Actual Cranberry Mustard (forget about that other one)

Cranberry mustard take two. I was excited about how I wanted the last one to taste and it was a letdown. I’m not afraid to say it. The last attempt just didn’t have the cranberry taste I was looking for. I knew that I needed to take the time to make my own cranberry jam and now that Thanksgiving is over, that’s exactly what I’ve done.  It turns out that making your own cranberry jam is extremely easy. I will say that I didn’t do the actual process of canning or anything extreme since I don’t plan on keeping it for very long. So forget about the other cranberry mustard and focus on this one. I’m sure it will be a delight.

Here’s what you’ll need:

mustard powder, mustard seeds, liquids, cranberry jam, honey Photo by K. Stenz

mustard powder, mustard seeds, liquids, cranberry jam, honey
Photo by K. Stenz

Yield: about 1/2 cup

Dry Stuff

  • 1              tbsp brown mustard seeds
  • 2              tbsp yellow mustard seeds
  • 2              tbsp dried yellow mustard

Liquids

  • 1              tbsp honey
  • 2              tbsp cranberry jam
  • 1/4         cup water
  • 1/4         cup apple cider vinegar

Method

Grind the mustard seeds to a fine consistency. Whisk together all ingredients. In thirty second increments and stirring between, microwave the mixture for ninety seconds. Stir again to evenly distribute heat. Pour the mixture into a container and store in the refrigerator.

Ingredients mixed Photo by K. Stenz

Ingredients mixed
Photo by K. Stenz

Tasty homemade cranberry jam Photo by K. Stenz

Tasty homemade cranberry jam
Photo by K. Stenz

Results and Reflection

This was exactly what I was trying to do last time. I was initially planning on moving on and making something completely different, but sometimes you just have to know that you can do something right before you leave it behind. This mustard is sweet, somewhat tart from the cranberries, and just slightly spicy from the mustard. Excellent on a pretzel or a turkey sandwich if you, hopefully, still have some left over thanksgiving food or are still making turkey.

Finished Photo by K. Stenz

Finished
Photo by K. Stenz

Special Announcement

This will be my last update. This has been a fun mustard experiment, but the time has come for me to move on. I’m starting to feel uncomfortable about how frequently I talk about mustard when I’m around people I don’t see very often. I intentionally try not to bring it up but then I suddenly find myself just rambling about what makes different mustards hot. As much as I like mustard, I don’t feel like I want to be “the mustard guy.”

I hope you’ve had as much reading about mustard as I’ve had making it. Any maybe you learned that if not all the time, you can at least put away the Frenches for special occasions. Making mustard is pretty dang easy.

 

Cranberry Mustard

Cranberry mustard! Every week, when I try out a new mustard, I’m just inventing it as I go along. I almost never write the ingredients list until after the mustard is done and I know what I actually used. Sometimes I feel pretty safe following this route and sometimes I truly don’t know what to expect. Cranberry mustard definitely falls in the category of uncertainty. I really wasn’t even sure if I wanted this to be sweet or somewhat spicy until I was almost done making it (it’s sweet). I think I was having a hard time imaging how cranberry mustard should taste. I kept picturing something very sweet but then I would remember that it’s still going to be mustard. And these were not my only obstacles going in to this.

I had planned on making this somewhat similar to the raspberry mustard from before so I was going to use cranberry preserves. It turns out that cranberry preserves do not exist. The store offered all the pepper jelly or fig preserves I could ever want, but evidently nobody has ever requested cranberry preserves before. So, finding myself in a jam (J), I turned to the only jellied cranberries I could find, canned jellied cranberry sauce.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Yield: About 1 Cup

Dry(ish) Stuff:

  • 1/4         cup yellow mustard seed
  • 1/4         cup ground yellow mustard
  • 2              tblsp honey
  • 1/4         cup canned cranberry sauce

Liquids:

  • 1/4         cup lukewarm water
  • 1/4         cup apple cider vinegar
    ground mustard, mustard seed, honey, cranberry sauce photo by K. Stenz

    ground mustard, mustard seed, honey, cranberry sauce
    photo by K. Stenz

     

 

Method

In a medium dish, whisk all ingredients together until well mixed (the cranberry may not seem mixed perfectly but we are going to blend it so that’s okay). Heat mixture in the microwave for 30 seconds. Blend mixture until your desired consistency (I wanted it to look like it came out of a squeeze bottle). Heat in microwave for 1 more minute. Stir to evenly distribute heat. Pour into a small container and store in the refrigerator.

Mixed ingredients  photo by K. Stenz

Mixed ingredients
photo by K. Stenz

Results and Reflection

The problem with using jellied cranberry sauce is that the “sauce” tastes more like cold corn syrup than cranberries. This resulted in a nicely sweet, slightly cranberry tasting mustard. If I make this again, which I probably will, I’m going to make and use my own fresh cranberry jam. I was disappointed that this mustard wasn’t as rich in cranberry as I wanted it to be. That said, I think this will still be quite tasty on a leftover turkey sandwich. It’s fairly sweet with a hint of cranberry and just slightest bite from the mustard. I don’t know if it’s worth being thankful for, but some mustards take a second attempt.

finished cranberry mustard (a curious shade of pink) Photo by K. Stenz

Finished cranberry mustard (a curious shade of pink)
Photo by K. Stenz

NEXT WEEK: SPECIAL SURPISE MUSTARD

 

Horseradish Mustard

Horse Mustard! No wait, horseradish mustard! I especially like horseradish because it always makes me think about a horse on a skateboard and wearing cool sunglasses. When I was somewhat younger, I was a vegetarian for a year until I had a fateful encounter with some horseradish mustard. I was up later than responsible people should be and I admit that I had consumed my share of thirst quenching beverages. In my sleepy state, a friend and I staggered into a beautiful bar called Rays which served beautiful warm roast beef sandwiches. I nearly resisted until the bartender told me the sandwiches were served with house-made horseradish mustard. There is something about roast beef and horseradish mustard that makes you set aside your beliefs and values. I think it’s the mustard.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Yield: about 1/2 cup

Dry Stuff:

Ingredients -photo by K. Stenz

Mustard seed, prepared horseradish, honey, mustard powder, liquids
-photo by K. Stenz

  • 2     tablespoons yellow mustard seed
  • 3     tablespoons ground mustard
  • 2     tablespoons prepared horseradish
  • 1     teaspoon honey
  • 1/4  teaspoon kosher salt

Liquids:

  • 1/4   cup warm water
  • 1/4   cup apple cider vinegar

Method:

Put everything together in one bowl (this is to introduce the ingredients to one another). Whisk thoroughly (they are going to be spending quite a lot of time together so make sure everyone meets everyone else). Place the mixture into a blender and blend until it’s as smooth as something that is very smooth (for example, a very smooth mustard). Pour into a small dish and store in the refrigerator.

Mixed ingredients -photo by K. Stenz

Mixed ingredients
-photo by K. Stenz

Results and Reflection:

I did it! I intentionally made this mustard very mellow so that the addition of horseradish wouldn’t make it insane. It turned out to be just the right amount of heat. The horseradish gives a somewhat different spiciness than the mustard alone. This also came out a bit thinner than I was anticipating. Though I was annoyed initially, I actually think this is now the perfect consistency to spread on a sandwich. It’s akin to a horseradish sauce you might find in a bottle though perhaps not as creamy as those. I’m not sure that it’s as good as the horseradish mustard I had at that one late night at Ray’s, but it’s pretty darn good.

finished!  -photo by K. Stenz

finished!
-photo by K. Stenz

Jalapeño Mustard

Two different kinds of spicy! Mouth spicy and sinus spicy! Well, this shouldn’t be very mustard spicy so it might only be one kind of spicy but still, it’s very exciting. I should say up front here that I don’t think I’ve actually ever tasted jalapeño mustard before and I really don’t know what to expect. I spent much of today trying to think of a way to go about making this and I kept asking myself questions like “should it be really yellow” and “should I put cheese in it?” For some reason the cheese question kept popping into my mind and I kept having to remind myself how messed up a cheese mustard would be. Cheese mustard. And whenever I would picture the cheese mustard, I don’t know why, but it would always be this sort of half melted shredded cheddar on top like you put on chili or something. So just go ahead and imagine that for a moment so you know how I felt today.

So anyway, it feels somewhat ludicrous to say this, but there is no cheese in this mustard recipe. If you are somehow here looking for a cheese mustard then I just don’t even know what to say to you. Maybe check back for a later post or something. This mustard just has tasty tasty jalapeños.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Photo by Katie Stenz

Water and vinegar, mustard powder, mustard seeds, jalapeno, brown sugar, mix of remaining ingredients

Yield: about ½ cup

Dry stuff:

  • 1/8    cup yellow mustard seeds
  • 1/8    cup dried mustard powder
  • 1        tsp light brown sugar
  • 1/2     tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4     tsp turmeric
  • 1/8     tsp paprika
  • 1/8     tsp garlic powder
  • 1        medium sized jalapeño,   minced

Liquids:

  • 1/4     cup water
  • 1/4     cup apple cider vinegar

Method

Grind the mustard seeds to a fine powder. In a small, microwave-safe bowl, whisk together all of the dry ingredients. Whisk in the water and vinegar until well combined. Place the bowl in the microwave and heat for one minute. Remove the bowl from the microwave and puree the mixture with a blender, immersion blender, or food processor for one minute (an immersion blender would be best but I used a food processor with fairly good results). Pour mixture into storage container. Cover and store in the refrigerator.

photo by Katie Stenz

Ingredients, mixed but not yet heated

Results and Reflection

Wow, I’m super glad I didn’t put any cheese in this. Also, I have to say that much to my surprise, this may be one of my new favorite mustards. The mustard spiciness was very mild so most of the spiciness comes from the jalapeños. When I was making this, I thought I was probably using way too much jalapeño, but it actually isn’t that spicy. The pepper also adds a really nice freshness that I probably should have but did not anticipate. I decided to puree this into a very smooth mixture because I thought the texture of big jalapeño chunks would be off-putting, but I have also seen it done that way, if you prefer. So far I’ve only tasted this with some pretzels, but I’m imagining that it would also be very good on a hot dog or some other type of sausage with more easily recognized meat ingredients. Dip fries in it, even. I don’t know. I’m only supplying you with the tools you need to face a world of things that can potentially be dipped in mustard. I’m not doing the dipping for you.

Photo by Katie Stenz

Finished!

 

NEXT WEEK: HORSERADISH MUSTARD

 

Raspberry Mustard

Raspberry preserves and mustard. I know it sounds weird and frankly it might actually be weird. I have hope, though.  I was inspired by this recipe for a dip that I’ve made a few times before and always enjoyed. The dip recipe is essentially just spicy brown mustard mixed with honey and raspberry preserves so I wanted to see what would happen if I combined everything at the outset. This recipe borrows from my spicy brown mustard recipe but I’ve added the preserves and some honey and then simmered everything in a pot in order to bring down the spiciness and emphasize the sweet fruit preserves.

I’m using raspberry because raspberries are awesome, obviously, but I’m sure you could swap in any other kind of interesting fruit preserves instead. In fact, I strongly considered going with cherry or cranberry preserves to be more seasonal, but in the end I went with what I’ve had before.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Water and vinegar, mixture of seeds, ground mustard, honey, preserves, brown sugar Photo by Katie Stenz

Water and vinegar, mixture of seeds, ground mustard, honey, preserves, brown sugar
Photo by Katie Stenz

Yield: about 1/2 cup

Dry Stuff

  • 1        tbsp brown mustard seeds
  • 2        tbsp yellow mustard seeds
  • 2        tbsp dried yellow mustard powder
  • 1        tsp light brown sugar
  • 1/2     tsp kosher salt

Liquids

  • 1/4     cup tbsp water
  • 1/4     cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2        tbsp Raspberry preserves (I’m using Bonne Maman preserves.)
  • 1        tbsp Honey

Method

Mixed but not yet heated Photo by Katie Stenz

Mixed but not yet heated
Photo by Katie Stenz

Delicious looking raspberry preserves Photo by Katie Stenz

Delicious looking raspberry preserves
Photo by Katie Stenz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grind the mustard seeds to a somewhat course consistency. In a small bowl, whisk together all of the dry ingredients. Whisk in the water, vinegar, preserves, and honey. Pour the mixture into a small saucepan. Simmer until mustard is at your desired consistency (it will thicken up a bit more once it cools). Pour the mixture into a storage container and store in the refrigerator.

Results and Reflection

This turned out to be a delicious, sweet mustard which is perfect for pretzel dipping. I was somewhat concerned at first because it looks quite different than the dip that I’ve made, but it turned out to be very tasty. It’s nice and sweet and the taste of the raspberries comes through first and is followed by a subtle bitterness and spiciness from the mustard which complements it well. It is fairly sweet, though, so I wouldn’t recommend making it any sweeter than this.

I’m quite pleased with how this turned out and I’m excited to try a bunch more combinations of fruit preserves and mustard. Just imagine a nice cranberry mustard on a leftover turkey sandwich in a few weeks.

 

Finished product Photo by Katie Stenz

Finished product
             Photo by Katie Stenz

NEXT WEEK: JALAPEÑO MUSTARD

Brown Ale Brown Mustard

Beer Mustard! Beer and mustard, how should two such lovelies come together? There were so many different ways I wanted to go about this. I considered using a rich chocolate stout in some sort of sweet mustard or an IPA in a more adventurous yellow mustard, but in the end, I went with a fairly neutral brown ale in a fairly mild brown mustard. Maybe I’m craven. Maybe I just wanted to take small steps down the road of beer mustard and perhaps there will be more exciting flavors in a later post.

So far, I’ve tried a few different vinegars and a few different combinations of mustard seeds and heating methods but this was the first time I swapped something out for the water. Part of the fun in making mustard is that there are so many variables and possibilities. Even with this recipe for beer mustard, I could have skipped heating it up or used a cider vinegar or added some more sugar or any number of countless other choices I had. In this single variety of mustard, I already have more options than are available to me at the typical grocery store.

Here’s what you’ll need

Yield: about ½ cup

Mustard17

Dry stuff:

  • 1/8    cup mustard seeds                        (half brown and half yellow)
  • 1/8    cup dried mustard powder
  • 1        tsp light brown sugar
  • 1/2     tsp kosher salt

Liquids:

Method

Mixture after heating Photo by Katie Stenz

Mixture after heating
Photo by Katie Stenz

Mixed but not yet heated Photo by Katie Stenz

Mixed but not yet heated
Photo by Katie Stenz

Grind the mustard seeds to a somewhat course consistency. In a small bowl, whisk together all of the dry ingredients. Whisk in the ale and the vinegar. Pour the mixture into a small saucepan. Simmer until mustard is at your desired consistency (it will thicken up a bit more once it cools [I used the back of a spoon test that you might use if you were making a béchamel]). Pour the mixture into a storage container and store in the refrigerator.

Results and Reflection

I successfully used the lessons I learned in the last post to turn down some of the spiciness on this mustard. The flavor of the brown ale came through much more than I had expected it to which was a nice surprise. I usually eat all of these mustards on pretzels—as you can probably tell from the signature pretzel in almost all of the finished product images—but I really think this one will shine with a nice German sausage and some potatoes.

Finished and pretzeled.  Photo by K. Stenz

Finished and pretzeled.
Photo by K. Stenz

 

NEXT WEEK: FRUIT MUSTARD

Honey Mustard

Hello there, mustard pals. I received a few requests for honey mustard so here’s your mustard, honeys (I felt weird writing that but it couldn’t really be helped). I meant for this recipe to be basically the easiest thing ever but it turned out quite differently than I had planned. I’m sure that it could still be easy but I didn’t plan ahead very well and I created quite a lot more work for myself than I needed to. I’m going to write the recipe and method in the way that I actually went about making this because it feels more honest. I originally ended up with a much more watery mustard than I wanted so I cooked it down in a pot like you would with any other kind of sauce. This had the added benefit of reducing some unwanted spiciness. So if you want your honey mustard to turn out just like mine, you can follow exactly as written. However, you could also just only add as much liquid as you want in order to reach your desired consistency.

A note about spiciness

After ending up with a much spicier mustard last week than I really wanted, I consulted a biochemist about what was actually making the mustard spicy and how I could bend those chemicals to my will. I was fed up with the vague explanations and the contradictory advice I found on the internet and I sought out a professional. This is essentially what he told me: If you want to reduce or eliminate the spiciness of the mustard, you need to either heat the seeds or soak them in acid. Heating the seeds before adding any water should be most effective at taming the spiciness. Vinegar isn’t a very powerful acid which is why you can still end up with a very spicy mustard even if you add it with the water.

In practice, this honey mustard was a bit spicier than I wanted it to be but after I simmered it in a pot to reduce the water, it’s not spicy at all and it is delicious. I’ll be using this knowledge again. Thank you, science (and specifically, scientist).

Here’s what you’ll need:

015

Mustard seed, ground yellow mustard, apple cider vinegar
brown sugar, turmeric, salt with garlic powder and paprika, water
honey

Yield: about ½ cup

Dry Stuff:

  • 1/8    cup mustard seeds
  • 1/8    cup dried mustard powder
  • 1        tsp light brown sugar
  • 1/2     tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4     tsp turmeric
  • 1/8     tsp paprika
  • 1/8     tsp garlic powder

Liquids:

  • 3/8 cup water
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/8 cup honey

Method

Dry ingredients not yet mixed

Dry ingredients not yet mixed

Grind the mustard seeds to a fine powder. In a small, microwave-safe bowl, whisk

together all of the dry ingredients. Whisk in the water until well combined. Wait for sixty seconds. Whisk in the vinegar. Place the bowl in the microwave and heat for one minute. Remove the bowl from the microwave and puree the mixture with a blender, immersion blender, or food processor for one minute (an immersion blender would be best but I used a food processor with fairly good results). Pour mixture into storage container. Become basically disappointed in your results at this point. Frown at mustard. Pour mixture back out of storage container and into a small saucepan. Simmer until mustard is at your desired consistency (it will thicken up a bit more once it cools [I used the back of a spoon test that you might use if you were making a béchamel]). Pour back into a storage container and store in the refrigerator.

Results and Reflection

After all of that, it turned out to be very tasty! It may not have been exactly as I planned it but isn’t that how life can be? Everything worked out well and I would definitely make this again, probably even in the same way but with less disappointment and more intent. The key idea to take from all of this is that making mustard isn’t like making a soufflé, there is plenty of room to just make it up as you go along.

 

Finished product

Finished product

 

NEXT WEEK: BEER MUSTARD (?!)

 

 

 

 

Brown Mustard

Welcome back to Mustard Blog. This week I’ve taken a look at a somewhat rustic brown mustard. Brown mustard is the ideal October mustard. For me, nothing complements brats or soft pretzels like some nice spicy brown mustard. Although what I’m making here isn’t really a Dusseldorf style mustard, I’m sure it will still be tasty on a fresh-off-the-grill brat.

Brown mustard requires some special consideration. If you aren’t careful, you could easily create something that is completely inedible. I was little intimidated by the brown mustard seeds when I was preparing this recipe so I used warm water and added the water and vinegar at the same time. I still ended up with a fairly bitter and spicy mustard so I think I made the right choice. I like a little heat in my mustard but it can be kind of scary if you’re looking up recipe ideas and everybody mentions mustard gas.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Yield: about ½ cup

brown mustard

Clockwise from top: water and vinegar, ground mustard, brown sugar, brown mustard seed
-photo by Katie Stenz

Dry stuff:

  • 3        tbsp brown mustard seeds
  • 2        tbsp dried yellow mustard powder
  • 1        tsp light brown sugar
  • 1/2     tsp kosher salt
  • 1/8     tsp garlic powder

Liquids:

  • 3         tbsp water
  • 1         tbsp white wine vinegar

Method

Set aside one third of the brown mustard seeds. Using whatever method you fancy, grind two thirds of the brown mustard seeds to a fairly coarse consistency. In a small microwave-safe bowl, combine all of the dry ingredients and whisk them together. Add the remaining brown mustard seeds that are not ground. In a separate bowl, combine water and vinegar. Slowly whisk the liquid mixture into the dry ingredients until well combined. Place the mixture in the microwave and heat for thirty seconds. Remove the mixture from the microwave and whisk once more to evenly distribute heat. Pour mixture into a storage container. Cover and store in the refrigerator.

Finished product with a pretzel Photo by Katie Stenz

Finished product
Photo by Katie Stenz

Dry stuff Photo by Katie Stenz

Dry stuff
Photo by Katie Stenz

Results and Reflection

I was right to be somewhat hesitant. Even with the precautions I that I took, the mustard came out fairly spicy. It was also thicker than I had intended which I thought was a pleasant surprise but if you don’t feel the same way, you can just add a bit more liquid until you’re happy. I like this particular mustard with a bit more substance so that it can stand up to the pastrami that I will undoubtedly pair it with. I encourage you to do the same and then maybe you too can spend the next week taking part in that debate.

 

NEXT WEEK: HONEY MUSTARD

 

Yellow Mustard

First up, yellow mustard! I’ve adapted this recipe from one of good old Alton Brown’s (and you should definitely make his as well), but I’ve tried to simplify it in order to focus on the basic techniques that you can use with any mustard style. If there’s any one thing I want to show you in this first recipe, it’s that even seemingly boring yellow mustard is capable of variety and excitement. You could make this recipe dozens of times, with the exact same ingredients, and come up with different results every time. The key feature in this recipe is the time you spend between adding the water and adding the vinegar. The moment you add the water to the fresh ground mustard seeds, your mixture starts to get hotter (not physically hotter but sinus destroying hotter). Cold water will result in a spicier mustard. When you add an acid, in this case apple cider vinegar, the reaction stops and the heat you taste in the mustard will be basically set. About.com has a good explanation of this process.  In this recipe, I waited for one minute before adding the vinegar because I wanted a bit of spice without overwhelming my taste buds. If you want a milder mustard, add the vinegar as you add the water. For a hotter mustard, just wait longer before adding the vinegar, but be careful because the heat can get intense surprisingly quickly. Finally, make the mustard, taste it, then just relax. The mustard will mellow out after a day or so in the fridge.

Here’s what you’ll need:

Yield: about ½ cup

The Stuff of Mustard

(Left to right) Back row: ground mustard, turmeric, apple cider vinegar. Front row: yellow mustard seed, brown sugar, water
photo by Katie Stenz

Dry stuff:

  • 1/8    cup mustard seeds
  • 1/8    cup dried mustard powder
  • 1        tsp light brown sugar
  • 1/2     tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4     tsp turmeric
  • 1/8     tsp paprika
  • 1/8     tsp garlic powder

Liquids:

  • 3/8 cup water
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

Method

So many powders

Dry Ingredients
Photo by Katie Stenz

Don't eat it yet.

Mixed but not yet heated
Photo by Katie Stenz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In your spice grinder (I used a cheap old coffee grinder I had sitting around that basically looks like this), grind the mustard seeds to a fine powder. In a small, microwave-safe bowl, whisk together all of the dry ingredients. Whisk in the water until well combined. Wait for sixty seconds. Whisk in the vinegar. Place the bowl in the microwave and heat for one minute. Remove the bowl from the microwave and puree the mixture with a blender, immersion blender, or food processor for one minute (an immersion blender would be best but I used a food processor with fairly good results). Pour mixture into storage container. Cover and store in the refrigerator.

 

Finished Product Photo by Katie Stenz

Finished Product
Photo by Katie Stenz

Mixture after being heated

Mixture after being heated
Photo by Katie Stenz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Results and Reflection

I’m extremely satisfied with how this turned out. Frankly, going into it, I wasn’t so sure. But this turned out really well. Surprisingly well. I was looking for a little kick in this and letting it sit for sixty seconds resulted in the perfect amount of heat. If you make this, which you should, put on your scientist coat and make two batches so you can let one sit and then you can compare the heat at the end. It will be fun and it will give you a good idea about creating heat in the rest of the mustards we’re going to make. Leave a comment with your results or any questions.

 

 

NEXT WEEK: RUSTIC BROWN MUSTARD

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to Mustard Blog!

Welcome

This is going to be a sort of journey. An exploration. A voyage into the beautiful potential that is homemade mustard. I’m setting out to experiment with a wide range of mustard flavors and combinations so that you don’t have to. From yellow mustards to sweet mustards to beer mustards and perhaps even some strange and exotic mustards, I plan to make and taste as many as I can. I hope you’ll join me.

What to Expect

Each week, I’ll be taking on a new style of mustard. I’ll start with a pretty basic yellow mustard and work up to more adventurous combinations of flavors as time goes on and as I grow bolder. I’ll be sharing recipes and pictures of all my attempts so that if you’re feeling particularly inspired, you can try them out yourself.

Where I’m Starting

At this point, you may be under the impression that I’m some sort of mustard expert. Allow me to assure you that I am not. In fact, I’ve never made any kind of mustard before. But why should we be limited to the flavors of mustard offered to us on the supermarket shelves? Mustard may seem like just another bland condiment to put on a hot dog, but I suggest that it can be something more. I think mustard can be just as capable of nuance and variety of flavor as craft beer and that there’s no reason we shouldn’t approach it with the same interest and dedication. We’ve been exploring what’s outside Miller and Budweiser, I think it’s time we move past Heinz® and French’s®.

A Few Mustard Resources

NEXT WEEK: YELLOW MUSTARD

IMG_0681

Photo by Katie Stenz