Searching for Jobs

Looking for jobs is sometimes the most difficult part of the job process. Where do you start? What sites are the best? Are there different websites I should use depending on my major? These are all questions that come to mind when starting my search for a job.

There are hundreds of different websites out there that post jobs. How do you know which one is going to give you the best results and help you find the job in the quickest, simplest way?

Here at UW-Whitewater, we have a great resource to help us find jobs. HawkJobs is a great website for current students and alumni to find jobs and internships. You can filter through positions by inputting your major, desired job location, and what type of job you’re looking for. From there it tells you exactly how you apply for that job.

Hawkjobs is a great resource to help you start your search for a job. However, HawkJobs only has postings from the employers who know about HawkJobs. This sometimes leaves out a few popular areas of study.

If you are a person who is interested in a career in advertising, communications, graphic design, marketing, public relations, social media, or web design, BigShoesNetwork.com is a great place to search for jobs. There are two different regions that Big Shoes Network offers postings in, the Midwest and the South.

Once you choose which region you would like to work in, you go to the find a job tab. This page allows you to choose what region you would like to work in and the type of position that you are interested in. Once you see a position that catches your eye, you can simply click on it and it tells you exactly how to apply.

On the other hand, if you are looking for a job with the government, USAjobs.gov is the place that you want to go. Here you can search for all different types of positions with the government. You can narrow your search down by the location you want to be in, the type of position you would like to have, and even the government agency that you would like to work for.

If your dream job is working for your favorite sports team, then you should go to teamworkonline.com. On this website you can search for jobs by the team that you would like to work for. They have all different types of positions, from ticket sales to marketing. You can even narrow your search down to entry-level positions.


Finally, if you are someone who is in the social services field, socialservice.com is a great website for you. This website offers a variety of positions in the social services field from child care workers to case managers. You can narrow your search by what type of degree is required and by location.


When choosing which site is going to be best for you, make sure that you consider what field you want to go in. While you may still be unsure, it always helps to narrow down your options even a little bit.

Keep in mind that this job search process is one that is going to take a lot of time. There are a lot of open positions out there and you want to make sure that you are applying for the ones that you want.

Remember that employers don’t always post all of their jobs online. It is still very important to build up a network of contacts that you can talk to about possible job openings. Networking in person is just as important as networking online.

HawkJobs, Big Shoes Network, USAjobs, teamworkonline, and socialservices.com are all great sites for you to start your job search. They are easy to use and each one provides something unique in your search for a job.

Gaining Experience for the Job Search

Here’s a scenario: You just graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. You walk into your first job interview and up to this point, you’ve done everything right. You’re dressed professionally, followed up before the interview and have everything you need for the interviewer.

You sit down and the employer looks you in the eye and asks, “What kind of experience can you bring to this position and company/organization?”

How are you going to answer this question? 

Acquiring experience for your resume and speaking about it in interviews is crucial to landing the job you want.

While gaining this experience proves to be difficult in certain circumstance, UW-Whitewater offers various opportunities to fill your resume with valuable skills.

Not every job seeker is given the chance to intern in a professional environment, so it is crucial for students to be aware of the resources and possible employment opportunities available to be successful in the job search.

The Student Involvement Office in the James R. Connor University Center helps students find campus jobs, clubs and organizations to join and volunteer opportunities on campus and within the region.

From interning for departments on campus to working in student-ran offices, the Student Involvement Office will help any student find their place to develop professional skills on campus.

Another resource for finding internship or employment opportunities on campus is through the Career Counselors that work in Career & Leadership Development.

These professionals are dedicated to helping students find ways to fill their resume with content that will impress any employer. Appointments with one of the Career Counselors can be made by calling (262) 472-5539.

While interning on campus is one of the easiest ways to gain experience for your resume, not everyone is exactly interested in working in an office.

Just ask Ron Swanson.

Participating in community service opportunities is another great way to fill your resume with meaningful experiences.

From joining a service organization to participating in events like Make -A-Difference Day, gaining volunteer and community service experience is a great strategy in gaining content for your resume.

More information on community service opportunities can be found here.

Now that you have a better idea of what to put on your resume, you’ll be able to answer the question posed by the employer.

You’ll be more confident about your chances of getting hired. You’ll be able to talk about all of the great things you’ve accomplished during your time at UW-Whitewater. Finally, you’ll be successful in finding your dream job.

Tick Tok: 3 Loose Ends that Need Tying

 

Tik tok, on the clock
But graduation countdown don’t stop
Tonight, I‘mma apply
For the job of a lifetime 

Tik tok, on the clock
But second semester won’t stop
Tonight, I’mma scrape by
Til I reach the finish line

Yes, that was my very own career parody of KE$HA’s “Tik Tok,” please hold your applause. While I hope you found it funny, upcoming graduation is no laughing matter. In just a few short weeks, all of you grads will be walking across that glorious stage and receiving those hard-earned diplomas. But don’t get a severe case of senioritis just yet, because there are A LOT of things you need to get done before that big day (and I’m not talking coursework). Here are the top 3.

1. Job Search

Please, please, please don’t wait until the day after graduation to start looking for your first job. The time is now –  actually it was a month ago, but better late than later. Many people think that they don’t need to look for a job until they are actually available to work, but this is not the case. The hiring process is a long one and it takes a lot of time to find a job, get an interview, negotiate, and get hired.

2. Networking

Now is the time to reach out to your contacts. Let them know you are graduating in a month, and that you’re looking for a job. Connecting with them now is good because they can give you leads on jobs that may not be publically posted. People remember what it was like to be a wide-eyed college grad, and they want to help you! So don’t let your pride get in the way and let them.

3. Letters of Recommendation

A lot of job applications ask for a list of people they can contact for recommendations in addition to actual letters. This is the time to ask your professors and supervisors for those ever-coveted letters. By asking 6 weeks before graduation you give them plenty of time to put a lot of effort into it. You’re also half way through the semester, so they should be pretty familiar with your work ethic, strengths, and capabilities.

 

Best of luck to you wide-eyed hopefuls!

 

To-do List: Acrostic Poem Style

Remember acrostic poems from elementary school? You usually had to make a poem describing yourself using the letters of your first name, tell me I’m not alone here! Regardless, hardly anything makes me more nostalgic than thinking about those wondrous Spring Break vacations my family and I went on throughout my childhood, and thus comes my inspiration for this post! While our younger selves had no responsibility, and certainly no job hunting to be done, us older folk must use this time off school wisely for career gain! Without further ado, here’s a Spring Break to-do list acrostic poem style for us older, more career-focused individuals.

Scrub your resume

Spring cleaning friends! There’s no better time to scrub and polish your resume than when you have a week long break from academics. Update it with career relevant coursework, experiences, and work you’ve completed through the winter. Make sure your resume has only relevant information; for example, it may be time to get rid of your “lifeguard for three summers” bullet point to make room for more relevant jobs/responsibilities.

Prioritize

Spring break means you can do anything! Sleep til noon, binge watch a Netflix series, or explore a new city. While all of the aforementioned activities are super fun, they aren’t very productive; especially in regards to your job search. Instead of sleeping til noon, prioritize your responsibilities and take this free time to put a real dent in your career search. Research companies, make connections, and improve your LinkedIn profile.

Regulate your social outlets

When I say regulate, I mean control. And when I’m talking about control, I’m talking about your social media. Spring Break isn’t known for its….ermm… classiness. Make sure you aren’t posting statuses/pictures/comments on your social media platforms that you wouldn’t want a recruiter to see.

Informational Interview

Spring break gives you a lot of free time! Yay! Use this free time to connect with people in your network, and ask for an informational interview. Check out how to score and informational interview from here.

*disclaimer: the article suggests you ask your contact to meet you for coffee and chat about the job, but recruiters have told me they prefer candidates let the employee choose whatever is easiest for them (e.g. coffee vs. e-mail vs. phone conversation).

Network

Spring Break means being social right?! So while you’re out having a good time, and acting classy make some quality contacts! You never know who you might meet, so make sure you carry some business cards with you at all times. You can get inexpensive business cards from vista print.

Go get ‘em

Now go get ‘em you rockstar, you! You’ve done your homework, made connections, and beefed up your resume, now’s the time to start applying and interviewing for that amazing job/internship.

 

How to Jump-Start Your Internship Search

Job search

The time has come to begin thinking about your summer internship. Yes, I know it’s only December, but some summer internship applications are already closed!

When I started my internship search last year, I had no idea where to begin; I had no industry experience, no connections, and no idea what to do. But I did have ambition, drive, and a good internet connection. Here are 3 ways to jump-start your internship search.

1. Reflect

The first step is to take some time and really reflect on your professional goals. Take a minute to consider the different career paths you could pursue, and where you would be happiest. For any major, there are a number of different careers to choose from, so make sure you know what you want to do.

2. Research

Once you have an idea of what kind of position you’re interested in, it’s time to research it. Learn everything you possibly can about the industry: Where are the best companies in that industry located? What is the job like? What is the industry culture like? Do they have a hiring season? These are all important questions to ask yourself. Nearly every company has a website. Use it to your advantage to learn everything about the specific companies your interested in working for. Also, check the company’s website for job openings; if there aren’t any posted don’t hesitate to contact their office to ask if they have an internship program.

Not only should you research the industry and the companies, you can also research the job market. Sites like InternMatch (that’s how I found my internship), Intern Sushi, and indeed are great internship search engines.

3. Reach Out

After you’ve found some perspective internships to apply for, reach out to people that work there. If you don’t already have connections to the industry LinkedIn is a great tool for finding people that work for a specific company. As awkward as it may seem to reach out to a complete stranger, it’s totally worth it. But don’t reach out asking for a job or an interview, when you connect with someone make the conversation about them. Fore example: ask them what they do on a daily basis, what they like about the job, or how they got to where they are.

 

 

Photo Credit: Kate Hiscock

How To Navigate Hawk Jobs

Hawk Jobs is a great resource to use to look for jobs, but unfortunately most students and alumni don’t know how to work it efficiently. That’s what this post is for – to help you navigate Hawk Jobs. Take these steps into consideration and you’ll be able to upload your resume, find job openings, and check out which employees will be at an upcoming career fair in no time.

1. Go to the Hawk Jobs login page.

2. Click “Student Login” and enter your Net-ID and password (your Net-ID is the one you use when you login to your e-mail).

First, before anything, fill out your profile. You can click on the My Account tab on the left side of the screen and then click on My Profile. You’ll need to fill out things such as your major, where you live, and when you’re expected to graduate. You can also fill out your GPA, any skills you have, and your achievements.

If you want to upload your resume, click on the My Account tab and then My Documents. Then scroll down to the Employee Related Categories bar and click Add next to resumes.

If you’re looking for a job, complete the next few steps:

3. Hover your mouse over the Job Search tab and click Job Search.

 

4. Click the drop down arrow in the Job Category bar and choose which category you’re majoring in or what you’re interested in.

5. Then, click the drop down arrow in the Position Type bar and choose between four position types: Degree-Required Opportunities, Internships, Off-Campus Jobs or On-Campus Jobs (the two that I use the most are Degree-Required Opportunities and Internships).

If you have any additional questions on how to use Hawk Jobs, please don’t hesitate to contact our office.