Benefits of Yoga vs. Gym Workouts

Going to the gym has always been the “standard” place to get your workout in.  Besides recently new at home workout remedies along with programmed bikes/treadmills, working out and lifting weights at a workout facility was the place to be and the norm for “getting fit.” However, yoga workouts have skyrocketed in popularity within the last few years.  More and more athletes, celebrities and everyday people are appreciating the true benefits, mentally and physically, about yoga.  In today’s blog, I’ll be listing the differences and benefits between a yoga workout and a gym workout in hopes it will inspire you to try something new and learn some valuable information.

YOGA:

Benefits: Explanation:
1) Yoga benefits the mind, body, and soul Yoga not only helps you tone your muscles but also focuses on bringing awareness to your whole body and inject positive energy into yourself.  A gym workout really only focuses on improving your body’s physical condition.
2) Yoga will make you lean Yoga stretches and strengthens your muscles simultaneously which causes you to appear more lean.  When lifting weights, that causes your muscles to bulk up and look larger.
3) Yoga is more efficient Yoga relies on your whole entire body for strengthening. Gym workouts use weights and equipment (with only a few exceptions).  In yoga, you use your entire body weight as “weights.” Unlike at the gym, your muscles are isolated by being worked individually which can take more time to build.
4) Yoga is calming/reduces stress/improves concentration Yoga focuses on connecting your mind, body and spirit into one workout.  (And if you haven’t tried it, it’s harder than you think.)  You have to focus on performing everything with intention while following and paying attention to your breathing.  Feeling each movement and muscles of your body being worked.

GYM:

Benefits: Explanation:
1) Wide variety of workouts you can do While at the gym, you have a large selection of equipment and space to use to create your own workout.  With yoga, it normally follows a standard format.
2) Builds muscle/makes you bulk At the gym, you normally use weights or equipment to break down your muscles so they can build back up bigger and stronger. With yoga, the practice strengthens and stretches your body instead.
3) Can be too rigorous or harmful to your body Going to the gym and doing intense weight lifting or cardio can be harmful to your body.  Yoga helps all aspects of your body by engaging your muscles, brain, and breathing.
4) Going to the gym allows you to potentially burn calories and sweat more When working out at a high intensity, your body burns more calories and makes you sweat more.  The can help with weight loss, circulation, and purging toxins in your body.  Unlike yoga where you are purposely trying to lower your heart rate and calm your mind/body.

Some people may still not be a fan of taking a yoga class or consider it a real workout.  However, if you haven’t already, check out Warhawk Group Fitness Yoga classes hosted everyday in the dance studio at the Williams Center!  Obviously there is always more to learn about completing workouts in the gym or by doing yoga so if you’re interested, learn more about the topics here:

https://www.doyouyoga.com/15-reasons-yoga-is-better-than-the-gym/

https://www.naturalremedieshome.com/yoga-versus-gym

As always, stay fit, stay healthy, stay beautiful, Warhawks!

Talk soon,

Ashley

Fitness Groupie

It had been a long day, so heading into my final challenge at 7pm took a lot of motivation. I had never done Yoga before, and I was worried about the amount of people that would be there. If only one or two people showed up, the instructor might single me out, and correct my form. If there was a ton of people, would I even get a good workout, or get lost in the class? Continue reading

A Vegetarian’s Guide to Protein

Pic for Blog- Protein for VegetariansAs a vegetarian for only a year now you’d think that being asked about my diet choice has yet to get repetitive. However, I am now used to being asked about why and how I’m a vegetarian, (sometimes more than once by the same people). When I’m asked why I’m a vegetarian I simply explain how it’s a step in the right direction to make my diet full of natural, plant-based food from the earth (and perhaps avoiding meat hanging at market stands while on a trip to Cambodia was a contributing factor as well). Whatever your reason is for being a vegetarian, you’ve probably been pitched the question, that is: “but…how do you get protein?” I’ve gotten this numerous times (even got put on the spot by my biology professor during a lecture…not an ideal situation). So if you are a vegetarian, thinking about being a vegetarian, or simply want to understand the diet of a vegetarian, here is how we do it:

Quinoa: This is the first answer I spit out when given the ol’ protein question, (except of course when I was called on in the middle of lecture and was too put on the spot to give an sufficient answer.) For those of you who do not know, quinoa (pronounced Keen-wah) is a pseudo grain. The title “pseudo grain” is pretty misleading because technically it is a seed, so it’s also gluten free! This is an important staple to my diet because it’s one of the few plant proteins that have the 9 essential amino acids all by itself, without combining with complementary proteins. One cup of quinoa has 24 grams of protein!

  • Cook yourself a big batch in the beginning of the week and store the rest in a container to reheat throughout the week! Eat it with either veggies stirred in, avocado, eggs, or chick peas! You can also eat it like you would oatmeal, drizzle some honey on top, throw banana slices on top and sprinkle on some cinnamon!

Nuts and seeds: Almonds in particular offer the most protein compared to other tree nuts. As far as seeds go, chia seeds and pumpkin seeds offer a lot of protein as well! You can eat them alone as a snack or add them to your food! Aside from the fact that they are an easy source of protein, they are also good for our heart, support cognitive function and keeps our blood sugar in check.

Eggs: Eggs are still a part of most vegetarians’ diet. The exclusion of eggs falls under the category of Vegan rather than vegetarian. One egg has 6 grams of protein, so if you make yourself a 2 egg omelet with perhaps a side of veggies and quinoa, you’re off to a protein packed start of your day!

Soy beans: Another huge source of protein! One cup of soy beans contains 68 grams of protein, which is over the average person’s daily intake of protein. Soy beans also contain the 9 essential amino acids, so they are sufficient substitute to meat, which is why tofu is used instead of meat!

If you are a vegetarian yourself, I hope you learned something new about plant protein! If you are just curious about how vegetarians get by, I hope you learned that we don’t just live off of grilled cheese sandwiches. Even If you are a carnivore, add some of these proteins to your diet!  They are healthy and accessible!

“It’s a good day to have a good one!”

-Alena Purpero