C&LD Internships: A Day in the Life

In present day, it seems like every entry level position out of college wants to see some sort of experience. This experience is usually gained through an internship. While the internship search can be daunting and challenging, there is a department on campus that offers great internships. As current interns for Career & Leadership Development, we spoke to other interns in the office to see how working here has not only given them job experience, but so much more.

We started in the SEAL office, where we talked to a few interns about what it is like being a part of SEAL and C&LD:

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“I love being an intern because of how connected we all are yet our jobs are all different. I also like working in such a busy atmosphere.”

-Shawn Giese, SEAL Homecoming Chair 

“I have really enjoyed my internship position with Career & Leadership Development. It has helped me grow as an individual and has really shaped the person I am today. The endless amount of opportunities and experiences that I have gained throughout this internship has helped me further my education and career path here at UW-Whitewater.”

-Kayhla Sadowski, SEAL Social Media Intern

“My time in Career & Leadership Development (C&LD) has changed my life. I know that sounds cliché, but I have a family in C&LD on the SEAL team. While I have only worked here this year, I have learned so much about entertainment, marketing, and students on campus. Working as the Large Event Intern has been one of the best decisions of my life, and I hope to learn more and grow as a student while on campus for the next two years.”

-Jessica Faust, SEAL Large Event Intern

After talking to those SEALS, we decided to go over to the PB Poorman Pride Center to see what the PRIDE Interns had to say: 

“The past 2 years being a PRIDE Intern in Career & Leadership Development have been so crucial to who I am as a leader. Every opportunity I’ve had has shaped me in ways that will not only help me in my career, but throughout the rest of my life.”

-Alyssa Reetz, PRIDE Intern

“Working as an intern in C&LD has helped me value myself and develop a professional identity.”

-Lisa Helms, PRIDE Intern

“C&LD has adopted me into their family!”

-Connell Patterson, PRIDE Intern

The next stop on our journey through C&LD brought us to the Student Involvement Office, where we talked to Hope Schmidt, the Community Service Intern:

“The confidence I have gained as a C&LD intern has been tremendous. Things I never thought I could do…I can now say I do.  Because of this internship opportunity, I feel like a better-rounded individual. I have learned skills that I can now take with me wherever I go after I leave UW-W!”

After all this traveling, we ended up back in our office that we share with Jamie Hinze, the Human Resources Intern and she gave us some insight into her experience in the department:

“During my first year with Career & Leadership Development, I was employed as a Customer Service Associate working at the front desk. This was a fun and flexible position that taught me how to provide exceptional customer service and significantly strengthened my interpersonal communication and problem solving skills. Later, I earned the title of Human Resources Intern – a new position in the department in which I assist in the coordination of departmental student employee experience, specifically in selection, professional development, and evaluation. This internship has allowed me to explore my interests and career goals while giving me the opportunity to network with employers, students, and UW-Whitewater staff. My supervisors are incredibly supportive of my goals and needs as a full-time student and they have tailored the experience to fit me.”

As you can see, there are many different facets of C&LD and each offers a different experience. Whether you are looking to be a social media guru, coordinate community service events, or just learn something new about UW-Whitewater and what it offers to students, C&LD is a great place to gain all these experiences and many more.

The applications are open until March 3rd! If you are looking for an internship and want to be a part of the C&LD family, then go to uww.edu/cld and apply today!

Taking the Risk

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In high school, if you had asked me to point out Whitewater, Wisconsin on a map, I would have had no idea where to look. I was just a girl from the North suburbs of Chicago looking for a great place to go to college. I would have never guessed that I would end up in the small town of Whitewater at this University.

Making this decision was not easy. I knew that Whitewater had a great business school, there were not too many students, and it wasn’t too far from home. However, being from the North suburbs of Chicago, there were not a lot of people who came here for school. I would most likely be the only person from my high school coming here, a scary thought to any freshman.

With that in mind, I decided to take the risk and attend this University. My random roommate ended up being from another North suburb that was just around 15 minutes from mine. We were both in the same boat. We knew that if we wanted to get the most out of our college experience we would have to get involved.

This brought us to sorority information nights. We went through recruitment and joined Delta Zeta. As a new freshman, I would have never thought that joining that organization would bring me to where I am today. My sorority sisters never failed to encourage me to take risks, like the one I had taken when I chose to attend Whitewater.

My junior year, I was elected as a co-recruitment chair for the Panhellenic Council, the governing body for sororities. I had no idea what I was getting myself into. Through this role I had the opportunity to attend the Association of Fraternal Values and Leadership conference in Indianapolis last winter. This conference gave me great insight into what it means to be a leader and how being Greek can help that.

Shortly after returning from the conference I decided to take another risk and apply to be on the Homecoming Steering Committee, something I quickly realized was nothing like I thought it was going to be. As the first semester of my senior year was coming to a close, I quickly realized that all these leadership positions that I had held were ending. I knew that I wanted to spend my last semester on campus giving back to something that had given me so many opportunities and helped me grow from the scared, lonely freshman I was to the confident senior that I am now. So I took my final risk and accepted this position as a Social Media Intern.

I am excited to spend my last semester here representing Career and Leadership by writing for this blog and posting from our various social media pages. I will be providing a student perspective on the scary process of searching for, applying to, interviewing for, and accepting jobs and internships.

Big Buildings to Open Roads: Jonathan Fera’s Journey to Happiness at UW-Whitewater

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Being born and raised in a big city, I became naïve of what was outside the Milwaukee city limits. The city was so fast and so vast that any other area seemed unexciting in comparison. That mindset did not last past the age of eighteen.

I decided to come to the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater during my senior year of high school. My advisers informed me of the College of Business and Economics at this institution and it’s positive reputation, so it seemed like the perfect fit. That career path only lasted two days into my time at UW-Whitewater until I switched to a communications major with an emphasis in public relations.

During the fall semester of my freshmen year, a strong depression caused by missing home and wanting to be around my family took over my life. I was socializing with people in my residence hall and in my classes, but it was never enough to be happy.

The city was calling my name to come home. After all, I missed the quick pace environment and diverse culture.

How was I going to spend the next three and a half years here? It was not until I opened my eyes to the amazing opportunities at UW-Whitewater that this attitude changed.

After talking to my Resident Assistant, she mentioned attending the spring involvement fair to look for student organizations to join. I had an interest in political communications after dropping the business major, so I joined the UW-Whitewater College Democrats.

I immediately got involved with the organization and started to make friends outside of my residence hall and classes. It was refreshing to have conversations with like-minded individuals that were passionate about the same things I was.

During my sophomore year, I joined the organization’s executive board as their Communications Director and the next year, was elected President.

Besides the College Democrats, I found the Whitewater Student Government (WSG) and the University Marketing and Media Relations Department.

I started attending Whitewater Common Council meetings because of my role as Intergovernmental Affairs Director for WSG. This allowed me to become more engaged in the community and be able to call Whitewater a new home.

It all happened so fast and I was so overwhelmed by my professional involvement that I began to lose sight of why I got involved in the first place: to be happy.

I was asked to join the Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity my junior year from some WSG colleagues. I did not think I was the kind of person to join a Greek organization.

When looking back at that decision, I wouldn’t take it back for the world.

This past semester, I assisted in coordinating the grassroots efforts of the WarhawksVote campaign for the gubernatorial election. This allowed me to have a say in promotional material, strategic messaging and online content through both WSG and University Marketing and Media Relations.

After the election was over, I wanted a new opportunity. I wanted a new project before entering the workforce. After all, this is the last semester to make the most out of what became the best four years of my life.

Fast-forwarding to present day, I am now the Career Social Media Intern for UW-Whitewater Career and Leadership Development. While WSG is a part of the Warhawk Connection Center, I have never worked for the department before.

I am excited by this new opportunity and exciting challenge to better myself and my craft, while helping others gain the skills, motivation and resources to find a job or student organization to join.

After the journey I had to pursue in finding my place at UW-Whitewater, I hope to make that process easier and less stressful for other students.

Career and Leadership Development has the resources and guidance to help students find their place at this institution. To motivate them to succeed and take chances. To help them be happy.

The Birth of a Student Leader: DeJuan Washington’s Journey

As I began my first semester as a first generation freshman here at the University of Wisconsin- Whitewater, I was plagued with various insecurities that forced me to question my value in higher education. Like many African American students at this institution, I struggled academically and saw little progress in my quest to mirror the academic performance of the majority population. I was lost. In search of guidance to aid me in my journey of academic excellence, I attended my first Black Student Union (BSU) meeting, a place where I would soon feel at home and culturally validated in an environment that was completely new for me.

As time progressed and I entered my second semester of my freshmen year, BSU became a place of common ground for me. I was able to connect with students who looked like me, thought like me, and more importantly we shared the same lived experience. It was almost as if we were a subculture within a larger culture that we had yet learned to conquer. The beauty of this experience was that even though we felt the clear division of cultures, we still managed to thrive and coexist with our majority peers.

It was during one of the weekly BSU meetings that a guest speaker, who I later learned was the Director of Career and Leadership Development (CLD) named Ron Buchholz, came in to speak about possible internship opportunities and the importance of getting involved on campus. Being the academically challenged freshmen that I was, I immediately skimmed over the information in the flier in search of the GPA requirement, and of course I didn’t meet the criteria. I did however skim over a position at the LGBT resource center that I knew would be great for me once I achieved the GPA requirement, so all hope wasn’t lost.

Following that meeting, I worked tirelessly to boost my GPA, spending long nights in the library, exchanging my thirsty Thursdays for study Thursdays, attending office hours and most importantly asking for help when needed. For the first time in my short lived colligate career, I felt like an actual college student. I taught myself how to properly prepare for exams, how to keep track of my progress in classes, and how to manage my time wisely. These self-acquired skills taught me to believe in myself and my capabilities. I also started to realize that although grades mattered, they didn’t define a person’s success. This realization gave me the motivation that I needed to apply for my first internship within Career and Leadership Development in spite of the many barriers that haunted me.

After completing the application and receiving a call back for an interview, I still had a tiny amount of doubt in my mind that I could obtain this position without meeting the criteria. As I walked into a tiny office to be interviewed, I encountered a warm greeting from a woman I’d later grow to love as Jan Bilgen. I immediately liberated myself of all anxiety, as she made me feel comfortable in her presence and I began to bare my soul as if my life (and bank account) depended on it. In what felt like only a few seconds, 30 minutes of conversation had passed before she informed me on the next steps to take if I were offered the position 2 weeks from then and we said our goodbye’s.

Two weeks later, as I sat in the basement computer lab of Benson hall typing away at my final English paper for the semester, my phone rings. At this point I figured it was a telemarketer as I’d forgotten all about the internship and quite frankly didn’t think I would get it.  When I answered the phone, I was greeted be the same welcoming voice I’d encountered two weeks prior, only this time she spoke with a level of suspense as if there was a purpose for her call. During the entire phone call, which lasted for all of 3 minutes, I still wasn’t able to convince myself that there was great news on the other side of the conversation. However, it was to my surprise that Jan Bilgen offered me the position as the new PRIDE intern for the PB Poorman Pride Resource Center located in Career and Leadership Development.

Obtaining a position in this office was critical to my development as a student leader for two reasons. For one, it thought me to always take a step out of faith, no matter if I couldn’t see what lies ahead. Secondly, it taught me to always believe that the impossible is in fact possible. If I had never believed in my capabilities, I would’ve never recognized my fullest potential; and if I’d considered my goal as impossible, I would’ve never made it to my current reality. These two things are vital to the success of student leaders, and this is why I’ll always be thankful for my internship experience with Career and Leadership Development.

After two years as a PRIDE intern and serving in various other leaderhip roles (Peer mentor, VP of BSU, McNair Scholar, ect.) , I’ve decided to take yet another step out on faith by accepting the position as the new Social Media Manager for Career and Leadership Development. While social media isn’t at all new to me, my lists of responsibilities are. In this position I’ll provide a fresh student perspective on topics ranging from career resources provided by CLD, leadership involvement opportunities, diversity and much more. Managing social media accounts such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and a blog, I’ll be fully committed to providing the general campus community with an array of essential information. It is my hope that my story has inspired you all to be leaders in your own right in spite of the obstacles and that you keep following me on the new journey I’ve begun.

How to Be a Leader in a Technology-Driven World

This post was written by Career & Leadership Development Leadership Advisor Melissa Grosso.

Being a leader can be tough in the most perfect of circumstances…add technology into the mix and it can be a downright pain!

One of my biggest pet peeves is when people are always on their phones or tablets in meetings or while they are having conversations with you and it what they are doing on their said phone or tablet has nothing to do with your meeting or conversation. My second pet peeve is that we have forgotten about the old school “face to face” meetings.

Cell Phones

Not everything can be communicated or solved through technology. Here are my top 5 tips for being a leader in a technology-driven world:

Not everyone has a smartphone or uses social media, believe it or not!  Branch out and use other “old school” methods. For example, if you want to communicate a conference schedule to the group, using an app like Involvio or Guidebook is great for those who have smartphones, but also remember that not everyone does. Have a handful of paper copies available for those who don’t have smart phones.

There is nothing better than a face to face, in the same room conversations! Understanding when to have an in-person conversation is a skill that many people, due to technology, are lacking. Don’t send a text or email to ask how your performance at a job has been or that you need to resign from your position. It’s always best to have these types of conversations in person. Intent or meaning can be lost when NOT communicating face to face.

LinkedIn is a great tool to network with, however, it drives me nuts when people I don’t know try to connect with me and they keep the generic “I’d like to add you to my professional network.” Well that’s awesome, but why should I connect with you, especially if I don’t even know you? I know there isn’t a lot of space in the box, but give the person you are trying to connect with a reason to connect with you – they will be happy to connect with you once they know the reason why.

Everyone learns or hears about things differently! Don’t always use just one form of communication when trying to connect with others. Try to figure out their preferred method of communication and use it. It might take longer, but in the end you will have a much more connected group with individuals who know you care.

Put down technology and have an honest uninterrupted conversation. These conversations can be the most powerful conversations where both people are engaged. The meaningful conversations that can come from being technology free are priceless.

Do you have any other tips or tricks of the trade for living and leading in a technology-driven world?

Photo by Irving Martinez.

Friday Favorites – Social Media Best Practices

Last Friday, I wrote about five things you absolutely shouldn’t do on social media. We’re taking a positive turn this week to explain five things that you should do on social media. While nothing beats face-to-face conversation, and I encourage you to have conversations with your peers and friends over coffee and not over the Internet, here are some tips to help you when you are on social media.

Social Media

Be Social

Social media is social. It’s about interacting with your friends, your followers, and your subscribers. While you don’t need to tweet, ‘Thanks for the follow!’ to everyone who follows you on Twitter, following them back is good enough.

Following people or companies, or ‘liking’ their page on Facebook, who work in the field you want to get into is a really great idea. If they post something you’re interested in, retweet them, or comment on their post. And, if someone tweets or comments on your post, always comment back or favorite their tweet.

Be Active

When social media was becoming more and more popular a couple of years ago, many people thought it was just a fad. (Hint – it’s not. Social media is here to stay!) You might have jumped on the Twitter bandwagon because all your friends were on Twitter, and then tweeted twice since you started a profile in 2009. If you have a profile on a social media network, make sure you are active on it. Post regularly. You don’t have to go overboard and post 18 times a day. Remember – quality over quantity.

Post About Things You’re Interested In

We all know that potential employers will Google you, and then probably look at your Facebook and Twitter profiles. They will see your recent tweets about how a company recovered from a scandal, and how their public relations managers really pulled things together, and think, ‘Wow, this person is really on top of their game. They’re tweeting about this recent thing that happened in the PR field – that’s awesome.’ Be an opinion leader on social media.

Be Respectful

This one is a no-brainer, for most people, at least. Don’t be a bully, don’t over share, don’t gossip, don’t be disrespectful. If you are nice and polite on social media, potential employers will be more likely to take you seriously than if you were a bully. If you choose to make your social media profiles public, your professors, peers, acquaintances, and supervisors will be able to see everything. Make sure what you’re doing on social media is positive and respectful.

Tweet others the way you would like to be tweeted (Haha. See what I did there?)

Have a Personality

I think that social media is a great way to express yourself. You can upload photos of your recent skydiving trip on Facebook, you can tweet about the funniest cat videos on YouTube, and you can blog about your new job. Different platforms require different ways to express yourself. For example, you wouldn’t post all your skydiving pictures on Twitter. That’s for Facebook! But you can still have fun with Twitter.

Add a little personality when you tweet or post. If you’re retweeting something on Twitter, add a little comment before the RT. If you’re sharing someone’s post on Facebook, add your own opinion. Don’t be stiff – you can have fun on social media!

Are there any other tips you think that are useful to do on social media?

Photo by Aslan Media.

Social Media – Friend or Foe?

This post was written by Career & Leadership Development staff Nicole Golden and Jan Bilgen.

For each of us, social media technologies create a number of opportunities to share, foster, learn and connect. With each opportunity there is a chance you might enhance your life or complicate it. Here are a few suggestions to insure that your social media interactions enhance your personal and professional life.

Social Media

No matter what, once it’s out there you can never take it back

Just because Facebook has a delete option on your posts and comments or on pictures doesn’t make it 100% true. Anything on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, etc. can be downloaded, or emailed around to any number of others or sites. Think of all the great and witty tweets or posts you’ve seen and how they’ve gone viral. What if that was a picture of you doing something questionable? Or a post or comment that was hurtful? Written in anger? Think twice before posting. Ask yourself, what do I hope to “add” to my presence on social media with this?

Consider multiple profiles

Separation isn’t always as a bad thing. If you don’t want to edit your statuses or think too hard before you click, consider having multiple profiles. Be very sure that those you “friend” or “follow” on each of those profiles should be there. I have a professional Twitter account where I only tweet work-related items of interest. LinkedIn connections that you accept should only be professional contacts if you choose to follow this approach. Because social media is an amazing tool to connect, most people start with friends and then blend in business connections, but consider the opposite. Seek professional connections first.  Starting a professional “profile” on a social media outlets will not only let you create your personal brand it will let you protect it.

Don’t let social media replace face to face connections

In today’s world, it is much too easy to only connect and communicate with people via social media. However, it requires technical interest and resources so might not be everyone’s first choice in connecting. Social media contacts should broaden in number and in quality your relationships. Relationships must have direct connections in order to be improved and maintained. That means face to face opportunities, phone calls, Skype, etc. in addition to what you are posting and tweeting. In order to have impact on what others perceive about you, you must be able to interpret their non-verbals and have a higher chance of being understood.

Know that social media (i.e Facebook and Twitter) can be huge time drains and drama vortex

Time seems to slip away if you’re plugged in 100% all the time. Being too “plugged-in” can hurt the task at hand, like homework or work in general. You may seem distracted to those you are around and is seldom positive multitasking. Use of social media can also impact your friendships in a negative way. It oftentimes is a method that individuals use to drag others into their problems or arguments. They also use it in a passive aggressive manner. Beef with something? Find a non-social media way to vent or clear the air of frustration- talk in person.

Remember, social media was created to connect and make the world more open and connected. According to Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook founder, “We hope to strengthen how people relate to each other and even if our mission sounds big, it starts small — with the relationship between two people.” So take a minute before you click, post and celebrate and make those relationships strong and productive!

Photo by Yoel Ben-Avraham.

Friday Favorites – Five Social Media No-No’s

Raise your hand if you have Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn. Raise your hand if you’ve ever posted something you regretted. Now, I can’t see you reading this, but I can imagine you have posted or tweeted something you later regretted, whether it was bashing your former boss, your ex-boyfriend, your professors, your parents, or the driver who cut right in front of you during rush hour.

Bad-mouthing (or should we call it bad-tweeting?) is just one common mistake that many people make online. The thing about having social media accounts is that it lets you ‘hide.’ It provides you a sheath. This can be both good and bad, but when it comes to entering the professional world, which many upperclassmen are about to experience, you shouldn’t have to hide behind the computer.

Social Media apps

The hard truth is this: employers WILL not only Google you, but they will search you on Facebook, Twitter, your personal blog if you have one, and of course, LinkedIn. You do not want a potential employer to see a negative tweet and exile you from the list of promising candidates. Here are five short and sweet tips for what not to do on social media:

Don’t Bash Anyone

This includes former coworkers and supervisors and current coworkers and supervisors. I know it can be tempting to post something about how the person who beat you for the big promotion sounds like a hyena when she laughs, but keep it to yourself or tell a close friend (someone who isn’t your coworker, preferably).

Why not try talking to that person directly about what made you upset? It will show maturity and professionalism, whereas bad-mouthing someone on social media will make you seem immature and ignorant. Also, what’s worse than being called into your supervisor’s office because you tweeted about how your supervisor is just terrible at running meetings? You might get fired, so there’s that.

Don’t Use Expletives

This one should be common sense, right? Wrong. So many people my age swear to their heart’s content on Twitter and Facebook. It’s tasteless, unclassy, and extremely unprofessional. Also, keep slang terms and terms you’ve found on Urban Dictionary down to a bare, BARE minimum (I’m looking at you, YOLO).

I understand that the occasional swear word can help in some extreme cases, but keep it to a minimum. Unless you plan on being a comedian. And if you are, good luck with that.

Don’t Post Inappropriate Pictures

This one should also be common sense, but I see this on Facebook way more often than I’d like to. I understand that many college students want to celebrate their 21st birthday, graduation, and St Patrick’s Day and Homecoming. I get it – I’m a college student, too! Take as many pictures as you’d like – but make sure that the worst ones don’t end up on Facebook. Employers may interpret your constant party pictures as wildly inappropriate and something that wouldn’t fit in to their office culture.

Not sure about which photos to keep and which to delete? Check out this article – 12 Facebook Photos You Should Delete Now

Don’t Pick Fights

We’ve all seen them – the infamous Facebook arguments. Someone posts about a controversial topic, someone else comments about it, more people comment, and all hell breaks loose. While these are undoubtedly hilarious, they’re also embarrassing if you’re caught in the middle of one. Facebook is not the place to have an argument, especially one about politics or religion. I know it’s hard to resist, but your professionalism depends on it!

Don’t Post Without Proofreading

While having a post with a few typos isn’t as bad as having a post filled with swear words and inappropriate pictures, it’s still a bad thing. Potential employers will see your text speak and wonder if you ever went to college. You do not want potential employers to wonder about that sort of thing! So, just like you would with any document, essay, article, or e-mail, proofread your work before you hit ‘send.’

One way to let your feelings out is to write on the computer what you’re mad about. You can even go so far as enter it into the Facebook post box or Twitter tweet box, but before you hit ‘send,’ delete it. Getting your feelings out can make you feel a hundred times better.

I’m not saying that you should not have a personality when you tweet – because by all means, tweet to your heart’s content! But be smart about what you post. Your social media presence should be squeaky clean, especially for those of you entering the workforce!

This post was very negative, but next week’s post will be all positive! It will be all about how to post things of substance, how to connect with potential employers, and how to have a positive experience on social media.

Photo by Jason Howie.

Friday Favorites

For the last Friday Favorites of the school year, I’ve rounded up five of my favorite events that Heather and I put on while we were the social media interns for the 2012-13 school year. Enjoy!

The first big event that Heather and I worked at was the Hawk Career Fair in September of 2012. I was live tweeting and Heather was taking pictures of students and employers. To see more pictures, visit our Facebook page.

Career Fair 1

Heather and I hosted a Halloween Table at Esker and the UC with a custom-made Face-In-Hole! It was a huge hit and Heather snapped a lot of photos of friends pretending to be Frankenstein and Mrs. Frankenstein.

Halloween Table 1

Heather and I hit it off right away. I’m so lucky to have had such an awesome coworker. We bonded over many things, but the one thing we really had in common was our love for social media. We went on a little photoshoot down by the lakefront last semester and got some great pictures!

C&LD Intern Shoot

Heather and I did a lot of tabling during different times during the school year. It was really important for us to get out name out and to represent Career & Leadership Development in a positive light, so many of our tables included free goodies and chances to win padfolios.

Tabling

Valentines Day Table

Tabling 2

The last big event Heather and I worked at was Make a Difference Day. I live tweeting and Heather took pictures during this event.

MADD WW 1

I know I can speak for Heather and say that we’ve had an amazing and successful school year. This internship was a dream come true for both of us and we gained so much experience and knowledge. I hope you’ve enjoyed the posts on this blog. Be sure to check it out next year for even more great blogs posts!

Photos by UWW Career.

Kelsey’s Internship Wrap-Up

As I look back on this social media internship, I can’t help but think about when I interviewed for this position. I was studying abroad in Ireland in the spring of 2012 when I received an e-mail about the social media position. I utilized social media to its fullest extent when I was abroad. I didn’t have a cell phone, so using social media and blogging was one of the only ways I could keep in contact with my friends and family back home in the states. I wanted to get better at using social media, too, so this internship was a dream come true. I managed a blog that semester when I was studying abroad, called The Book of Kels. I knew I wasn’t a fantastic writer by any means, but I definitely wanted to get better at blogging.

Kelsey Welke

The afternoon that I had my Skype interview with Laura Jacobs, I was so nervous! I even posted notes around my computer screen so I could reference them. Thankfully my Skype interview went smoother than expected, and a few days later, when I was traveling in Poland for the weekend, I received the congrats! e-mail. Little did I know, that spur of the moment decision to apply for a social media internship did me wonders and changed my life for the better.

I always thought that I wanted to travel abroad, to take pictures and write for a magazine, to basically live the dream life. I spent this whole year using Hootsuite and blogging like a madman and I can safely say that being an international reporter isn’t my dream any more. Being a social media specialist is my dream (I know, how dorky does that sound?!).

I know I can speak for Heather and say that her and I had a really great year. We hosted tables in the UC, had fun contests, attended diversity events, and made friendships with other Career & Leadership Development interns. I really enjoyed live tweeting during the Hawk Career Fair in September and during Make a Difference Day.

UWW Career 1

This internship was a dream come true. I now know what I want to do after I graduate, and I have Career & Leadership Development to thank for that.

I will be the career social media intern for the 2013-14 school year, but next year I will be focusing on blogging, so be sure to check out the Career Spotlight Blog for some great posts! I’m ecstatic that I will have this internship again next year and I can’t wait to see what great things will come from it.

UWW Career 2

 Photos by UWW Career.