Module 3 first post was the wrong copy

Today I am going to answer a few important questions about different perspectives of learning, the limitations and importance of these, and my own personal belief. First I will go over the differences between behaviorist and cognitive perspectives of learning. “The behaviorist perspective of learning focuses on the new behaviors themselves that are learned” (pg. 312). These are things like controlling your classroom so you can create the best possible learning environment for your students. So in this philosophy we learned a lot about how to motivate students to behave appropriately and do their work. Whereas “cognitive perspective discusses more about the knowledge and strategies are learned, then changes in knowledge and strategies make changes in behavior possible” (pg. 312). We are taught the different levels of cognitive development and how to teach at these different stages. Even more importantly we learned about how students actually process information and what their memory capacity is and how we can get our students to effectively retain the most amount of information possible. Both of these concepts are very important to apply to your class room instruction because it allows us as teachers to create the best possible learning environment in our classroom. It also allows for us to understand different laws of learning. This understanding will give us knowledge on how our students’ brains work and develop, which allows for us to structure our teaching in a way that our students will be able to retain the most possible amount of information during our lesson. For cognitive learning some of the limitations we have as teachers is that you have to teach in a way that coincides with the level of cognitive development you class falls under. An even harder aspect is appealing to all students. This is really hard because all students develop at different times. This means that some of your students may not be developmentally ready to retain some of the material you are teaching them. As a result teachers must carefully think through how they present their material. As for behavioral development, we have some of the same issues as cognitive development but some new challenges as well. For example, in order to create the best learning environment possible for your class you may have to kick students out of the room or have them sit away from the rest of the class. The challenge with this is you need to find a balance where that student isn’t taking away the ability for students around him to learn while at the same time your punishment shouldn’t be taking away from their ability to learn. After looking at the table on page 468 I felt the rolls of the teacher and student were very good. However, I disagree with the idea that peers have no role in behavioral and cognitive development. I disagree with this because I feel like peers have a huge roll in both of these. For behavioral, I feel that if students watch their peers behave in the correct manner they are much more likely to copy their behavior so they can conform. In addition, cognitive learning from peers is one of the most effective tools a student can have. Through all your years in school you are going to have the same classmates basically until college so it’s crucial that students learn how to use one another as a resource to gain new information. Kids seem to learn the best from kids and I know for a fact the best way for someone to learn is by teaching someone else. When I become a teacher I know I will apply these different strategies in my classroom in the hope of creating the best learning environment possible.

Module 2

Eddie Petrak

 

 

There are many different ways people develop and construct knowledge. Different kids go through different developmental changes at different times so as a result it’s our jobs as teachers to appeal to all students. Piaget does a great job of outlining these different stages of development. Piaget figured out that students develop cognitively as they grow just like how they grow psychically. So he created four stages of development. The first stage is from the years 0-2 and during this stage he said children develop sensorimotor skills. This means during this age gap children gather information about the world trough sight, smell, taste, hearing, and touch. The next stage is the preoperational stage which happens between the ages 2-7. During this stage children start to engage in pretend play and they start to understand symbols. Next we have the concrete operational stage, this occurs between the ages of 7-11. During this stage kids begin to understand mathematics and form the ability to understand sizes and portions “water in glass experiment”. Last from the ages 12 and up children enter the formal operational stage. During this stage kids are able to reason about different concepts and moral reasoning is believed to be developed during this stage. However I feel that one of the biggest impacts on a student’s learning is the classroom environment. Luckily this is something we can control as teachers. However it can be a challenging to find what forms of discipline your students respond best. As they go through different stages of development teachers must also adapt and use different types of reinforces. One of the most effective ways to influence all aged student’s behavior according to (Alper and Heward 1997, p. 277; Alber and Heward, 2000) “the systematic application of praise and attention may be the most powerful motivational and classroom management tool available to teachers”. By carefully selecting when to give attention and praise to students we influence them to behave properly. By being selective once praise is given it has an even stronger impact on your students. This concept is the same way inflation works with currency. If you just constantly print out and give people hundred dollar bills eventually it won’t be worth anything. This is because if everyone has hundreds of dollars available to them it won’t carry the same value it once had. So as a teacher you have to be extremely selective when you give out both negative and positive reinforcement so it will have significance when you use it. Although teacher reinforcement can be very effective in your classroom you must find other meaningful reinforces in order to further impact students behavior. This is where the response cost theory comes into play. As described by Walker, Shea, and Bauer (2004) “For certain infractions of the rules, people must lose some reinforcer-money, time, privileges”. Teacher reinforcement is great but if a student is behaving badly you need to have fair and meaningful punishments prepared to combat this behavior. The best way to find meaningful punishments is to observe what your students enjoy to do in their free time. However there are some cautions you should be aware of before you give out a punishment however. Students must be fully aware of the classroom rules and the repercussions of breaking one of these rules. Another important thing we must understand as teachers is that just giving out a punishment ineffective. This is because “It tells students what to stop doing (often they knew that already), but it does not teach them what to do instead (Kazdin, 2008). This is a crucial aspect in changing a student’s behavior because it teaches them what they can do to avoid getting in trouble again. Hopefully by reading this post you will be able to grasp a better knowledge on how to effectively impact your student’s behavior inside your classroom. If you are able to use some of the methods listed above you should be able to maintain the best possible learning environment for your class.

 

All information was taken out of our Educational Psychology book citation is below.

Anita Woolfolk, Alber, Heward, Walker, Shea, Bauer, and Kazdin. (2014). Educational Psychology 12 Edition.

Module 2 third blog post

There are many different ways people develop and construct knowledge. Different kids go through different developmental changes at different times so as a result it’s our jobs as teachers to appeal to all students. One of the biggest impacts on a student’s learning is the classroom environment. Luckily this is something we can control as teachers. However it can be a challenging to find what forms of discipline your students respond best. As they go through different stages of development teachers must also adapt and use different types of reinforces. One of the most effective ways to influence all aged student’s behavior according to (Alper and Heward 1997, p. 277; Alber and Heward, 2000) “the systematic application of praise and attention may be the most powerful motivational and classroom management tool available to teachers”. By carefully selecting when to give attention and praise to students we influence them to behave properly. By being selective once praise is given it has an even stronger impact on your students. This concept is the same way inflation works with currency. If you just constantly print out and give people hundred dollar bills eventually it won’t be worth anything. This is because if everyone has hundreds of dollars available to them it won’t carry the same value it once had. So as a teacher you have to be extremely selective when you give out both negative and positive reinforcement so it will have significance when you use it. Although teacher reinforcement can be very effective in your classroom you must find other meaningful reinforces in order to further impact students behavior. This is where the response cost theory comes into play. As described by Walker, Shea, and Bauer (2004) “For certain infractions of the rules, people must lose some reinforcer-money, time, privileges”. Teacher reinforcement is great but if a student is behaving badly you need to have fair and meaningful punishments prepared to combat this behavior. The best way to find meaningful punishments is to observe what your students enjoy to do in their free time. However there are some cautions you should be aware of before you give out a punishment however. Students must be fully aware of the classroom rules and the repercussions of breaking one of these rules. Another important thing we must understand as teachers is that just giving out a punishment ineffective. This is because “It tells students what to stop doing (often they knew that already), but it does not teach them what to do instead (Kazdin, 2008). This is a crucial aspect in changing a student’s behavior because it teaches them what they can do to avoid getting in trouble again. Hopefully by reading this post you will be able to grasp a better knowledge on how to effectively impact your student’s behavior inside your classroom. If you are able to use some of the methods listed above you should be able to maintain the best possible learning environment for your class.

All information was taken out of our Educational Psychology book citation is below.
Anita Woolfolk, Alber, Heward, Walker, Shea, Bauer, and Kazdin. (2014). Educational Psychology 12 Edition.

Module 2

Research is a huge component of our education system and it’s only going to get bigger. In order to be a successful educator you need to be up to date with the constant changes happening in our world today. It seems like every other day there is a new discovery or study that completely changes our perspective. Now with the internet, the amount of resources available to us are limitless and all at our fingertips. This boundless information creates a unique challenge for educators. As a teacher you must be very careful when selecting an article to share with your class. The adeptness to know if an article is not only relevant but accurate, makes the ability to have strong information literacy an essential skill. To have strong information literacy you must first be able to recognize that databases and sources are reliable. Next you must find an article that is not only up to date with current events but is also compatible to your student’s level of knowledge in your selected subject matter. Lastly, you’re obligated to find something that is contemplative and interesting.  Materials that will capture your student’s attention and make them reflect on the content you are trying to teach. As a future educator, I must possess very strong information literacy skills. As a teacher, I will have to discover relevant articles to share in the classroom, and also instruct students on how become informationally literate so they can perform their own research. The need to be informationally literate will only continue to expand and as an educator I must always remain current and aquire new sources of research.

Like any other student, I am not a fan of doing homework.  However, I do find it beneficial and important.  As a teacher, you need to assign a reasonable workload.   Quantity does not always equate to better student achievement.   “Assigning more homework does not lead to better homework performance when teachers do not consider other homework characteristics, specifically the purpose for each homework task (Epstein & Van Voorhis, 2001)”.  However, if the workload is practicable, homework is a great way for students to develop important time management skills. “Latter, Xu (2010) found a positive relationship between students’ grade level, organized environment, and homework time management”.  Although time management is an important skill for students to learn, it’s not the main reason why we are required to do homework. Assigning homework is not only a way for students to practice what they’ve learned, but also a way for students to “practice of concepts already discussed and preparation for upcoming material (Epstein & Van Voorhis, 2001)”. This is a very important tool for teachers.  It provides students with background knowledge and lets them jump right into the lesson. Homework also brings students to class with questions and a readiness to participate in discussion.  Finally, you cannot argue with the notion that “homework appears to have positive effects on student performance at all levels of achievement (Keith ; 1982, p. 251)”. Although I regret to admit, homework is an essential component to a quality education.   I must conclude that Mrs. Brandy Young is hampering her student’s educational growth by not assigning homework.

Works Cited

Valle, Antonio, et al. “Academic Goals, Student Homework Engagement, And Academic Achievement In Elementary School.” Frontiers In Psychology (2016): 1-10. Academic Search Complete. Web. 6 Feb. 2017.

 

Works Cited

Rosário, Pedro, et al. “Does Homework Design Matter? The Role Of Homework’s Purpose In Student Mathematics Achievement.” Contemporary Educational Psychology 43.(2015): 10-24. Academic Search Complete. Web. 6 Feb. 2017.

 

Works Cited

Maltese, Adam V., Robert H. Tai, and Fan Xitao. “When Is Homework Worth The Time? Evaluating The Association Between Homework And Achievement In High School Science And Math.” High School Journal 96.1 (2012): 52-72. Academic Search Complete. Web. 6 Feb. 2017.

 

Works Cited

Natriello, Gary, and Edward L. McDill. “Performance Standards, Student Effort On Homework, And Academic Achievement.” Sociology Of Education 59.1 (1986): 18-31. Academic Search Complete. Web. 6 Feb. 2017.

First Blog Post

My name is Eddie Petrak,

I am from Burr Ridge Illinois located about 20-30 minutes south of the Chicago and I am sophomore here at whitewater majoring in physical education. Growing up I honestly hated going to school mostly because it was hard for me. However the one class I really excelled at was physical education. As a student I noticed that the students who excelled in other subjects were often more likely to substitute an extracurricular activity for gym class. And for the few who did go to class were less likely to participate. Unfortunately the lack of participation was a common trend among all students. Lucky for me I had a great health teacher named Mr. Bondi who I met through our schools bass fishing club. We both shared an interest in fishing and soon were able to connect on a personal level. Mr. Bondi helped me see the value physical education and explained the many issues that are going on in the field. The best part of physical education is that it allows you to have a truly unique impact on your students’ lives. Unlike math and since where the majority of the information you learn will never be used again. Physical education allows for teachers to impact a person’s health for the rest of their lives. By having Mr. Bondi be a part of my life he helped me understand what it meant to be a good teacher. A good teacher is someone who can connect their content to their students and current issues that effects their lives and explain why their content is valuable to learn. Our textbook backed my claim by giving research that showed students are far more successful when their teacher is able to connect with them. The ability to understanding students likes and dislikes then tailoring their lesion to incorporate their student’s interests is what separated the good and bad teachers. I also read an article by Yona Leyser called the impact of training in mainstreaming techniques. In this article she explained just how big of an impact a teacher’s attitude has on their students. She explained how students merrier your behavior and often reflect the same amount of enthusiasm that you give. Clips one and two on D2L defend this claim and further shows that passion makes the teacher. The two clips are complete opposites in clip one we saw a passionate teacher which lead to a passionate audience. However in the second clip the teacher is simply presenting the information and doesn’t show to the audience the information is valuable to him so they in return have the same attitude. During my years in physical education I have mostly experienced teachers like the second clip. Because of the lack of passion towards physical education I think is one of the primary reasons our nation is so obese. I hope to be like the teacher in clip one so I can actually make an impact in students’ lives.