Warhawk Almanac: Who Were the Whitewater Four?

During the late 1960s and early 1970s the Whitewater campus was buzzing with student protests, but not for the reason you might think. On Thursday, February 26, 1970, Dr. Robert Burrows was removed as the chairman of the English Department by University President Dr. William Carter. Dr. Carter removed Dr. Burrows because he felt that Dr. Burrows and his “executive committee…[were] working to create a completely autonomous Department of English.” [1] However, the reasoning behind the removal was not made explicit to the staff or students until after Dr. Burrows was removed. This caused mass protesting from students and staff alike. As protesting continued, four more English Department professors were removed from their positions. They would later become known as The Whitewater Four. [2]

Robert Burrows
Robert Burrows, 1971, in 1971 Minnieska (Whitewater: Univeristy of Wisconsin Whitewater, 1971).

Doctors William Lafferty, Vlad Thomas, George Adams, and Richard Adamany were removed from their teaching positions Monday, March 2, 1970. These professors were removed because they were involved in political events happening around the campus, openly defying Dr. Carter’s orders not to. Dr. Thomas admitted in his trial that he “was one of the faculty members that signed an anti-war ad,” [3] but then later drafted an AAUP (American Association of University Professors) resolution targeting the right for everybody on a college campus to have freedom of speech.

‘A question of academic freedom’ announcement, ca. 1961-1973, University of Wisconsin—Madison Archives, Madison, Wisconsin, https://digital.library.wisc.edu/1711.dl/ADFRZR6LNWCR38L.

The Whitewater Four professors all wrote articles expressing their feelings towards Dr. Carter and his handling of Dr. Burrow’s removal, again defying Dr. Carter. They believed that because they were in tenured positions nothing would affect their job security, and they certainly didn’t think they would end up facing charges. However, Dr. Carter pressed charges against the professors, citing that he “had received complaints, which called into question their professional and, their behavior during that period, February 26th through March 2nd, and that [he] considered them substantial enough that [he] was going to proceed with the case against them.” [4] At that point the professors knew where they stood [5] and that their case would be going to trial. While the trial did not conclude in an efficient manner (meaning nothing was decided and there was no “winner”) the Professors were reinstated to the University on March 9, 1970, and Dr. Carter remained the University President and UW-Whitewater’s first Chancellor until 1974.

Vlad Thomas
Vlad Thomas, 1971, in 1971 Minnieska (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, 1971), 173-174.
Richard Adamany
Richard Adamany, 1971, in 1971 Minnieska (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, 1971), 173-174.
George 
Adams
George Adams, 1971, in 1971 Minnieska (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, 1971), 173-174.
William Lafferty
William Lafferty, 1971, in 1971 Minnieska (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, 1971), 173-174.

[1] “Carter, Burrows Responds to List of Questions,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), March 5, 1970.
[2] “Carter Suspends English Teachers,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), March 5, 1970.
[3] Vlad Thomas, Richard Adamany, William Lafferty, and George Adams v. Wisconsin State University (Transcript of Proceedings January 25, 1971) at 69.
[4] Vlad Thomas, Richard Adamany, William Lafferty, and George Adams v. Wisconsin State University (Transcript of Proceedings January 25, 1971) at 182.
[5] Vlad Thomas, Richard Adamany, William Lafferty, and George Adams v. Wisconsin State University (Transcript of Proceedings January 25, 1971) at 90-90.

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Warhawk Almanac: The Opening of Moraine Dinning Hall

The mid to late 1960s was a big time period in terms of the dinning options at UW-Whitewater. Many students were accustomed to eating at the Union Cafeteria, but that all changed January of 1964. Using funds provided by the Housing and Home Financing Agency, UW-Whitewater was able to begin construction on a new dining hall. [1] Named after the “Kettle Moraine in the Whitewater area.” Moraine Dining Hall would be constructed “at the end of Graham Street next to Goodhue Hall” and would “serve 500 students every half hour.” [2]

Moraine Dining Hall Completed Announcement

The Moraine Dining Center opened January 26, 1964. The Royal Purple reported that the plan was to have McCutchan Hall and White Hall residents, and all non-dorm students eat at the Union; while Sayles Hall, Goodhue Hall, Baker Hall, Salisbury Hall, and Fischer Hall residents would eat at Moraine during its first semester of operation. The next school year all of the residents living in a dorm under construction and all students living off campus would eat at the Union; while students living everywhere else on campus would eat at Moraine. [3]

Two other dining halls were built soon after Moraine: Drumlin Dining Hall in September 1965 and Esker in February 1969. Because of declining enrollment on campus, Moraine closed in January of 1971 and “was never able to be effectively reopened.” [4] However, the University Center Director, Dan O’Sullivan, and other school officials were already talking of moving the University Book Store into Moraine Dining Hall during the 1971 winter break. The idea was that $100,000 of inventory would “be better displayed and closer to parking at Moraine.” [5] While this move did not happen at the time, Robert Meracle, the manager of the bookstore, cited similar reasons why the University should choose Moraine as the new location in 1972. Meracle said that incoming shipments would have to be transferred “only once instead of the present three times since Moraine has its own loading dock. The site also offers better parking facilities, more windows for displays, and a location closer to the dorms.” Another selling point from Meracle was that with increased space the bookstore could include new products like “coke and cigarette machines.” [6] Despite all of its attributes the bookstore did not move into Moraine until 1975, where it is still housed today. [7]

Moraine Bookstore
Gregg Theune, Moraine Hall, ca. 1990, University of Wisconsin—Whitewater Archives and Area Research Center, Whitewater, WI, https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/AHT6Y4OMEFQQJP9C

[1] University of Wisconsin Whitewater, “Moraine Dining Hall Progressing; to be completed by January 1964,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), October 8, 1963.
[2] University of Wisconsin Whitewater, “Moraine Dining Hall Progressing; to be completed by January 1964,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), October 8, 1963.
[3] University of Wisconsin Whitewater, “Moraine Dining Center to Open,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), January 14, 1964.
[4] University of Wisconsin Whitewater, “Going back to the little red schoolhouse,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), February 14, 1973.
[5] University of Wisconsin Whitewater, “New legislation passed,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), December 14, 1971.
[6] University of Wisconsin Whitewater, “Union bookstore relocates for more efficient service,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), February 22, 1972.
[7] University of Wisconsin Whitewater, “Letters to The Editor,” The Royal Purple (Whitewater), March 26, 1975.

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Wharhawk Almanac: The First Winterim

Many universities and colleges offer some sort of education during the winter break period. This is often known as a January term, named after the month it takes place. The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater offered its first set of winter classes, called “Winterim” in January 1996. Winterim began as “an accelerated session of courses, Jan. 2-17,” initially offering 16 classes where students could choose one and each class would meet Monday-Friday, 8:30-11:30 a.m. [1] Provost and Vice Chancellor Kay Schallenkamp said that the program “was requested by students who wanted a greater flexibility in scheduling their courses.” She also believed that the development of such a program demonstrated “the strong cooperation between administration, faculty and students.” [2] By its third year of existence, Whitewater increased the available classes to 31; most of them were still general education classes. [3] However, it was reported in The Whitewater Register that in 1997 over 400 undergraduate students, including part-time and non-traditional, enrolled in a Winterim class.

1990 Students Walking To Class
Students walking to class
Gregg Theune, Alumni Center, ca. 1990, UW-Madison Digital Archives, UW-Whitewater Collection, Whitewater, WI, https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/ATG3OZVCRNMRSV8C

Almost thirty years later, UW-Whitewater is still offering a Winterim session. It is a “three-week session [that] offers intensive courses allowing students to advance, keep up or catch up.” [4] The classes offered now are typically general education classes and, since 2022, the class all meet virtually.

Winter 2022 Hyland Through Trees
Winter 2021, Hyland Hall
University of Wisconsin Whitewater, Hyland Hall Through the Trees, ca. 2021, Facebook, University of… – University of Wisconsin-Whitewater (facebook.com)

[1] “UW-W Announces New Winterim Session,” Whitewater Register, November 28, 1996.
[2] “UW-W Announces New Winterim Session,” Whitewater Register, November 28, 1996.
[3] “Registration open for Winterim Session,” Whitewater Register, December 3, 1998.
[4] Carina Lopez, “Dashing through winterim,” Royal Purple, December 12, 2021.

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Warhawk Almanac: Winning the National Championships

At the beginning of the 2007 football season, the Warhawk Football Team started with both a new coach and a new starting quarterback. With these big changes, the 2007 season was going to be a challenge.

Warhawk Football Huddle
Anderson Library Archives and Area Research, Anderson Library, University of Wisconsin – Whitewater, Whitewater, WI.

The Whitewater Warhawks Football Team made it into the playoffs with a 14-1 winning record. In early December of 2007, the Warhawks football team won the semi-final playoff game against Mary-Hardin Baylor.[1] After winning the semi-finals, the Warhawks were able to play in the National Championship at the Amos Alonzo Stagg Bowl in Salem, Virginia. The Warhawks played Mount Union College Rangers on December 13, 2007. It was the third time the Warhawks would face the Rangers at the National Championships. The previous championships in 2005 and 2006 were both won by the Mount Union Rangers. The third time was the charm for the Warhawks, when they won the National Championships for the first time in Whitewater’s history.[2]

Warhawk Football National Champion Celebration
Warhawk Football Team 2007 National Champions, 2001, in 2001 Royal Purple (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, Dec. 19, 2007), 1

The team was led by senior starting quarterback Justin Beaver. Beaver told The Whitewater Register “all season long, we had fans, cheerleaders, the band, who all came out to our games and supported us. We won this title not just for us, but for the entire community. They deserve it.”[3] Justin Beaver was awarded the NCAA Division III Player of the Year and the Gagliardi Award for his time on the football team. Since 2007, the Whitewater Warhawks have won a total of six National Championship Titles.


[1] “Warhawks return to Stagg Bowl for National Championship,” The Whitewater Register. (Whitewater, WI.) Dec. 30, 2007.

[2] “Third time is a charm: Beaver leads Warhawks to national championship,” The Whitewater Register, (Whiteater, WI.) Dec. 20, 2007.

[3] [3] “Purple Reign: ‘Hawks land first national championship,” Royal Purple, (Whitewater, WI.) Dec. 19, 2007.

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Last Sale Books of 2022

The latest batch of fresh books have now graced the sturdy book sale cart shelves. There are philosophy, computer science, juvenile fiction, psychology, and speech therapy books, along with titles in a smattering of other areas.

Come, peruse, and purchase. Once again, the cost is just $1 each. On Dec. 25–technically Dec. 27 when the library reopens for winter break–the price goes down to $.25 each. That will last until the newest batch of books goes out on January 17.

Special this month are a few thin items, mostly maps. Those are free, first come first serve.

Assorted piles of books

May your exams go well and your winter break and winterim be full of happiness.

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Warhawk Almanac: Frank S. Hyer

Most students on the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater campus often associate “Hyer” with the academic building across from the library. Today Hyer Hall is home to classrooms, Financial Aid, the Cashiers Office, and offices for faculty and staff.  What many students do not know is that Hyer Hall is named after a former President of the University, Frank S. Hyer. President Hyer served the campus as the sixth president from 1919 until his departure in November of 1930.

President Hyer
Anderson Library Archives and Area Research, Anderson Library, University of Wisconsin – Whitewater, Whitewater, WI.

Frank S. Hyer grew up in Wisconsin and attended Milwaukee State Teachers College (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) and Ripon college. Following graduation, Hyer spent twenty-five years in a variety of positions teaching schools in before coming to Whitewater. Hyer left his position as principal of the training school at UW-Stevens Point when he was appointed president of the college in 1919 and was chosen for his initiatives to further Whitewater’s prosperity.[1]

During his eleven-year tenure, Frank S. Hyer oversaw many accomplishments and improvements to the campus. Enrollment reached one thousand between the years 1923 and 1925. These had been the highest enrollment numbers since the college opened in 1868. To accommodate the growing student population, President Hyer broke ground for the East Wing of Old Main in 1924. In 1927, Whitewater Normal School’s name was changed to Whitewater Teachers College after the college began to offer four-year degrees because of high enrollment under Hyer’s administration. Through these accomplishments, President Hyer was able to grow Whitewater Teachers College from the smallest normal school in the state to the second largest normal school.[2]

President Hyer
Anderson Library Archives and Area Research, Anderson Library, University of Wisconsin – Whitewater, Whitewater, WI.

Frank S. Hyer announced his departure from campus in August 1930 and officially left on November 1, 1930.[3] After leaving Whitewater, he returned to Stevens Point where he retired from UW-Stevens Point in 1937. When Old Main caught fire in February 1970, the East Wing suffered the least amount of damage. The surviving portion was renovated and renamed Hyer Hall, in honor of Frank S. Hyer.[4] A residence hall at UW-Stevens Point is also named Frank S. Hyer Hall, making him the only president to have two buildings named after him in the state of Wisconsin.


[1] M. Janette Bohi, A History of Wisconsin State University Whitewater 1868-1968 (Whitewater, WI: Wisconsin State University Foundation, 1067, 146.

[2] M. Janette Bohi, A History of Wisconsin State University Whitewater 1868-1968 (Whitewater, WI: Wisconsin State University Foundation, 1067, 150.

[3] “Mr. Hyer Resigns To Head Stevens Point College,” The Royal Purple, (Whitewater, WI) Sept. 15, 1930.

[4] “Rename ‘Old Main’ East Wing Hyer Hall As Honor To 6th President,” The Whitewater Register, (Whitewater, WI) July, 30, 1970.

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Warhawk Almanac: Beginning of the Royal Purple

The first edition of the Royal Purple was released in early November 1901 at the Whitewater Normal School (now the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater). The paper was originally started as a monthly literary newspaper and was sold for seventy-five cents a copy.[1]

Royal Purple First Cover
The Royal Purple, 1901, in 1901 Royal Purple (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, November, 1901), 1

The first edition of the Royal Purple covers different events happening on campus in November and December of 1901. The “Aureolan Notes” updates the Whitewater community on the Aureola Society on their member numbers. The Aureola Society was started three years before, in 1898, as a literary society. The organization still exists today but was renamed Alpha Sigma Sorority in 1931. There are also several different short stories within the first edition including “In Old Virginia and “Spreading Summer.” The first edition also includes information about other campus organization meetings, sports updates, and advertisements for local businesses.[2]

Royal Purple Student Staff
Organizations, 1968, in 1968 Minnieska (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, 1968), 194

Since 1901, the Royal Purple has had some changes over the years. The paper changed from quarterly to a weekly newspaper in 1913. The December 14, 1967 edition of the newspaper featured color in its front page for the first time in the paper’s history.[3] Today, articles for the Royal Purple are published every Monday on their website. Paper copies are also distributed quarterly around the campus and the city of Whitewater. The Royal Purple office is currently located in McCutchan hall and now has been a campus organization for over a hundred and twenty years.[4]

Singular Royal Purple staff member
Anderson Library Archives and Area Research, Anderson Library, University of Wisconsin – Whitewater, Whitewater, WI.

Anderson Library Archives and Area Research, Anderson Library, University of Wisconsin – Whitewater, Whitewater, WI. 

Ogranizations, 1968, in 1968 Minnieska (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, 1968), 194

The Royal Purple, 2001, in 1901 Royal Purple (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, 1901), 1


[1] “About” Royal Purple, retrieved from https://royalpurplenews.com/about/office/.

[2] Royal Purple (Whitewater, WI.) November 1901.

[3] Penny Meuhl, eds., Minnieska (Whitewater, WI: UW-Whitewater, 1968) 59:194.

[4] “About” Royal Purple, retrieved from https://royalpurplenews.com/about/office/.

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Book Sale Refresher

New books were put on the book sale cart today. Everything there is fresh and new (for older and used books anyway!) Subjects include the arts, communication, computers, economics, and education. As always, a few random gems in other subject areas might have snuck in.

These books could be yours for the low, low cost of just $1.00 each. The reduced price sale will begin on November 25

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Warhawk Almanac: Amelia Earhart Visits Campus

Amelia Earhart is one of the many famous people to have visited Whitewater’s campus. The Royal Purple published on October 23, 1933, advertised Earhart’s upcoming lecture on campus stating “there is probably not a man, woman, or child in America who has not heard this famous name.”[1] At the time, Amelia Earhart was known for being the first woman to fly across the Atlantic, setting speed records for women, and writing two books about her own experiences as an aviator.[2] Today, many of us know her for her attempt to fly around the globe. It was during this attempt that her plane was lost and Amelia Earhart’s remains have not been found.

Earhart in the Royal Purple
Amelia Earheart to Speak At First Lecture Course, 1933, in 1933 Royal Purple (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, Oct. 23, 1933).

Amelia Earhart gave her lecture to the students of the Wisconsin Normal School-Whitewater, now UW-Whitewater, on October 25th. Amelia Earhart was the first of a five-part lecture series for the 1933-1934 school year. To attend all five lectures, only cost $1.25 or $0.25 per lecture. Lectures following Earhart’s focused on music and theater. Earhart was chosen to speak to make the course “quite largely dramatic.”[3] Earhart’s lecture was very popular among the students and faculty at Whitewater. The auditorium was completely filled for the lecture. Audience members commented on how Earhart conducted her lecture in an informal way that put the audience at ease.[4] She also showed several pictures of her flights. When asked what she considered the greatest factor in her success, Earhart said that sixty percent of her success was due to preparation.[5] After her lecture, the Whitewater Register reported that “it is too much to expect that any of them (lecturers) will make the hit scored here by the modest Amelia.”[6]

Amelia Earhart Article
Bargains in Entertainment, 1933, in 1933 Whitewater Register (Whitewater, WI, Nov. 2, 1933).


[1] “Amelia Earhart to Speak At First Lecture Course.” Royal Purple (Whitewater, WI.) Oct. 23, 1933.

[2] “Amelia Earheart to Speak At First Lecture Course.” Royal Purple (Whitewater, WI.) Oct. 23, 1933.

[3] “Bargains in Entertainment!,” Whitewater Register (Whitewater, WI) Oct. 12, 1933.

[4] “Miss Earhart Gives Fine Lecture,” Royal Purple (Whitewater, WI.) Oct. 30, 1933.

[5] “Miss Earhart Gives Fine Lecture,” Royal Purple (Whitewater, WI.) Oct. 30, 1933.

[6] Whitewater Register (Whitewater, WI) Nov. 2, 1933.

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Warhawk Almanac: Alpha Gamma Delta Returns

In 1936 Wisconsin State College – Whitewater welcomed multiple new Greek chapters to campus, including Theta Sigma Upsilon Sorority. The Rho chapter was founded by fifteen charter members and remained on campus until 1960.[1] In spring of 1960, Theta Sigma Upsilon was officially merged with Alpha Gamma Delta Women’s Fraternity, the first international Greek organization on Whitewater’s campus. The Rho chapter officially became the Beta Theta chapter.

Early Alpha Gamma Delta members
Alpha Gamma Delta, 1961, in 1961 Minnieska (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, 1961), 101.

The Beta Theta chapter participated in many campus activities and held events of their own every year. The women of the chapter held annual mother-father-daughter banquets, formals, and pledge parties. Their main service project was the annual basketball marathon where all proceeds from the event were donated to the Wisconsin Badger Camp.[2] The chapter members were also very active in campus organizations and homecoming. In 1980, Alpha Gamma Delta won first place for their house decorations and received the Chancellor’s Spirit Award.[3] The chapter’s house was originally on Main Street but later moved to one of the four newly built Greek houses on Fraternity Lane.[4] As the Beta Theta chapter celebrated their 25th year on Whitewater’s campus, they also celebrated their last.[5] The chapter officially left campus at the end of 1980 due to low membership numbers.

Alpha Gamma Delta House
Alpha Gamma Delta, 1960, in 1960 Minnieska (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, 1960), 64.

Twenty-seven years later, the Beta Theta chapter was reinstalled at UW-Whitewater. The founding members of the sorority were initiated in October of 2017. This October celebrates the fifth anniversary of their return to campus. Today, the women of the sorority continue to participate in homecoming and to support their philanthropy. The chapter won the Homecoming Spirit Cup in 2020 and placed first in the 2021 homecoming talent show. Members still host the annual BBQ Bash with Lambda Chi Alpha and Block Out Hunger to raise awareness for their philanthropy, Fighting Hunger. The chapter is now housed at 164 North Prairie Street and has grown to a membership of over 57 women. The current Beta Theta chapter members strive to remember the members before them and to uphold their motto, “Loving, Leading, Lasting.”

Alpha Gamma Delta group members
Alpha Gamma Delta, 1979, in 1979 Minnieska (Whitewater: University of Wisconsin Whitewater, 1979), 152.


[1] Gertrude Zirbes, eds., Minnieska (Whitewater, WI: UW-Whitewater, 1937), 7:92.

[2] Irene Dries and Mary Liz Trewyn, eds., Minnieska (Whitewater, WI: UW-Whitewater, 1960), 51:63-65.

[3] Fran Geimer, ed., Minnieska (Whitewater, WI: UW-Whitewater, 1980), 72: 82.

[4] “Four New Greek Houses Will Be Ready by September 1,” Royal Purple (Whitewater, WI.) July 12, 1960.

[5] Fran Geimer, ed., Minnieska (Whitewater, WI: UW-Whitewater, 1980), 72: 82.


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