Bring Your Chapstick

Hey y’all,

One of the things I’ve had to learn since moving to Wisconsin is how to protect myself from drying out during winter! The brutal cold and dry atmosphere causes my skin, lips, and hair to dry out, and then I spend the rest of the year trying to repair the damage done. Luckily by my third winter I’ve figured out a few tricks to help prevent this.

Chapped Lips

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Burt’s Bees Chapstick

I never truly realized what chapped lips were until moving to Wisconsin. Being a typical girl, I usually carried a tube with me in my backpack at home, but in Wiconsin, especially in the winter, it’s a necessity that I never leave home without. The cold dry winters cause my lips to crack and chap after just a few days in below freezing weather. So I suggest stocking up on some heavy duty chapstick before enduring the cold.

Despite being extremely popular right now, I would advise against EOS chapstick. Although it smells good and it’s packaged cutely, it doesn’t provide your lips near enough protection. My go-to chapstick will always be Burts Bees. Burt’s Bees is a beeswax lip balm that intensely moisturizes and protects my lips from cracking in the cold.

But no matter what brand you prefer, make sure you always have some on hand. It’s a lifesaver.

Wind Burn

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Aquaphor

One of the aspects of winter I struggle with most is the dry skin I get from wind burn. Many of the students at Whitewater call the areas the second windy city. Sometimes I use walking to class as my leg workout for the day because I have to push against the force of the wind so much it exhausts me! Along with this, a lot of times I’ll end up with dry, chapped cheeks from how cold and hard the winds are.

An easy solution I’ve found for this is Aquaphor. Aquaphor is a lotion/gel that people most commonly use on babyies and new tattoos. It provides intense moisture to the area you apply it on. I keep a tub of it on hand throughout winter and apply a tiny bit (a little goes a long way) when I feel like I’ve gotten wind burn. the only issue with this is that the product is very oily and can sometimes cause break-outs. I just make sure I thoroughly wash my face later that day and that usually prevents it.

Dry Hair

Moving from Tennessee, where it’s humid 24/7, to Wisconsin where the winters are brutally¬†cold has ruined my hair. Every morning I have to blow dry my hair (destroying it with heat) because if I go outside with it wet, it’ll freeze! I’ll end up sitting in class for the next hour as my crunchy, frozen hair thaws and dries. So instead of suffering through this, I blow it dry every day, which as most girls know, is horrible for your hair. And now I spend more time in class splitting my already split-ends than I do paying attention to anything my professors say. Luckily, I have found some pretty great solutions to help keep my luscious locks through the winter.

Coconut Oil

Coconut oil is my solution for almost everything, but most importantly my hair! As weird as it sounds, I drench my hair in this moisture magic at least twice a week. For best results, glob a handful of coconut oil and massage it into your hair, focusing on the ends. Leave this in for a half hour (this can get messy so have a towel on hand!) then wash it out in the shower. You may have to wash your hair twice to get all the oil out, but you’re supposed to lather, rinse and REPEAT anyways so this isn’t too much of a hassle. You should see major improvements after doing this twice.

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Garnier-Fructis Damage Eraser

Damage Eraser

If coconut oil doesn’t appeal to you, there are plenty of products you can buy that work well too. One that I love is Garnier-Fructis Damage Eraser- Split Ends. This is an inexpensive, easy-to-use product. Simply rub it all over your ends when you get out of the shower. This is my go-to product when I don’t have time to use coconut oil.

 

Just like the trees die in the winter, so does my hair. These few beauty tips have been lifesavers the past year. Just prepare yourself for the cold and know that the damage can always be undone.

Until next time,

Hannah Lee

NEXT WEEK: Benefits of Both

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