of labeling the UW-Rock County Library?

Lenox Library Outside

Gary J. Lenox was the first librarian on the University of Wisconsin-Rock County campus and stayed in that position for 30 years. Before UW-Rock County, he earned his bachelor’s in English from the University of Minnesota. He later completed a master’s in library science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1966.[1] He was included in the early preparation of the university and played a pivotal role in developing the university’s library resources. During the first semester of campus operations, the campus acknowledged the library as one of the student’s favorite campus places, despite incomplete shelving and collections.[2] In 1972, the library had grown to 35,000 volumes and was noted as the largest in the UW Center System, largely thanks to Lenox.[3]

Gary Lenox at desk

Lenox in stacks

Lenox was a unique style of librarian, especially for his time. He fiercely believed in students’ intellectual freedom and worked tirelessly to meet the needs of his students.[4] He believed that library collections should have all types of materials available to students, even those that may be questionable. He said, “How can one know what’s good if one has nothing with which to compare it?”.[5] These beliefs drove him to develop extensive collections that would allow students to explore the bounds of their curiosity, both academically and recreationally.[6] Lenox would continue to advocate for intellectual freedom for students until he suddenly passed away at the bookstore he owned in Delavan, WI, in 1996.[7] Lenox’s death shocked the campus and the surrounding community, and they quickly responded by pushing to have the library memorialize Lenox’s legacy.[8] Many university libraries wear titles in honor of members of the Board of Regents or other higher officials, not the librarians who help them operate. Still, Lenox’s influence was enough to justify the name change.

Lenox Construction

Inside Lenox Library

In 2008, the campus celebrated the opening of Allen Hall, which connected the previously isolated Hyatt-Smith Hall and Andrews Hall. This building also included an updated, modern library that would continue to honor Gary Lenox.[9] Gary Lenox solidified intellectual freedom into the culture of the UW-Rock County campus. The library remains a student-focused space and continues to advocate for intellectual freedom today.   


[1] Duane Millard, “Gary Lenox: Teacher Feature…”, The Matrix, May 2, 1968, 4. https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.34666540 (accessed on July 7, 2023).

[2] “UW Campus Opens, a Milestone in Education Here”, Janesville Daily Gazette, December 31, 1966, 6D. https://access-newspaperarchive-com.libproxy.uww.edu:9443/us/wisconsin/janesville/janesville-daily-gazette/1966/12-31/page-101/ (accessed on July 7, 2023). 

[3] “UWRC library’s 35,000 volumes: largest in Center System”, The Matrix, February 11, 1972, 7. https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.34666561 (accessed on July 7, 2023).

[4] Ibid, 7.

[5] Millard, “Gary Lenox”, 4. 

[6] “Library: Place for Casual Study”, The Matrix, undated, 11. https://www.jstor.org/stable/community.35002579 (accessed on July 7, 2023).

[7] Scott Milfred, “An arts legacy: Community praises Lenox for contributions”, Janesville Daily Gazette, August 22, 1996, 1. https://access-newspaperarchive-com.libproxy.uww.edu:9443/us/wisconsin/janesville/janesville-gazette/1996/08-22/ (accessed on July 7, 2023).

[8] “911/Commission debate may not be over yet”, Janesville Daily Gazette, November 22, 1996, 11. https://access-newspaperarchive-com.libproxy.uww.edu:9443/us/wisconsin/janesville/janesville-gazette/1996/11-22/page-11/ (accessed on July 7, 2023).

[9] “New Allen Hall Offers Places to Learn, Study and Connect on Campus”, Janesville Daily Gazette, April 13, 2008, 22. https://access-newspaperarchive-com.libproxy.uww.edu:9443/us/wisconsin/janesville/janesville-gazette/2008/04-13/page-22/ (accessed on July 7, 2023).

Posted in Archives & ARC | Comments Off on Warhawk Almanac: The Legacy of Gary J. Lenox

Warhawk Almanac: Lucy Baker

Lucy Baker arrived at Whitewater Normal School (now UW-Whitewater) in 1894 and taught for 43 years. She was initially hired as the school’s music teacher, but quickly accomplished much more. Some of her first achievements were organizing the school’s first glee club in 1903, and a girl’s chorus group called “Treble Clef” in 1909.[1] Since, “soon after the turn of the century the term ‘music department’ came into use to refer to the combined efforts of all group that performed for the benefit of the institution” Miss Baker organized a full band and orchestra in 1912. [2] Throughout the 1920s and 1930s Miss Baker continued to expand the music department. The Glee Club ranged from 30 to 90 students at any given point and began meeting at after school rehearsals. An A Capella Choir was formed as well as another Choral Club that became known as the “little sister” to the Treble Clef group. [3] The music department received a promotion in 1931 as all extracurricular music activities were put on a credit basis.”[4] Shortly before Miss Baker retired in 1937, a Piano Club was founded in 1934. This club eventually became Zeta Eta Theta in 1941.[5] Miss Baker was also influential for all women on campus. When the first two female basketball teams were formed in 1899, Miss Baker was one of the first supporters.[6]

Lucy Baker ca. 1916 from 1916 Minnieska page 12.

            Lucy Baker returned to campus February 18, 1952 to celebrate the building of a new dormitory that would be named in her honor. The ceremonies were arranged by the Women’s Self-Governing Association and included a parade of the Independent Women and each sorority represented by 15 girls, and were preceded by six trumpeters. The parade went from the Graham Street Entrance to the site of the dorm.[7] 

Lucy Baker Hall
Lucy Baker and President Hyer breaking ground on the site of the East Wing ca. 1932.

            The Student Involvement Award has recently been renamed to reflect the legacy Lucy Baker left on UW-Whitewater. The Lucy Baker award is “presented to less than 1% of UW-Whitewater undergraduate students who have served campus and surrounding community in an exemplary fashion.”[8] The students who are awarded this honor are noted for their active leadership and “providing service and programming for their peers, much how Lucy did for her students.”[9]

Lucy Baker ca. 1936 from 1936 Minnieska page 18.

[1] M. Jannette Bohi, A History of Wisconsin State University Whitewater 1868-1986 (Whitewater: Whitewater State University Foundation Inc., 1967), 86.

[2] M. Jannette Bohi, A History of Wisconsin State University Whitewater 1868-1986 (Whitewater: Whitewater State University Foundation Inc., 1967), 87.

[3] M. Jannette Bohi, A History of Wisconsin State University Whitewater 1868-1986 (Whitewater: Whitewater State University Foundation Inc., 1967), 168.

[4] M. Jannette Bohi, A History of Wisconsin State University Whitewater 1868-1986 (Whitewater: Whitewater State University Foundation Inc., 1967), 168.

[5] M. Jannette Bohi, A History of Wisconsin State University Whitewater 1868-1986 (Whitewater: Whitewater State University Foundation Inc., 1967), 168.

[6] M. Jannette Bohi, A History of Wisconsin State University Whitewater 1868-1986 (Whitewater: Whitewater State University Foundation Inc., 1967), 111.

[7] M. Jannette Bohi, A History of Wisconsin State University Whitewater 1868-1986 (Whitewater: Whitewater State University Foundation Inc., 1967), 196.

[8] “Campus Awards,” University of Wisconsin Whitewater james R. Connor University Center, Univeristy of Wisconsin Whitewater, effective 2022, https://www.uww.edu/uc/get-involved/campus-awards#lucy-baker-involvement-award.

[9] “Campus Awards,” University of Wisconsin Whitewater james R. Connor University Center, Univeristy of Wisconsin Whitewater, effective 2022, https://www.uww.edu/uc/get-involved/campus-awards#lucy-baker-involvement-award.

Posted in Archives & ARC | Tagged | Comments Off on Warhawk Almanac: Lucy Baker

Warhawk Almanac: The First Summer Session

In 1899, Whitewater Normal School (now UW-Whitewater) opened for its first summer session. Running from July 5th to August 5th teachers from all parts of the state were expected to show up and take advantage of “the Normal School equipment.” [1] During the summer session the school also offered a Model Class for teachers to work with like they did during the normal school year. [2] This first session only had five instructors and was attended by 90 students. This continued for two years and then lapsed for two years after that. [3]

SummerSchool
Article about the 1905 Summer School Session from The Royal Purple.

In 1907, when the seventh annual summer session was held the session ran for six weeks beginning July 8th. This session included a “special set of primary courses for primary teachers who may obtain a new certificate, without examination by attending a two weeks’ course in Primary methods.” [4] By 1925, the summer session was streamlined for Commercial Teachers and added special courses in Vocation and Part-Time schooling. [5] For the 2023 summer session Whitewater is offering three-, six-, nine-, or twelve-week courses running May 22-August 12. Students can use the summer session as a way to improve their GPA by retaking a course or as a way to stay on track (or get ahead) in graduation requirements. In fact, “Students who take summer courses are 21% more likely to graduate in four years. [6]

[1] “The Summer School,” The Whitewater Register (Whitewater), May 25th, 1899.
[2] “The Summer School,” The Whitewater Register (Whitewater), May 25th, 1899.
[3] “Summer School,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), April 1st, 1907.
[4] “Summer School,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), April 1st, 1907.
[5] “Special Courses Planned for Summer School Session,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), February 4th, 1925.
[6] “Summer Session,” Summer Session 2023, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, effective December 8, 2022, https://www.uww.edu/ce/summer.

Posted in Archives & ARC | Tagged | Comments Off on Warhawk Almanac: The First Summer Session

Warhawk Almanac: Two-Time National Champions!

The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater baseball team has won the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) Division III national championship twice in their 38 seasons. Their first NCAA win was in 2005. “The Warhawks, 45-7, were ranked number one in the ABCA (American Baseball Coaches Association)/Collegiate Baseball Newspaper poll the last six weeks for [the] regular season, while setting school records for victories and winning percentages.” [1] Overall, 2005 was a great year for the baseball team for they won seven out of the eight total national champion games [2], and the high of that win continued into the next season. However, the Warhawks would not win another NCAA national championship until 2014.

Baseball Champions 2005 Team
2005 National Champions, ca. 2005, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Athletics, Whitewater, WI, https://uwwsports.com/sports/2012/3/27/GEN_0327122239.aspx#2005%20Baseball

The year 2014 was an amazing one for UW-Whitewater athletics. Both the football and basketball teams won their NCAA national championship titles earlier that year and so when the baseball team won their NCAA national championship title, UW-Whitewater became the first school in NCAA history to win all three championships in one year. [3] The Warhawks beat Emory University 7-0, to clinch the College World Series. Warhawk pitcher Scott Plaza was named the Most Outstanding Player of the Division III World Series because he threw seven hits and nine strikeouts in the game shutout. [4] The team completed the National Championship with 8 wins and zero loses, as well as an All Time NCAA Championship Record of 75-47. [5] The team was welcomed home with a ceremony at Prucha Field at James B. Miller Stadium and took the traditional parade through town on a fire truck. [6]

Alex Saager, 2014 National Champions Celebration Pictures, ca. 2014, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Athletics, Whitewater, WI, https://uwwsports.com/news/2014/5/27/BSB_0527143414.aspx

[1] Tom Fick, “Reinhard Named National Pitcher of the Year: Four Warhawks earn all-American Honors,” Whitewater Register (Whitewater), June 1, 2005.
[2] “Baseball NCAA Championship History,” Baseball, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Athletics, effective July 18, 2022, baseball NCAA championship history (PDF) – University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Athletics (uwwsports.com).
[3] Justin St. Peter, “Baseball: UWW wins world series, completes trifecta,” Royal Purple (Whitewater), May 28, 2014.
[4] Justin St. Peter, “Baseball: UWW wins world series, completes trifecta,” Royal Purple (Whitewater), May 28, 2014.
[5] “Baseball NCAA Championship History,” Baseball, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Athletics, effective July 18, 2022, baseball NCAA championship history (PDF) – University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Athletics (uwwsports.com).
[6] “Welcome Home for Champs,” University of Wisconsin Whitewater Athletics (Whitewater), May 27, 2014.

Posted in Archives & ARC | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Warhawk Almanac: Two-Time National Champions!

ChatGPT recap (with citations)

Since going live in October 2022, ChatGPT, the artificial intelligence chatbot, has brought conversations about the ethics, utility, and accuracy of AI text generators to the fore. It has also started parallel conversations on the threat that AI poses to certain occupations. 

In academic circles, these conversations seem to revolve around the incorporation of ChatGPT in the classroom and how this will affect student integrity. At present the opinions seem to fall on a continuum between embracing the technology and banning it completely. Some faculty want to encourage the use of ChatGPT as a way to keep up with rapidly changing technology (McMurtrie, 2023). Some faculty want to completely ban its use in any type of learning environment because it signals the end of critical thinking (Metha, 2023). These past few months have shown us that ChatGPT and its contemporaries are here to stay, and will probably be widely used by students.

So what have we as academic librarians learned about ChatGPT?

ChatGPT works on programmed knowledge. Therefore, originality, creativity and innovation are terms which cannot be applied to any of the works produced by the chatbot. This means that it may be very easy to detect a plagiarized ChatGPT assignment based on context and relevance (Marr, 2023). We have discovered that students are inadvertently learning a key information literacy skill: how to refine key terms by asking ChatGPT to produce an output tailored to their specific needs. 

ChatGPT does not provide accurate information. The creators of ChatGPT have acknowledged this fact on their website when discussing the limitations of the chatbot (Kim, 2022). We have also learned from first hand experience that the chatbot may create its own sources and citations instead of citing existing credible sources. Even worse, it creates a mashup of invented citations and actual citations, thus giving the user a false sense of confidence. 

Anything produced by ChatGPT is copyrighted but we are not sure who owns the copyright (McKendrick, 2022). The US copyright office has ruled that AI generated material does not fulfill the human authorship requirement in order to be eligible for a copyright claim (Copyright Registration Guidance: Works Containing Material Generated by Artificial Intelligence, 2023). The content generated by the chatbot is still subject to the license, and terms of use of the company which owns it. These terms of use may place the content created by ChatGPT in the public domain at present, but that may be subject to change. Some academics are debating the ethics of including the AI as a co-author. Given all this uncertainty, we recommend that you cite any artificial intelligence generated material as a source .The following is an example of a citation of a ChatGPT output in APA style.

Artificial Intelligence. (2022). Would a better reference for the abstract be if I were to cite you as the author? ChatGPT. https://chat.openai.com/auth/login.

In text citation may be as follows:

 “The abstract is a hypothetical example that I generated based on my understanding of the topic” (Artificial Intelligence, 2022). 

(Updated July 13, 2023). According to McAdoo (2023) of the APA Style Blog,

“The reference and in-text citations for ChatGPT are formatted as follows:

OpenAI. (2023). ChatGPT (Mar 14 version) [Large language model]. https://chat.openai.com/chat

  • Parenthetical citation: (OpenAI, 2023)
  • Narrative citation: OpenAI (2023)”

I, Rebecca Paulraj, do affirm that this blog post was not created by or edited by an artificial intelligence text generator. 

References

Copyright Registration Guidance: Works Containing Material Generated by Artificial Intelligence. 88 Fed. Reg. 16190 (March 16, 2023) (37 CFR Part 202). 

Kim, T. (2022, Dec 15). ChatGPT Is amazing—and totally overrated. Barron’s (Online). https://www.barrons.com/articles/chatgpt-problems-flaws-51671060494

Marr, B. (2023, Mar 3). The top 10 limitations of ChatGPT. Forbes (Online). https://www.forbes.com/sites/bernardmarr/2023/03/03/the-top-10-limitations-of-chatgpt/?sh=786f9f408f35

McAdoo, T. (2023, April 7). How to cite ChatGPT. APA Style. https://apastyle.apa.org/blog/how-to-cite-chatgpt

McKendrick, J. (2022, Dec 21). Who ultimately owns content generated by ChatGPT and other AI platforms? Forbes (Online). https://www.forbes.com/sites/joemckendrick/2022/12/21/who-ultimately-owns-content-generated-by-chatgpt-and-other-ai-platforms/?sh=5f2ee30f5423

McMurtrie, B. (2023, March 31). ChatGPT is already upending campus practices. Colleges are rushing to respond. Chronicle of Higher Education, 69(15), 11.

Mehta, R. (2023, May). A ban on ChatGPT does more harm than good. MIT Technology Review, 126, 20-21. 

Posted in uncategorized | Tagged , | Comments Off on ChatGPT recap (with citations)