Safety of Students

October 27th, 2014 by Sarah Winkelmann in Uncategorized

College campuses are full of diversity and UW-Whitewater is no exception to this, however differing opinions lead to conflict. Recently there have been a couple issues on campus, bringing some serious safety concerns to the attention of residents and police alike.

The night scene at UW-Whitewater a totally different atmosphere than the one during the daylight when students are rushing between classes.

Students work so hard during the day that sometimes at night or on the weekends not everything is thought through. Taking one minute to think a situation through can avoid a conflict or getting involved in one in the first place.

However this is easier said than done, when most students are put into that situation it is important for them to hold their pride and handle it by themselves.

But it is important to remember it is never a bad idea to get the police involved. As police chief of the University Police Matthew Kiederlan says, “Our main goals are safety, service, and prevention.”

The campus police offer several courses ranging from street smarts to self-defense for the students. If someone is walking home at night and feels uncomfortable there is a hotline they can call 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

All someone would have to do is pull out their cell phone or go to one of the several emergency booths and dial 4660 for a police escort home.

As junior Abrielle Backhaus says, “I have never used this service but makes feel safer knowing it is an option and wouldn’t hesitate to use it if I was in an uncomfortable situation.”

Even while out and about and it seems like a scary scenario is building it doesn’t hurt to just scream out because other people or authorities will hear.

Jessica Belongia, a sophomore who lives on campus shares some other great advice, “I always walk with a group of friends while going out at night.”

There are many situations that can be avoided all together if there is not one person traveling on or off campus alone.
“We have patrol on the street in our squad cars and protection on the sidewalks with our force on bicycle and foot,” said Police Chief Matthew Kiderlen.

One thing to always remember is that crime will never cease to exist but there are better ways to control it.
The key aspect is to get people aware that it not completely stoppable but just under control. The University of Wisconsin-Whitewater is known for its fine academics and pristine athletic programs, not the violence or crime of the student population.


Steve Jobs Inspires Graduates

October 18th, 2014 by Sarah Winkelmann in Uncategorized

Steve Jobs left the graduating class of 2005 at Stanford University with the words, “Stay hungry. Stay Foolish.” But that small piece advice for the future is one part of the puzzle that Jobs shared with graduates during his commencement speech.

Jobs was a firm believer that everything happens for a reason and that all day the dots will all connect. He understands that this might scare some people because there is no way to connect dots in the past but rather hope and wait for them to all line up in the future.

There were a couple of times during his life that he didn’t know what his next move was or where he was going to do. This trend started right after birth for the newborn when his biological mother put him up for adoption and then his new parents decided they wanted a girl instead.

Jobs was later adopted and didn’t face a moment of feeling lost again until he made it through his first semester at Reed College, when he dropped out and had no idea what he wanted to do.

Luckily for Jobs, he did not need a college degree to succeed in his career. He and a friend started what is now a $2 billion company, known as Apple, when he was 20 years old in his parents’ garage.

After starting this company it would seem that Jobs had all of his dots connecting and he knew just how the rest of his life would pan out without any sense of being lost.

However, fear of the unknown struck him yet again, when he was fired from his own company. Jobs recalls this time in his life by saying, “So at 30 I was out. And very publicly out. What had been the focus of my entire adult life was gone, and it was devastating.”

The years following what may have seemed as his worst hardship was filled with new discovers and positive experiences. During the recovery years Jobs started the companies NeXT and Pixar and he also met his wife.

After thinking his situation through he shares with the students, “I’m pretty sure none of this would have happened if I hadn’t been fired from Apple. It was awful tasting medicine, but I guess the patient needed it.”

While giving his speech he used “patient” as a metaphor however soon it would become all too real. About a year ago he became a cancer patient with a tumor on his pancreas given only three to six months to live.

This is the most recent time when Jobs felt lost in his own life, not knowing what his next move was, or if there was even time for him to get his life back on track again. “My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order, which is doctor’s code for prepare to die…It means say your goodbyes.”

But Jobs was not ready to say goodbye and after a biopsy the doctors discovered it was a very rare form that had a cure.
It seems that in his 55 years here on planet Earth, Steve Jobs lived and thrived through incredible odds. He accomplished so much, failed numerous times and just plain endured an enormous amount of triumph and strife.

Even though Jobs is still under 60 he has lived beyond his years and has an incredible story to share, it is extremely inspiring to young innovative people.

Near the end of his speech he says, “Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.” Jobs saw this as the best way to view life and after hearing his story, he just might be on to something.


UWW Dance Team Holds Kids’ Clinic

October 13th, 2014 by Sarah Winkelmann in Uncategorized

As three year old Rosie walked onto the football field to perform with the UW-Whitewater dance team the jam packed stadium replied all in unison with a hearty “awww.” Once she actually started dancing with the team and the other young girls participating the crowd erupted with laughter and cheers.

This sighting is a once in a year opportunity during family fest when the UWW dance team holds a kid’s clinic for the community of Whitewater and all the families associated with the University.

*All of the children that participated in the clinic were able to learn a dance with the team, received a t-shirt, a set of pom pons, a snack, and a chance to perform on the turf at Perkin’s stadium.

One of the student coaches, Tori Ranieri said, “The kid’s clinic is a fundraiser to benefit the spirit program and a great way to involve the youth of the local community.”

Some participants were local however others included family and friends of students, faculty and staff at UW-Whitewater.
However on the cold and rainy Saturday the number of attendees was down this year.

Coach Stephanie Spickler explained, “I think a lot of parents don’t want to sit in the cold rain and have their child out in that weather just to dance on the field.”

A handful of young girls and their families did brave the weather during the game. It was a pleasant temperature where the day started out, inside of the William’s Center in the basketball gym, when the dance team taught a short routine to the kids.

Two members of the team volunteer to choreograph a dance for the kids and then they are in charge of teaching and demonstrating during the clinic. All the other team members wander around and help any struggling students.

One of the choreographers, Selena Burton said, “I love working with kids and it is so fun to do what I love and teach kids at the same time.”

All of the members of the team really look forward to this weekend every year because it is so the kids’ smiles just light up their faces.

Spickler said,” Sometimes with all the rigorous practices we hold each week we forget what a passion we all have for dance and it comes out again when we are able to share that with these kids.”


Mayor Releases Proposed Budget

October 6th, 2014 by Sarah Winkelmann in Uncategorized

Kittatinny has been through major adjustments with the downsizing at Susquehanna Steel Corporation but it appears their worries are far from over with the new proposed budget for 2015.

Mayor Gustavus G. Petykiewicz is certain about one necessity in the proposed budget, the increase in taxes is a must. Petykiewicz has recommended a raise of 0.3 mils but is open to suggestions from the public.

Perhaps the largest concern is going to come from some proposed cuts, especially with the reduced hours of staffed Kittatinny police officers.

After hearing the proposed budget the president of Kittatiny City Council, Denalda Penoyer says, “I understand the mayor’s position…but the change in police protection is the number one concern.”

There will be no officers during 4 a.m. till noon, leaving any emergency calls to the closest Schuylkill County sheriff’s deputy.

Just as the Chief of Police, Roman Hruska puts it, “I cannot stand idly by and watch a city of this size be deprived of police by one third each day.”

Bjarne Westoff, the president of Pennsylvania Police Association Local 34, pointed out “the mayor and the police chief do not get along and I do not think this will pass.” This would be dangerous to citizens and a huge adjustment for all.

Another change in the effort to save money would be by taking garbage pickup off of the tax levy and charging residents for the service.

With the mindset to save money, many are questioning the mayor’s decision to purchase a drivable weed-removal vehicle. Petykiewicz assures the public that this is necessary to keep tourists coming to town to visit the city beach at White Deer Lake.

Martha Mittengrabben, president of AFSCME Local 644, is not so concerned about the tourists but rather is “afraid more people will leave town.”

Without new jobs to turn to there are now 600 people in the city of Kittatiny without any income. As Hruska says, “I think it is only fair that the mayor and I would take a 10 percent pay cut.”

The proposal is for a pay freeze for all local leaders but they have all agreed to take the cut together to better the community. Petykiewicz reminds people, “These cuts will affect me as a citizen as well.”

The mayor hopes that everyone understands this is a budget emergency so he is encouraging people to come to him with questions and ideas. But he is positive that, “together we will figure this out.” The document will be available online at www.kittatiny.gov.


Mayor Realeases Proposed Budget

October 6th, 2014 by Sarah Winkelmann in Uncategorized

Kittatinny has been through major adjustments with the downsizing at Susquehanna Steel Corporation but it appears their worries are far from over with the new proposed budget for 2015.

Mayor Gustavus G. Petykiewicz is certain about one necessity in the proposed budget, the increase in taxes is a must. Petykiewicz has recommended a raise of 0.3 mils but is open to suggestions from the public.

Perhaps the largest concern is going to come from some proposed cuts, especially with the reduced hours of staffed Kittatinny police officers.

After hearing the proposed budget the president of Kittatiny City Council, Denalda Penoyer says, “I understand the mayor’s position…but the change in police protection is the number one concern.”

There will be no officers during 4 a.m. till noon, leaving any emergency calls to the closest Schuylkill County sheriff’s deputy.

Just as the Chief of Police, Roman Hruska puts it, “I cannot stand idly by and watch a city of this size be deprived of police by one third each day.”

Bjarne Westoff, the president of Pennsylvania Police Association Local 34, pointed out “the mayor and the police chief do not get along and I do not think this will pass.” This would be dangerous to citizens and a huge adjustment for all.

Another change in the effort to save money would be by taking garbage pickup off of the tax levy and charging residents for the service.

With the mindset to save money, many are questioning the mayor’s decision to purchase a drivable weed-removal vehicle. Petykiewicz assures the public that this is necessary to keep tourists coming to town to visit the city beach at White Deer Lake.

Martha Mittengrabben, president of AFSCME Local 644, is not so concerned about the tourists but rather is “afraid more people will leave town.”

Without new jobs to turn to there are now 600 people in the city of Kittatiny without any income. As Hruska says, “I think it is only fair that the mayor and I would take a 10 percent pay cut.”

The proposal is for a pay freeze for all local leaders but they have all agreed to take the cut together to better the community. Petykiewicz reminds people, “These cuts will affect me as a citizen as well.”

The mayor hopes that everyone understands this is a budget emergency so he is encouraging people to come to him with questions and ideas. But he is positive that, “together we will figure this out.” The document will be available online at www.kittatiny.gov.


Small Town, Big Tragedy

September 22nd, 2014 by Sarah Winkelmann in Uncategorized

On September 11, 2011 the country was grieving over the 10th anniversary of the day that all Americans hold close to their heart. Unfortunately for Stephanie Busse another, tragedy struck her three days later.

The next day her life changed when she received a text from a high school friend that asked, “Are you ok, Steph?” Her friend was concerned about her because Stephanie’s boyfriend of 5 years was just killed in an accident while working on an oil rig in North Dakota.

Busse drove from her college in Minnesota to her home town in Wisconsin to be with her family and friends. Stephanie had what she explained as “the best support system around” but still felt that she needed to move on with her life and came up with a solution.

In order to help grieve and process death, she grabbed a notebook and started to write down important events throughout the couple’s relationship. She logged everything from the moment she met him at the FFA Quiz Bowl in seventh grade to the text she received from him the day he passed away.

While studying abroad in Australia she finished writing her “love story”. Her friends read the story and encouraged Stephanie to publish it. “I never imagined I would put so much personal information in the hands of the public,” she recalled. But Busse pursued it anyway and once she was back in the U.S. she met with her high school teacher to discuss the possibilities of the next step.

Together they worked on forming the rough draft into a manuscript. Then they did some research online on how to publish a book. The two discovered the next task was to create a query letter to make the book marketable for publishing companies.

However the first several returned with “no” replies. Busse said when she started losing hope Publish America requested the full manuscript. Stephanie signed the contract, agreed to the terms and conditions and “Wagon Wheel” was published in October of 2012.

Since then, the book has become well-liked by many. It is inspiring teens everywhere that love does exist. More than that it demonstrates the courage this young couple had and the strength that Stephanie possesses to share her story.

Busse said she misses Brendan more and more every day but she does not let the longing control her life. She recently graduated from Winona State University and currently has an internship in a probation office in Denver, Colo.

Even though Stephanie is one busy lady, she never forgets time for her “Brendy”. She helped organize the Brendan Wagner Lawrence Lake Fishery in his memory as well as a memorial scholarship at their local high school.

Just like one week ago, on the three year anniversary of his passing, she spent the day hiking to celebrate the life of a very special person. Brendan is sure not to be forgotten with all that credit he is given by family and friends. But with this book it is certain that Stephanie Busse made tragic experience into one of inspiration and hope for the future.


About Me

September 9th, 2014 by Sarah Winkelmann in Uncategorized

Sarah Winkelmann is a sophomore at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. She is majoring in Broadcast Journalism with a dance minor. Sarah is from Portage, Wisconsin where she was a three sport athlete in high school and the captain of her dance team. She currently is a member of the UWW Dance Team and an anchor on the UWWTV show Wake-Up Whitewater. 


Hello world!

September 8th, 2014 by Sarah Winkelmann in Uncategorized

Welcome to Blogs.uww.edu. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!