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Final lap: Completing a BBA online while fulfilling a NASCAR dream

The College of Business and Economics offers its AACSB-accredited Bachelor of Business Administration degree 100 percent online. With rigorous curriculum, award-winning faculty specifically trained in online teaching, value-driven tuition, and engaging online platform, we can help you reach your goals with a program that fits your life. Learn how to complete your BBA degree online today.

 


Final lap: Completing a BBA online while living a NASCAR dream

Greg Ebert was just 12 credits away from earning his undergraduate degree at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater when he got the chance of a lifetime to pursue his love of NASCAR racing.

Greg has fond memories of UW-Whitewater, where he pursued a Bachelor of Administration in general management at the College of Business and Economics. He formed lifelong friendships living in the Knilans residence hall and later sharing an apartment with nine other young men. He also worked as a Resident Adviser, went to football games and was even on homecoming court.

But one of his longtime friends got a job with Roush Fenway Racing, and during his senior year, Greg had the chance to interview for a travel mechanic position with the company’s NASCAR truck team in Michigan.

When he got the call offering him the job, he was torn.

After a lengthy hiatus, NASCAR car chief Greg Ebert ‘11 finished his undergraduate degree through the UW-Whitewater online BBA program. (RCR/HHP photo)

After a lengthy hiatus, NASCAR car chief Greg Ebert ‘11 finished his undergraduate degree through the UW-Whitewater online BBA program. (RCR/HHP photo)

He explained, “I felt like I had to go for it, but it was an extremely difficult conversation with my parents. They had been paying half my tuition, and at first, they told me I couldn’t quit.”

Greg’s brother, Brian, intervened, however. Their father had owned a race car, and racing had been a family affair. Greg worked on Nathan Haseleu’s Late Model team and crisscrossed the state on the short track circuit as well. Brian cautioned his parents that they would be cheating the whole family out of a dream.

In the end, Greg’s parents gave him their reluctant blessing with one caveat: he had to promise to eventually finish his degree.

To ensure he could keep that promise, he worked with UW-Whitewater administration and advising to fully understand his status and what would happen with his credits. He finished out the semester, packed his belongings and moved to Michigan to start a new life.

The next eight-and-a-half years sped by. He lived in Michigan for two years, until the truck team moved to North Carolina. He followed them south to stay in truck racing for two more years, enjoying his first big national wins with the team. He switched to one of the Roush Fenway cup racing teams in 2005. By the end of that year, he was promoted to car chief, or lead mechanic, and stayed in that position until the end of 2009.

Greg and Roush Fenway Racing parted ways in 2009; however, Roush Fenway helped Greg get a job with Richard Petty Motorsports. He was with Richard Petty Motorsports through the end of 2016.

But at the end of 2009, in the gap between working for Roush Fenway Racing and Richard Petty Motorsports, Greg had gone home to spend Christmas in North Carolina with his wife, Chelsie, and 11-month-old son, Brady. Chelsie asked him what he was going to do when he was done with racing, and reminded him of his promise to finish his degree.

Taking Chelsie’s words to heart, Greg called the UW-Whitewater admissions office early in January 2010. They helped him enroll in the online BBA program before the spring semester began.

He eased in by taking one class at a time, but after a nearly nine-year hiatus, it was still an adjustment.

He admitted, “Finishing my degree with 50 to 70-hour work weeks, a brutal travel schedule, and a one-year-old at home was probably a bigger challenge than I’d expected. It took a lot of discipline and time management to make it work.”

Greg completed his credit requirements and graduated on May 18, 2011, to the delight of his wife and parents.

Greg has been working for the Richard Childress Racing team as a car chief since January 2017.

Though he has not worked in a traditional setting, he has applied his business education in his career. The team is run as a business, and Greg is responsible for managing people, time and other resources.

He explained, “I’m in charge of the other four or five guys that work on the car. It’s my responsibility to teach people and guide them while making sure projects get done in timely fashion.”

There is a lot on the line if the car is not ready to race.

“It’s a huge responsibility as a car chief,” he said. “Between equipment costs, travel costs, sponsorships and prize money, there might be a half-million to a million dollars at stake for one team on one race weekend.”

Reflecting on the last 16 years, Greg has no regrets that he pursued his dream when he had the chance, but he is also glad that the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater offers an excellent online undergraduate program so that he could finish his degree and keep his promise to his parents.

“It’s never too late,” he urged. “The UW-Whitewater online program is easy to navigate and it’s user-friendly. The professors are really great when you have questions. They’re prompt and responsive to emails. If you can’t get back to campus, you can still finish your degree.”

Learn how to reach your goals through the online BBA program from the College of Business and Economics.

Despite 50 to 70-hour work weeks, 38 weekends of travel a year, and a one-year-old son at home, Ebert completed his degree in less than 18 months. Greg, right, is pictured with Matt Hien 'xx, left, friend Clint Anderson, and Ryan Helser 'xx in Kansas City, Kansas on May 9, 2015.

Despite 50 to 70-hour work weeks, 38 weekends of travel a year, and a one-year-old son at home, Ebert completed his degree in less than 18 months. Greg, right, is pictured with fellow UW-Whitewater alumnus Matt Hein ’01, left, friend Clint Anderson, and UW-Whitewater alumnus Ryan Helser ’02 in Kansas City, Kansas on May 9, 2015.

Ebert shares, “It’s not desk job or an office job, but I’ve used a lot of what I learned in my classes at UW-Whitewater. Being a car chief requires a lot of management.” Ebert, left is pictured talking with Robert Stramiska as they fine-tune a Talladega car in Alabama. (RCR/HHP photo)

Ebert shares, “It’s not desk job or an office job, but I’ve used a lot of what I learned in my classes at UW-Whitewater. Being a car chief requires a lot of management.” Ebert, left is pictured talking with Robert Stramiska as they fine-tune a Talladega car in Alabama. (RCR/HHP photo)

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CyberGirlz Assemble at UW-Whitewater

Christina Outlay, associate professor of information technology and supply chain management, has a mission, but it is not secret. She is helping develop a new generation of tech superheroes through the CyberGirlz camp program. With a disproportionately small number of women in IT and computing careers, Outlay is doing what she can to spark girls’ interest in these STEM fields.

The 2017 CyberGirlz camp was held July 18th and 19th at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. Sixth, seventh, and eighth-grade girls flooded the campus with their excitement and laughter. They had the opportunity to experience classrooms and labs in Hyland Hall, get a taste of hardware, engineering and programming projects, and learn about tech careers.

Outlay’s energy is focused on building students up and encouraging them not to let obstacles become roadblocks.

Seventh-grade students, enjoying the "Parent Dectector" activity in a Hyland Hall computer lab. (©UW-Whitewater/Craig Schreiner)

Seventh-grade students enjoy building a “Parent Detector” video system. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

As the seventh-graders kicked off the “Parent Detector” project using hand-held Raspberry Pi computers, infrared motion sensors, and Python programming, she reminded them, “If something goes wrong, we fix it. If we can’t fix it, we work around it. We don’t panic.”

Similar to previous years, each grade group had a slightly different agenda. They witnessed technology at work at the UWW TV/radio station, the CoBE media studio, and UW-Whitewater campus police station. They even went on a campus tour, visited a residence hall, and ate at Esker dining hall.

Learning modules included mobile app development, building and programming robots, Internet safety and security, computer hardware and software, Scratch and Python programming, introductions to HTML and CSS, and for the eighth-graders, a focus on entrepreneurship. The eighth-grade girls were asked to think of a business idea, and by the end of the two-day program, they created and presented a website for it.

A new addition to the camp program, meeperBOTS, was a runaway favorite with the girls. Meeper Technology, located in Whitewater, Wisconsin, develops fun, engaging toys that encourage STEM activities like robotics and coding.

Ancha Barry reacts to a meeperBOT vehicle she and her sister are operating at Cybergirlz technology camp. (©UW-Whitewater/Craig Schreiner)

Ancha Barry reacts to a meeperBOT vehicle she and her sister are operating at CyberGirlz technology camp. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

CEO Liz Eversoll introduced Meeper Technology and the project to the girls, while Meghan Konopacki and Brayden Mitchell helped them pair and control the meeperBOTS. Eversoll explained the breadth of expertise required to make a tech product like meeperBOTS, and connected this to the wide range of STEM careers.

She related, “I was the only female in many of my college computer science classes. It’s wonderful to see dozens of girls excited about robotics, coding, and building. It’s important we foster and grow this interest in STEM so that these young girls can design, code and build our next generation of products providing an important perspective and input that is lacking today. Girls with STEM skills will also realize the economic benefits of tech careers and help fill our national tech skills gap.”

Describing the girls’ reception of the activity, Outlay said, “At the start of the second day of camp, we always ask the girls to review the activities from the previous day. When asked what their favorite activity was, the girls enthusiastically shouted out, ‘meeperBOTS!’”

When asked about her future plans for the CyberGirlz program, Outlay shared, “CyberGirlz is supported largely through sponsorship and donations. One of our goals is to make sure that the camp is financially sustainable for many years to come, especially as we add upgraded technologies and greater staffing needs each year, but still low-cost and accessible to as many girls as possible. I’m also focused on increasing the diversity of girls who attend the camp. Women are in short supply in the IT field; women of color are even more rare. Finally, my biggest goal is to get and keep the girls excited about IT and coming back each year — hopefully, enough for them to foster that love of computing through high school and college, and ultimately, into an IT career.”

The CyberGirlz program began at UW-Whitewater in 2008, and Outlay has run the program since Fall 2015. Outlay’s passion projects also include colorcoded, which strives to increase the number of minority and low-income youth participating in computing. As recently as 2014, women represented only 26 percent of the computing workforce; minority women represent less than four percent.

©UW-Whitewater/Craig Schreiner

UW-Whitewater senior Sonia Kalmogo, in purple shirt, high fives girls in her group at a CyberGirlz camp on Tuesday, July 18, 2017 in Hyland Hall after they assembled components of a computer on the desktop in the middle. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

©UW-Whitewater/Craig Schreiner

Campers in CyberGirlz technology camp use toy bricks to build robotic vehicles on platforms provided by Meeper Technologies of Whitewater. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

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DBA Student Spotlight: Henry Balani

The DBA Student Spotlight series highlights individual stories from within our Doctorate of Business Administration cohorts, representing diverse backgrounds, experiences and aspirations.

(UW-Whitewater photo/Jonathon Kelley)

(UW-Whitewater photo/Jonathon Kelley)

 

Henry Balani

Global Head of Strategic Affairs | Accuity, Division of Reed Business Information, Reed Elsevier

September 2017 (anticipated)


Men, angels and government regulation

The title of Henry Balani’s dissertation topic, “If Men Were Angels, No Government Would Be Necessary: Two essays on the effects of regulations on banking sector valuation,” loosely quotes James Madison in the Federalist Papers. Henry felt it was appropriate for his dissertation topic, as it relates to the challenges civil society faces in terms of the need for regulation.

With 25 years of practitioner experience in the field of economics and 15 years in the financial sector, Henry has an intense interest in money laundering and banking regulations. More specifically, he is concerned with understanding, identifying and preventing money laundering, as well as balancing regulatory insight with optimal banking effectiveness.

Henry had found that there was a lack of academic research related to the practical impact of regulation on the banking sector; the industry largely relied on anecdotal data. By augmenting his deep experience as a practitioner with the ability to perform rigorous academic research, he felt he could help bridge this gap, and contribute to both his field of practice and his company.

He explained, “My goal is to really look at my domain space with regard to money laundering and its impact on banking. My intent is to provide a more structured and deliberate framework for presenting my data. That was a big part of the impetus for doing a doctorate program.”

Henry focused on Doctorate of Business Administration programs, feeling the practitioner-focused terminal degree would give him the knowledge and tools he needed. After investigating programs throughout the nation, as well as some in the United Kingdom, he eventually chose the DBA program from UW-Whitewater College of Business and Economics.

Several factors contributed to this decision. A top criterion was being able to complete the program within three years. AACSB accreditation, an internationally-recognized standard of quality, was also a major criterion. An additional consideration was location. UW-Whitewater is a just a two-and-a-half-hour drive from his home near Chicago; whereas, he had also considered programs in California and Edinburgh, Scotland.

Henry Balani enjoys a moment of levity during a weekend class. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

Henry Balani enjoys a moment of levity during a weekend class. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

To maximize available study time during the monthly on-campus weekend sessions, Henry stayed in one of the UW-Whitewater dormitories. It had been almost 25 years since he had stayed on a college campus.

“I really enjoyed those weekends,” he said. “I think spending that extra time with my colleagues outside of the classroom helped build our camaraderie. It was really fun going back to school and staying in the dorms.”

There was a lot of hard work to be done, though. Henry found the curriculum itself was more challenging than previous studies he had undertaken.

“It’s significantly different from an MBA program,” he shared. He laughed and added, “’Significantly different’ is a loaded term, because you have to consider how you can statistically determine whether something is significant or not. It’s an example of how we end up thinking as doctoral candidates. It helps us be a lot more rigorous in terms of our approach to analysis, looking at concepts and challenging them.”

Reflecting on his experience, Henry expressed that it was positive overall. He stressed the impact on his thinking and how he looks at things.

He explained, “Coming from the practitioner world, I can understand some of the frustration towards the academic side. In the private sector, we’re always asking how something applies to the real world and what the financial benefit is. Now, having gone through a doctorate program, I understand the training and how it shapes the academic view. There’s definitely a balance to be struck.”

Planning to remain in practice, Henry hopes to help build connections between industry and academia by diving into practitioner-oriented research and publishing in business-focused journals. He intends to link rigorous academic research with real-world applications and financially relevant outcomes for the betterment of the banking industry.

This will not be an easy endeavor, given the complex relationship between government and banking, but Henry feels equipped for the challenges ahead.

He stated, “I have already had the opportunity to publish a paper on trade based money laundering in an academic journal. I continue to speak on the impact of regulation on banking, and recently was invited to speak at the United Nations in New York to policy makers and diplomats. The skills I have learned in the Doctorate of Business Administration program have been very valuable, and I look forward to researching publishing in this important area.”

UW-Whitewater’s AACSB-accredited Doctorate of Business Administration program is a professional doctorate that enables students to develop in-depth expertise in a specific business area. The DBA is a 60-credit program offered using a cohort model where students attend classes one weekend each month for two years, followed by a year of dissertation work.  Learn more

Henry Balani was pleased to find a DBA program meeting his criteria within a two-and-a-half-hour drive of his home near Chicago.  (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

Henry was pleased to find a DBA program meeting his criteria within a two-and-a-half-hour drive of his Chicago-area home. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

 

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Academic history: First DBA students successfully defend dissertations

Earning a doctorate is frequently described as a journey—one that has at its end a final pinnacle, the dissertation, to be scaled. The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater College of Business and Economics is proud to share that two of its doctoral candidates have conquered their dissertations and reached the end of their Doctorate of Business Administration journeys.

On May 23, 2017, Stephen Gray successfully defended his doctoral dissertation, “Credit Decisions and the Effects of Earnings Quality,” and Brian Huels defended his dissertation, “Antecedents to Taxpayer Compliance: Essays exploring the influence of personality and culture,” on June 13. They each satisfied the requirements of their respective committees and earned their doctorate titles.

Their personal achievements also signify a major milestone for the university. Just over five years ago, in May 2012, Professor of Management Praveen Parboteeah made a serious proposal to begin a DBA program at the UW-Whitewater College of Business and Economics. Leadership at the college and university were very supportive, helping to propel the final proposal forward and navigate the University of Wisconsin System process. Meanwhile, a DBA committee—including Associate Dean Paul Ambrose, Associate Professor Pavan Chennamaneni, Assistant Professor Balaji Sankaranarayanan, Assistant Dean Robert Schramm, and Professor Linda Yu-—and many other dedicated faculty members, developed a strong, doctorate-level curriculum. The program proposal was approved by the Board of Regents in the summer of 2013 and the premiere cohort kicked off in September 2014.

As Dean John Chenoweth expressed before Steve Gray’s presentation, “This accomplishment showcases the ability of the college and university to be innovative, to move rapidly when needed, and most importantly, to do that while delivering quality.”

The DBA was designed to be a practitioner-oriented terminal degree with a strong focus on how to strategically solve real-world problems. UW-Whitewater developed a curriculum that integrates business knowledge across functional breadth areas such as management, accounting, finance, marketing and information technology.

The 60-credit program is intended to be completed in three years. Students attend classes one weekend each month for two years, followed by one year of dissertation work. This schedule helps accommodate professionals who cannot press pause on their careers.

Looking back on the program’s challenges and triumphs, DBA Program Director K. Praveen Parboteeah shared, “We faced skeptics who did not believe we had the ability to deliver a quality program. But with the help of university leadership, the DBA committee, and the 30 or so faculty who have taught courses, mentored students, and guided students as members of their dissertation committees, we have collectively ‘done it!’”

Dean Chenoweth put the milestone in a broader context, saying, “Our doctoral students are all engaged in professional communities, either in their respective industries or academia. We’ve taken a cohort through a process designed to train them and advance their research skills. Throughout that process—not just at the end—they’ve gained knowledge and skills to help advance the regional economy. And as they complete the program, it allows our university, as well as the communities they rejoin, to move forward.”

Everyone associated with UW-Whitewater wholeheartedly congratulates Dr. Stephen Gray, DBA and Dr. Brian Huels, DBA on completing their doctoral journeys, and looks forward to additional cohort members attaining their degrees over the summer.

Steve shared his feelings about completing the program, saying, “There is a great sense of satisfaction in accomplishing something like this, and I’m grateful for the opportunity to push myself to new levels. It’s prepared me to look forward to what’s next with confidence. Having completed an MBA and now a DBA, I know that I can take what I’ve learned and do something even greater.”

He added, “Before starting the DBA program, I made the choice to invest in myself. I have no regrets about that decision. Other investments can lose value, but no one can take this away from me.”

Brian offered his reflections, saying, “When I started the program, I was looking at it like a ‘start and stop’ endeavor. But what I found is that the DBA isn’t a ‘start and stop’ program. It really just laid the foundation for me to see that there’s so much more out there I can do. The reality is that you’re always learning. The degree is done, but there’s always more.”

In terms of what was next, he added, “I’d thought that I’d complete the program, get the degree, and someday down the road it might open doors for me. But it’s been exciting to see how quickly those doors opened up.”

The program has now successfully concluded recruitment of its fourth cohort, which will start in Fall 2017. Applications for the Fall 2018 DBA cohort will be accepted starting September 1, 2017, and rolling admissions decisions will be made starting November 1, 2017. The final application deadline is January 30, 2018. Learn more

Doctor of Business Administration program director Praveen Parboteeah, right, gives a "thumbs up" to Stephen Gray immediately following Gray's dissertation defense. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

Doctor of Business Administration program director Praveen Parboteeah, right, gives a “thumbs up” to Stephen Gray immediately following Gray’s dissertation defense. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

Brian Huels, left, walks across campus with fellow cohort member Stephen Gray and Stephen's wife, Geralyn. Stephen and Brian were the very first doctoral candidates to complete the DBA program. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

Brian Huels, left, walks across campus with fellow cohort member Stephen Gray and Stephen’s wife, Geralyn. Stephen and Brian were the very first doctoral candidates to complete the DBA program. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

Members from Cohort 1 gather outside Timothy J. Hyland Hall after class. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

Members of the Fall 2014 Cohort gather outside Timothy J. Hyland Hall. The DBA program’s cohort model provides an important source of support for students. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

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DBA Student Spotlight: Aaron Kinney

The DBA Student Spotlight series highlights individual stories from within our Doctorate of Business Administration cohorts, representing diverse backgrounds, experiences and aspirations.

DBA Student Aaron Kinney

(UW-Whitewater photo/Jonathon Kelley)

 

Aaron Kinney

Executive Director – Cardiac Service Line | Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin

September 2017 (anticipated)


Advancing business knowledge and academic research

A comparatively young degree, the Doctorate of Business Administration is a practitioner-orientated program with a curriculum that integrates business knowledge across functional areas such as management, accounting, finance, marketing and information technology. Unlike the traditional Ph.D., which tends to be more theoretical, the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater DBA focuses on how to strategically solve real-world problems.

This approach was attractive to Aaron Kinney, a doctoral candidate in the UW-Whitewater DBA program and Executive Director of the Herma Heart Center at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. Prior to working for Children’s Hospital, he worked for the Medical College of Wisconsin. Both institutions fall within a niche where patient care, academia and business intersect.

Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems surveys, which measure patient perspectives on care, are an area of concern for hospitals. Based on these scores, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services can withhold up to two percent of hospitals’ Medicare reimbursement payments—potentially millions of dollars for large institutions. Furthermore, healthcare consumers may search and compare HCAHPS scores through an online database.

Because the surveys measure patient perception, many variables may drive their responses. As a result, there is some uncertainty how accurately the surveys reflect quality of care, as opposed to patient satisfaction, and the relationship of the two. Aaron also felt there were opportunities to improve how hospitals analyzed and responded to the survey data.

He related, “I realized it was pretty muddy on the academic side in terms of how patient satisfaction is measured and used. Most hospitals have completed HCAHPS surveys, but academic studies often isolate one survey question as being definitive of patient satisfaction.”

In addition, he was interested in a variable neither directly related to care nor captured on these surveys.

He explained, “I think technology plays an increasingly important role, and that at times, the patient’s perception of the healthcare experience has nothing to do with the care they receive. I wanted to see if there was a clear connection between patient satisfaction and the use of technology like electronic patient portals.”

These interests and concerns fed into Aaron’s DBA coursework and development of his dissertation topic, “Towards a Theory of Patient Satisfaction: Studies on the Impacts of Patient-Technology Fit and Electronic Patient Portal Use on Patient Satisfaction Outcome.”

Kinney engages in a group discussion. Describing the cohort model, he relates, "It would be really challenging to go through the program without your fellow cohort members. They offer such broad experience. You're able to lean on each other and work through things. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

Kinney engages in group discussion during a weekend class. Describing the cohort model, he relates, “It would be really challenging to go through the program without your fellow cohort members. They offer such broad experience, and you’re able to lean on each other and work through things. It’s very helpful. (UW-Whitewater photo/Craig Schreiner)

Though he is not yet done with the program, Aaron has already reaped benefits from his studies. For example, it has impacted his ability to solve real-world business problems and participate with faculty and staff that are publishing in academic journals. As a co-author, he has had numerous abstracts accepted for presentation and even has a manuscript recommended for publication in the journal Pediatric Cardiology.

“Because I’ve gained an understanding of theory, research, and statistics, I’ve been able to contribute to papers and presentations as a co-author,” he shared. “I’m definitely putting what I’ve learned into practice.”

Reflecting on his experience with UW-Whitewater, Aaron said that he would do it all over again.

“Overall, it’s been great,” he said. “It’s been very challenging, but rewarding. If I had to do all over again, I might look at Ph.D. programs a little more closely, but think I would land on the same solution. The DBA is perfect for what I want to do, and UW-Whitewater’s format and schedule fit my needs.”

He also expressed appreciation for the UW-Whitewater’s veterans’ services, saying, “A lot of schools say they have people to handle it, but in my experience, UW-Whitewater really delivers. The staff was amazingly good at taking care of my GI Bill benefits. They’ve made it easy for me, which has been a pleasure.”

UW-Whitewater’s AACSB-accredited Doctorate of Business Administration program is a professional doctorate that enables students to develop in-depth expertise in a specific business area. The DBA is a 60-credit program offered using a cohort model where students attend classes one weekend each month for two years, followed by a year of dissertation work.  Learn more

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