Thanksgiving Hours (Library, Café) 2017

clip art of horn of plentyPlan ahead! Hours of the Andersen Library and Food for Thought Café are affected by the Thanksgiving holiday.

The Food for Thought Café will be closed Wed. through Fri., Nov. 22-24 (and closed on the weekend, as is usual).

Andersen Library’s hours for the holiday week are:

  • Mon.-Tues., Nov. 20-21: normal hours (7:30am-2am)
  • Wed., Nov. 22nd: 7:30am-6pm
  • Thurs., Nov. 23rd: CLOSED
  • Fri., Nov. 24th: 8am-4:30pm
  • Sat., Nov. 25th: CLOSED
  • Sun., Nov. 26th: 3pm-2am

Please remember that even when the physical Library is closed, you can:

    • Search the article databases (login when prompted with your campus Net-ID, same as for your campus email or D2L) or Research@UWW (sign in to access all possible full text),
    • Search the Library holdings of Books, Media and more and use links to online titles
    • Renew checked-out books, government documents, etc. through My Account (unless you’ve already used up your allowed renewals),
    • Consult online guides for help, including citation guides for APA, MLA, and Turabian format, and class assignment guides, and
    • Ask a librarian for help using email or chat (UWW librarians respond to the emails when the Library is open, but chat is covered 24/7 by non-UWW staff).

Happy Thanksgiving! Please be safe: Drive safely (tips from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration), cook that turkey safely (tips from the U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services’ “FoodSafety.gov”), and see ReadyWisconsin’s “Are You Ready for Thanksgiving?” for more safety tips.

FDLP logo Andersen Library is a federal and Wisconsin depository library with federal and state government documents on a variety of current and relevant issues available to you in various formats (print, DVD/CD-ROM, online). Check out your government at Andersen Library!

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Native American Spirituality

Mr. Randall Cornelius will talk about Native American Spirituality on Thurs., Nov. 16th, 2017, from 3:30-4:30pm in UC 275A. It’s part of the Native Pride Lecture Series. Preceding the talk will be a reception from 1-3:30pm in the UC Warhawk Connection Center, at which attendees will have opportunities to learn a bit more about Native American culture through playing Kahoot, making dreamcatchers, and more.

book coverAndersen Library resources may help you to learn more, including books such as Native American spirituality: A critical reader (3rd-floor Main Collection, E98.R3 N382 2000 or online via ProQuest Ebook Central; preview some text via Google Books) and articles including “Urban American Indian youth spirituality and religion: A latent class analysis” (Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 2016, vol.55:no.4, pp.677-697, doi:10.1111/jssr.12298) and “A Native American perspective on spiritual assessment: The strengths and limitations of a complementary set of assessment tools” (Health & Social Work, 2010, vol.35:no.2, pp.121-131, https://academic.oup.com/hsw).

If you’d like assistance with finding additional information, please ask a librarian (choose chat or email, phone 262-472-1032, or visit the Reference Desk).

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Challenges to Health Care Accessibility

Kristin Wallace, Executive Director of the Rock River Free Clinic will talk about “Challenges to Health Care Accessibility” on Thurs., Nov. 16, at 7pm in the Whitewater Municipal Building’s Council Chambers (312 W Whitewater St, Whitewater), hosted by the The League of Women Voters® of the Whitewater Area. This program is free and open to the public, but a collection of non-perishable food items for the Whitewater Food Pantry will also take place at this meeting.

The clinic, located in Jefferson, is a partnership between the clinic’s Board, Fort HealthCare, and Jefferson County’s Heath Department.

book coverIf you would like to learn more, Andersen Library resources may be able to help, with books such as Health care as a social good: Religious values and American democracy (online via Project MUSE), state government information such as the report of the Special Committee on Health Care Access published by the Wisconsin Legislative Council in 2012 (available online or in print in the 2nd-floor Wisconsin Documents collection, LEG 1:2011/13), federal government information such as the “Access to Health Services” information from the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, and articles including “Expanding access to care: Scope of practice laws” (The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, 2017, vol.45:no.1, Suppl., pp.33-36, doi:10.1177/1073110517703316).

If you’d like assistance with finding additional information, please ask a librarian (choose chat or email, phone 262-472-1032, or visit the Reference Desk).

Andersen Library is a federal depository library with federal government documents on a variety of current and relevant issues available to you in various formats (print, DVD/CD-ROM, online). Check out your government at Andersen Library!

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New Stuff Tuesday — Nov. 14, 2017

21 by Adele

21
by Adele
call number: POP Ade 21
New Arrivals Island, 2nd floor

The mega-hit status of Adele’s second album (dating from 2011, but a new addition to our Popular CDs collection) is no secret to anyone who follows the music world – it ranked as the #1 album on Billboard’s list and remains one of the best-selling albums worldwide. While its bookend songs, “Rolling in the deep” and “Someone like you,” became practically radio-immortal for a few years, each of the songs in between has their own unique style and feel that contributes to a moody, volatile, but overall enjoyable record.

Some of the songs have more of a bluesy, folk, gospel, or Americana feel than might be expected out of a British singer, and Adele has said that her exposure to American country on her previous record tour definitely influenced songs like “Don’t you remember.” Despite the whole album being known as a classic breakup album with the expected dark emotions of hurt, anger, revenge, and regret, it also has a range of more positive lyrics that remind the listener of platonic friendships or classic love songs. Even the overplayed singles bear repeated listening in combination with the rest of the record, and it’s not hard to see why it’s so popular.

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Stop the Mines! Speaking Tour

The Stop the Mines! Speaking Tour is making a stop at UW-Whitewater on Wed., Nov. 15, from 6-9pm in Heide 101. Speakers will be Dr. Al Gedicks, executive secretary of the Wisconsin Resources Protection Council, and members of the Menominee Tribe. The tour/event is co-sponsored and organized by several organizations, including UW-Whitewater student organizations Native American Cultural Awareness Association (NACAA), Students Allied for a Green Earth (S.A.G.E.), Peace, Education, and Activism through Creative Engagement (P.E.A.C.E.), Latinos Unidos, and UWW College Dems.

Aquila Resources, a Canadian mining company, has proposed to build the “Back 40″ sulfide mine in Michigan’s upper peninsula (in an area called the Back 40) along the Menominee River, 150 feet from the river banks. Some organizations such as River Alliance of Wisconsin predict that the mine will contaminate the river, endangering drinking water quality and aquatic life. Additional information on the Back 40 Proposed Mine Project, including maps, resource links, and a video of Al Gedicks speaking, is available from the Fox Valley Group of the Sierra Club. A statement by the Chair of the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin said that “Approval of the permit places Industry greed before the health and life-sustaining needs of the people who reside in this area and within the Great Lakes Region” and fails to protect the rich cultural and environmental resources of this area, including tribal burial sites. More information about the Tribe’s opposition to the project is available at the “No Back 40 Mine” web site. You can listen to, or read the transcript of, Wisconsin Public Radio (WPR) news from Oct. 4 “Tension Mounts Over Back Forty Mine As It Nears Final Approval,” which talks about the controversy, including Aquila Resources spokeswoman Chantae Lessard’s claim that the project will “create around 240 jobs in the first year and about $20 million annually in local, state and federal tax revenues.” Aquila Resources provides additional information about the mine project on its website, including the steps it has taken to be in compliance, e.g., a comprehensive environmental baseline study to meet Michigans’ Part 632 Permit to Mine requirements. See also Meidatrackers ““Back Forty” Mine Holds up To Gedicks’ and Gauger’s Criticism” dated Sept. 19, 2017.

Andersen Library resources may be able to help you learn more, e.g., such as “The danger of “sulfide mining” in the Lake Superior region” (Proceedings and Abstracts – Institute on Lake Superior Geology. Meeting, 2014, 60, 115-116), “Rescaled-range (R/S) analysis of time series of heavy metal pollution in iron sulfide mining area” (Environmental Science and Information Application Technology, 2009, 2, 249-252) and “Geochemical and mineralogical aspects of sulfide mine tailings” (Applied Geochemistry, 2015, vol.57, pp.157-177).

If you’d like assistance with finding additional information, please ask a librarian (choose chat or email, phone 262-472-1032, or visit the Reference Desk).

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Friday Fun: Culture Trip

I’m a fan of ‘armchair travel.’ You know, sit in a comfortable chair and read a book about another country and its delights, like In a sunburned country, a book about Australia by Bill Bryson. These days travel web sites are an alternative, often a more visually appealing alternative. Here’s a travel web site that made Dailytekk’s “100 Best, Most Interesting Websites 2017:”Culture Trip. Last December Forbes included this site on its list of “Five Fast-Growing British Businesses To Watch In 2017.”

CultureTrip search box

The web site says it aims “to tell the story of everywhere, with thousands of articles and videos published every month across our site, social media and apps.” The home page offers some enticing suggestions, like “A Guide to Brooklyn’s Weird and Wonderful Art Locales,” but you can search for a location (continent, country, city, etc.) that interests you as well. Then you are presented with many options in categories such as things to see and do, food and drink, places to stay, guides and tips, art, history, books, and more.

When I tried to challenge it by searching for Antarctica, I was offered eleven results in various categories. Once you select a category, in addition to reading that article you are offered additional things you might also like to explore. You could keep going for days, or weeks, or months! For example, I clicked on the “Art” offering (“First ‘Floating’ Biennale To Take Place In Antarctica“) and learned about the Antarctic Biennale that took place in March 2017. Apparently a 1959 treaty kept Antarctica free from being claimed by any state, and “the uninhabited land should be used entirely for creative purposes and scientific research, making it the ideal setting for artists of all nationalities to come together and showcase their work.” Two ships carrying artists made several stops at which debates, performances, and art installations were conducted. Intrigued (or skeptical), I searched for a an official Antarctic Biennale web site, where I found a link to images of this trip on Instagram and a quote by Nic Iljine, Advisor to the General Director of the State Hermitage Museum of art and culture in in Saint Petersburg, Russia:

The Antarctic Biennale is not just another art event. It is a utopian effort to get artists, architects, writers & philosophers to think about the last pure continent on this planet.

Back on the Culture Trip article on the Biennale, there were art options for other locations, including “The History of Flamenco Dance,” “The 10 Most Important Italian Artists You Should Know,” “The National Galley of Singapore in 5 Artworks,” and more. Or I could return to the Antarctic page and select other categories, e.g., “The Antarctic Book of Cooking and Cleaning” in the Books category, or “10 Weird Rules for Traveling in Antarctica” in Guides and Tips.

Enjoy.

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Book Sale

Book Cart
For November the book sale is featuring vintage and not-so-vintage nonfiction books on the topics of history, political science, religion, psychology, health, sports, sociology, and music. There are also several chemistry, physics, biology, and other science textbooks for those of you who want to refresh your scientific knowledge. As is typical, there are a smattering of other materials thrown in for the archaeologist in you. (Who knows what a little digging will find?!)

Books are $1 each for the majority of the month and the cost goes down to $.25 on the 25th of each month.

Next month we’ll be featuring fiction and games, as well as a few “gift worthy” books.

Stay warm and read a book!

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Rethinking Race and Technology: Digital and Diasporia Studies

Dr. Reginold Royston, faculty at UW-Madison’s iSchool and the Dept. of African Cultural Studies, will talk about “Rethinking Race and Technology: Digital and Diasporia Studies” on Thurs., Nov. 9, 2017, from 3:30-4:30pm in UC 259. It’s part of the African American Heritage Lecture Series.

You can learn more about Dr. Royston at his public website. His dissertation “Re-Assembling Ghana: Diaspora and innovation in the African mediascape” is available online via University of California-Berkeley. An abridged version of his chapter, ” At home, online: Affective exchange and the diasporic body in Ghanaian internet video” in the book Migrating the Black body: The African diaspora and visual culture is available from his website, and UWW students and faculty/staff may obtain the book from other UW campus libraries via the free UW Request service. Requested items arrive in 2-5 weekdays.

cover of book Digital DiasporaIf you would like to learn more, Andersen Library may be able to help! Among resources available are books such as Digital diaspora: A race for cyberspace (3rd-floor Main Collection, QA76.9.C66 E95 2009; preview some text at Google Books), the chapter “Redefining “Africa” in the diaspora with new media technologies: The making of AfricaResource.com” in the book The new African diaspora (online via Project MUSE; preview some text at Google Books), and Diasporas in the new media age: Identity, politics, and community (online via ProQuest EbookCentral); articles including “Performing patriotic citizenship: Zimbabwean diaspora and their online newspaper reading practices” (Journal of African Media Studies, 2014, vol.6:no.1, pp.91-109, doi:10.1386/jams.6.1.91_1), “Diaspora, digital media, and death counts: Eritreans and the politics of memorialisation” (African Studies, 2013, vol.72:no.2, pp.246-264, doi:10.1080/00020184.2013.812875), and “Rethinking migration in the digital age: Transglocalization and the Somali diaspora” (Global Networks, 2017, vol.17:no.1, pp.23-46, doi:10.1111/glob.12127).

If you’d like assistance with finding additional information, please ask a librarian (choose chat or email, phone 262-472-1032, or visit the Reference Desk).

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Daylight Saving Time Ends This Weekend!

clock imagePlease remember to set your clocks and watches back an hour this Sunday, November 5, at 2am (or whenever you get up on Sunday, or before you go to sleep Saturday night), in observance of the end of Daylight Saving Time (DST). Whee! An extra hour for sleep or study!

Do you find the time change disruptive? Last year Popular Mechanics provided an article explaining the benefits of Daylight Saving Time, and it cites a book, Seize the daylight: The curious and contentious story of Daylight Saving Time, which UWW students and staff may get from other UW libraries by using the free UW Request service. Requested items arrive in 2-5 weekdays. A preview of some of the text is available from Google Books.

You can learn more about the history of DST from the U.S. Naval Observatory’s “Daylight Time” web page and the article “Standard and Daylight-saving Time” (Scientific American, 1979, vol.240:no.5, pp.46-53). Many studies have been done about the effects of DST, such as “Does the transition into daylight saving time affect students’ performance?” (Economics of Education Review, 2017, doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.econedurev.2017.07.002).

If you’d like assistance with finding additional information, please ask a librarian (choose chat or email, phone 262-472-1032, or visit the Reference Desk).

Andersen Library is a federal depository library with federal government documents on a variety of current and relevant issues available to you in various formats (print, DVD/CD-ROM, online). Check out your government at Andersen Library!

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Veterans Week 2017

A number of events are planned on campus for Veterans Week, in honor of our veterans, military service members, and their family members.

The poster listing all events, including those especially for veterans and service members, is online, but here are some highlights of events that are open to all:

poster listing events for Veterans Week 2017 at UWW

Nov. 1-13: “Back in the world: A living legacy of Vietnam, WWII & Korea through the lens of Jim Gill” exhibit in Roberta’s Art Gallery, UC (Gallery hours: M-TH 10am-6pm, F 10am-3pm, and special hours on Sat. Nov 4: 11am-1pm) – This exhibit is based on the three-hour “Wisconsin war stories” documentary from Wisconsin Public Television (WPT). There will be a reception for the exhibit from 1-2pm on Fri., Nov. 10, at which the photographer and producer of the documentary will talk about their experiences documenting Wisconsin veterans’ stories.

Nov. 6-10 in the UC Commons: Tie a ribbon on a tree in honor of those who have served, or who are serving.

Thurs., Nov. 9, 11am-12:30pm: “Question, Persuade, & Refer” (suicide prevention) workshop in UC 259. No registration required; open to the entire campus community. “Compared to their non-Veteran peers, most Veterans are at an increased risk for suicide,” and “[i]ncreases in suicide rates are particularly evident among female Veterans and Veterans who do not use VHA services.” For more information about the importance of working to prevent suicides among our veterans, please see the U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs’ National Suicide Data Report and state data sheets online.

Fri., Nov. 10, 11am-12:30pm in the Hamilton Room, UC: Veterans Ceremony. Distinguished speaker will be Matt Bills (DAV Chapter #39), and the student speaker will be William Breyman.

See also the Veterans History Project (Library of Congress, American Folklife Center), which collects, preserves, and makes accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans. Additional first-hand accounts of service in particular wars and conflicts may be submitted, either recorded materials (audio or video) or print items (diaries, letters, photos, etc.) – see the guidelines.

If you’d like assistance with finding additional information, please ask a librarian (choose chat or email, phone 262-472-1032, or visit the Reference Desk).

Andersen Library is a federal depository library with federal government documents on a variety of current and relevant issues available to you in various formats (print, DVD/CD-ROM, online). Check out your government at Andersen Library!

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