Intern of the Month: Becky Wintringer

Written by Stephanie Gordon

Coming to the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Becky Wintringer was not sure this was the place for her. It was not until she became involved with her residence hall that she was sure Whitewater was home.

Throughout her time at UW-Whitewater, Wintringer was involved in many aspects of student life. From being a general member of the Optimist Club her freshman year, to being a part of the Homecoming Steering Committee last fall, it seems that she has done it all.

Wintringer, an English literature major with minors in journalism and communication, was named the April Intern of the Month for her internship with Career & Leadership Development (C&LD).

Wintringer was hired as a Warhawk Connection Center Intern for the fall of 2013. However, this was not the path she thought she would take.

Originally applying to be a customer service associate, Wintringer found herself with the offer to be an intern in the Warhawk Connection Center. In looking at this opportunity, she felt that it was an area that she did not have a lot of experience in, however, was one that she could grow and develop from.

Throughout her time in the Warhawk Connection Center, Wintringer has appreciated all of the people that she has met and worked with.

“I have absolutely loved my time in the Warhawk Connection Center,” Wintringer stated. “I have been mentored and advised by wonderful professionals throughout my time here who have really helped me develop into the open-minded and professional that I am today. My skills have been fine-tuned in so many ways.”

Wintringer’s time in C&LD will follow her through her next endeavor. After graduation, Wintringer is going to be moving to Massachusetts to pursue her master’s degree in higher education administration and working in their housing department as a first year resident educator at the University of Massachusetts – Lowell.

After learning and growing here at UW-Whitewater, she is excited to see where this new journey takes her and what new experiences she will have and the lessons she will learn.

Take advantage of the opportunities around you and keep an open mind,” Wintringer noted. “You never know when you’re going to find your passion.”

Passion Drives Motivation: Kate Winkler Named March Intern of the Month

Kate Winkler knew there was something missing from her marketing major when she entered the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.

It was not until the second semester of her freshman year when she was enrolled in Biology 120, that she discovered what she wanted to study for the duration of her undergraduate collegiate career.

“I’ve always been proficient in science and wanted to take more science courses after that semester,” Winkler said. “After speaking with my adviser, I switched majors and began the path that has brought me to where I am now.”

Winkler, a senior integrated science and business major from Kewaskum, Wis., was awarded the Intern of the Month honor for the month of March. Her marketing internship started in July of 2014 at Spacesaver Corporation.

Spacesaver is an innovator in storage, offering solutions to make every aspect of a business run more efficiently.

A former supervisor from her time as a market researcher for the Wisconsin Innovation Service Center (WISC) contacted Winkler about the internship at Spacesaver.

“While I only completed one project under her direction, she thought that my constant drive for knowledge and diligent work ethic would be a great fit at the company,” Winkler said. “After doing my research on the corporation, I too, knew it would be a great fit for me.”

During her time at Spacesaver, Winkler has created market briefs about different industries, conducted online surveys and phone interviews to gauge the preferences of their audience and collaborated with the marketing team to develop user-friendly product pages.

Winkler is also working to improve Spacesaver’s social media strategy and search engine optimization strategy. This includes working with social media outlets to increase audience engagement and research key words to incorporate into the company’s content.

“What intrigued me about the position at Spacesaver was the fact that I would be able to constantly collaborate with the whole marketing team,” Winkler said. “Most of my market research projects that I had completed at WISC were very individually driven projects and while I can work efficiently on my own, I think that the best work comes out of a team effort.”

Another big part of Winkler’s internship is communicating with several different people, in order to work more efficiently and know the product better.

This has proven to be initially difficult, but has produced substantial benefits, Winkler notes.

“What I had thought were strengths before are even stronger strengths now because the marketing team at Spacesaver has pushed my boundaries,” Winkler said. “Spacesaver has taught me that a job can be fun, yet scary. I have learned that it is okay to take a risk and fail, just as long as you learn and grow from it.

Outside of work experience, Winkler is currently the captain of the UW-Whitewater Women’s Golf Team and has been a member for the past four years.

Golf is individual and team-based at the same time and truly showcases an individual’s work ethic, according to Winkler.

“I came to UW-Whitewater to play golf, but I have found so much more than that,” Winkler said. “I think UW-Whitewater does a tremendous job at giving students all that they need to succeed and pushing students to be their ultimate best, both in the classroom and outside.”

After graduation, Winkler wants to continue working in marketing for a water business. Until then, she will continue to learn and grow as a working professional.

“Take advantage of all opportunities and soak it all in,” Winkler said. “Learn as much as you can and apply it. Push past what you know and try something new. Collaborate and share your ideas. But most of all take advantage of these opportunities and absorb as much as you can while the chance is in your hands.”

 Apply to be our next Intern of the Month and share your story! 

C&LD Internships: A Day in the Life

In present day, it seems like every entry level position out of college wants to see some sort of experience. This experience is usually gained through an internship. While the internship search can be daunting and challenging, there is a department on campus that offers great internships. As current interns for Career & Leadership Development, we spoke to other interns in the office to see how working here has not only given them job experience, but so much more.

We started in the SEAL office, where we talked to a few interns about what it is like being a part of SEAL and C&LD:

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“I love being an intern because of how connected we all are yet our jobs are all different. I also like working in such a busy atmosphere.”

-Shawn Giese, SEAL Homecoming Chair 

“I have really enjoyed my internship position with Career & Leadership Development. It has helped me grow as an individual and has really shaped the person I am today. The endless amount of opportunities and experiences that I have gained throughout this internship has helped me further my education and career path here at UW-Whitewater.”

-Kayhla Sadowski, SEAL Social Media Intern

“My time in Career & Leadership Development (C&LD) has changed my life. I know that sounds cliché, but I have a family in C&LD on the SEAL team. While I have only worked here this year, I have learned so much about entertainment, marketing, and students on campus. Working as the Large Event Intern has been one of the best decisions of my life, and I hope to learn more and grow as a student while on campus for the next two years.”

-Jessica Faust, SEAL Large Event Intern

After talking to those SEALS, we decided to go over to the PB Poorman Pride Center to see what the PRIDE Interns had to say: 

“The past 2 years being a PRIDE Intern in Career & Leadership Development have been so crucial to who I am as a leader. Every opportunity I’ve had has shaped me in ways that will not only help me in my career, but throughout the rest of my life.”

-Alyssa Reetz, PRIDE Intern

“Working as an intern in C&LD has helped me value myself and develop a professional identity.”

-Lisa Helms, PRIDE Intern

“C&LD has adopted me into their family!”

-Connell Patterson, PRIDE Intern

The next stop on our journey through C&LD brought us to the Student Involvement Office, where we talked to Hope Schmidt, the Community Service Intern:

“The confidence I have gained as a C&LD intern has been tremendous. Things I never thought I could do…I can now say I do.  Because of this internship opportunity, I feel like a better-rounded individual. I have learned skills that I can now take with me wherever I go after I leave UW-W!”

After all this traveling, we ended up back in our office that we share with Jamie Hinze, the Human Resources Intern and she gave us some insight into her experience in the department:

“During my first year with Career & Leadership Development, I was employed as a Customer Service Associate working at the front desk. This was a fun and flexible position that taught me how to provide exceptional customer service and significantly strengthened my interpersonal communication and problem solving skills. Later, I earned the title of Human Resources Intern – a new position in the department in which I assist in the coordination of departmental student employee experience, specifically in selection, professional development, and evaluation. This internship has allowed me to explore my interests and career goals while giving me the opportunity to network with employers, students, and UW-Whitewater staff. My supervisors are incredibly supportive of my goals and needs as a full-time student and they have tailored the experience to fit me.”

As you can see, there are many different facets of C&LD and each offers a different experience. Whether you are looking to be a social media guru, coordinate community service events, or just learn something new about UW-Whitewater and what it offers to students, C&LD is a great place to gain all these experiences and many more.

The applications are open until March 3rd! If you are looking for an internship and want to be a part of the C&LD family, then go to uww.edu/cld and apply today!

Taking the Risk

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In high school, if you had asked me to point out Whitewater, Wisconsin on a map, I would have had no idea where to look. I was just a girl from the North suburbs of Chicago looking for a great place to go to college. I would have never guessed that I would end up in the small town of Whitewater at this University.

Making this decision was not easy. I knew that Whitewater had a great business school, there were not too many students, and it wasn’t too far from home. However, being from the North suburbs of Chicago, there were not a lot of people who came here for school. I would most likely be the only person from my high school coming here, a scary thought to any freshman.

With that in mind, I decided to take the risk and attend this University. My random roommate ended up being from another North suburb that was just around 15 minutes from mine. We were both in the same boat. We knew that if we wanted to get the most out of our college experience we would have to get involved.

This brought us to sorority information nights. We went through recruitment and joined Delta Zeta. As a new freshman, I would have never thought that joining that organization would bring me to where I am today. My sorority sisters never failed to encourage me to take risks, like the one I had taken when I chose to attend Whitewater.

My junior year, I was elected as a co-recruitment chair for the Panhellenic Council, the governing body for sororities. I had no idea what I was getting myself into. Through this role I had the opportunity to attend the Association of Fraternal Values and Leadership conference in Indianapolis last winter. This conference gave me great insight into what it means to be a leader and how being Greek can help that.

Shortly after returning from the conference I decided to take another risk and apply to be on the Homecoming Steering Committee, something I quickly realized was nothing like I thought it was going to be. As the first semester of my senior year was coming to a close, I quickly realized that all these leadership positions that I had held were ending. I knew that I wanted to spend my last semester on campus giving back to something that had given me so many opportunities and helped me grow from the scared, lonely freshman I was to the confident senior that I am now. So I took my final risk and accepted this position as a Social Media Intern.

I am excited to spend my last semester here representing Career and Leadership by writing for this blog and posting from our various social media pages. I will be providing a student perspective on the scary process of searching for, applying to, interviewing for, and accepting jobs and internships.

Big Buildings to Open Roads: Jonathan Fera’s Journey to Happiness at UW-Whitewater

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Being born and raised in a big city, I became naïve of what was outside the Milwaukee city limits. The city was so fast and so vast that any other area seemed unexciting in comparison. That mindset did not last past the age of eighteen.

I decided to come to the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater during my senior year of high school. My advisers informed me of the College of Business and Economics at this institution and it’s positive reputation, so it seemed like the perfect fit. That career path only lasted two days into my time at UW-Whitewater until I switched to a communications major with an emphasis in public relations.

During the fall semester of my freshmen year, a strong depression caused by missing home and wanting to be around my family took over my life. I was socializing with people in my residence hall and in my classes, but it was never enough to be happy.

The city was calling my name to come home. After all, I missed the quick pace environment and diverse culture.

How was I going to spend the next three and a half years here? It was not until I opened my eyes to the amazing opportunities at UW-Whitewater that this attitude changed.

After talking to my Resident Assistant, she mentioned attending the spring involvement fair to look for student organizations to join. I had an interest in political communications after dropping the business major, so I joined the UW-Whitewater College Democrats.

I immediately got involved with the organization and started to make friends outside of my residence hall and classes. It was refreshing to have conversations with like-minded individuals that were passionate about the same things I was.

During my sophomore year, I joined the organization’s executive board as their Communications Director and the next year, was elected President.

Besides the College Democrats, I found the Whitewater Student Government (WSG) and the University Marketing and Media Relations Department.

I started attending Whitewater Common Council meetings because of my role as Intergovernmental Affairs Director for WSG. This allowed me to become more engaged in the community and be able to call Whitewater a new home.

It all happened so fast and I was so overwhelmed by my professional involvement that I began to lose sight of why I got involved in the first place: to be happy.

I was asked to join the Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity my junior year from some WSG colleagues. I did not think I was the kind of person to join a Greek organization.

When looking back at that decision, I wouldn’t take it back for the world.

This past semester, I assisted in coordinating the grassroots efforts of the WarhawksVote campaign for the gubernatorial election. This allowed me to have a say in promotional material, strategic messaging and online content through both WSG and University Marketing and Media Relations.

After the election was over, I wanted a new opportunity. I wanted a new project before entering the workforce. After all, this is the last semester to make the most out of what became the best four years of my life.

Fast-forwarding to present day, I am now the Career Social Media Intern for UW-Whitewater Career and Leadership Development. While WSG is a part of the Warhawk Connection Center, I have never worked for the department before.

I am excited by this new opportunity and exciting challenge to better myself and my craft, while helping others gain the skills, motivation and resources to find a job or student organization to join.

After the journey I had to pursue in finding my place at UW-Whitewater, I hope to make that process easier and less stressful for other students.

Career and Leadership Development has the resources and guidance to help students find their place at this institution. To motivate them to succeed and take chances. To help them be happy.

The Road to Productivity: Exploring How Warhawks Persevere and Prevail

“There will be obstacles. There will be doubters. There will be mistakes, but with hard work there are no limits!” –Anonymous 

It’s that time of the year again when workloads outweigh energy levels! Winter is quickly approaching and finals are right around the corner for us Warhawks. During this time of year it’s easy to become stressed out, burnt out, or just down right depressed from the amount of work you have to complete.  So in an effort to alleviate some of that stress, here’s what a few fellow Warhawks from Career and Leadership Development had to say about how they stay productive during late semester chaos:

Lisa Helms: PRIDE Intern

“With school it is a little harder for me to stay focused but I usually pull things together at the last minute. However with work, I stay focused by making to do lists when I get into the office. I start by checking my email to see if there’s someone that I need to communicate with right away and I just take it one step at a time.”

Cherish Golden: PRIDE Intern

“ I usually go to the library and sit at a table in a quite area to stay focused on academics. I don’t get on the computers because then I’d be distracted.  At work, when I’m all out of tasks, I just find little stuff to do to stay busy. Even if it’s just fixing the chairs, I have to stay busy and remain on my feet in order to be productive. “

Radaya Ellis: Biology Major

“Well I have a productive playlist that I listen to when its grind time to get me back focused. Artist on my productive play list include artist such as Lil Boosie, to help motivate me, and Kirk Franklin, to uplift me. Listening to artist along those parameters helps keep me motivated both in work and at school. “

Katie Barbour: Involvement Office Graduate Assistant

 “A lot of times around the end of the semester I have a lot of big projects to do. So for me this semester I have two large group papers, as well as projects in two different classes. So at this point, it’s really a matter of working effectively with my group members and trying to be a leader within those two groups to make sure we get things done. Especially since finals are right before graduation and that’s when those things are due, and frankly I don’t want to be overwhelmed with group projects that late in the semester. So I think just being proactive and making sure you get things done ahead of time really helps relieve some of the stress”

Becky Wintringer: Warhawk Connection Center Intern

Becky Wintringer

“To-Do Lists are a big thing for me. I have post-its and color coded notes and stuff all over the place. I use my calendar to color code everything! Blue things are for class, green things are for work, and purple things are for organizations. I just try to stay managed by plotting out certain times of the day for individual things so that I’m not just doing all homework for three hours but individual tasks during individual times.

Anthony Richardson: Seal Entertainment Intern

Anthony Richardson

“In order to stay productive I pretty much just remind myself of why I’m here and I use that as motivation to assure that I persevere throughout the rest of the semester.”

We hope these tips can help you achieve your fullest potential and maximize your productivity during stressful times. Be sure to finish up this semester strong and don’t be afraid to join the dialog. What are some strategies that you live by to manage  stressful times and remain productive? Comment and share your ideas.

The Birth of a Student Leader: DeJuan Washington’s Journey

As I began my first semester as a first generation freshman here at the University of Wisconsin- Whitewater, I was plagued with various insecurities that forced me to question my value in higher education. Like many African American students at this institution, I struggled academically and saw little progress in my quest to mirror the academic performance of the majority population. I was lost. In search of guidance to aid me in my journey of academic excellence, I attended my first Black Student Union (BSU) meeting, a place where I would soon feel at home and culturally validated in an environment that was completely new for me.

As time progressed and I entered my second semester of my freshmen year, BSU became a place of common ground for me. I was able to connect with students who looked like me, thought like me, and more importantly we shared the same lived experience. It was almost as if we were a subculture within a larger culture that we had yet learned to conquer. The beauty of this experience was that even though we felt the clear division of cultures, we still managed to thrive and coexist with our majority peers.

It was during one of the weekly BSU meetings that a guest speaker, who I later learned was the Director of Career and Leadership Development (CLD) named Ron Buchholz, came in to speak about possible internship opportunities and the importance of getting involved on campus. Being the academically challenged freshmen that I was, I immediately skimmed over the information in the flier in search of the GPA requirement, and of course I didn’t meet the criteria. I did however skim over a position at the LGBT resource center that I knew would be great for me once I achieved the GPA requirement, so all hope wasn’t lost.

Following that meeting, I worked tirelessly to boost my GPA, spending long nights in the library, exchanging my thirsty Thursdays for study Thursdays, attending office hours and most importantly asking for help when needed. For the first time in my short lived colligate career, I felt like an actual college student. I taught myself how to properly prepare for exams, how to keep track of my progress in classes, and how to manage my time wisely. These self-acquired skills taught me to believe in myself and my capabilities. I also started to realize that although grades mattered, they didn’t define a person’s success. This realization gave me the motivation that I needed to apply for my first internship within Career and Leadership Development in spite of the many barriers that haunted me.

After completing the application and receiving a call back for an interview, I still had a tiny amount of doubt in my mind that I could obtain this position without meeting the criteria. As I walked into a tiny office to be interviewed, I encountered a warm greeting from a woman I’d later grow to love as Jan Bilgen. I immediately liberated myself of all anxiety, as she made me feel comfortable in her presence and I began to bare my soul as if my life (and bank account) depended on it. In what felt like only a few seconds, 30 minutes of conversation had passed before she informed me on the next steps to take if I were offered the position 2 weeks from then and we said our goodbye’s.

Two weeks later, as I sat in the basement computer lab of Benson hall typing away at my final English paper for the semester, my phone rings. At this point I figured it was a telemarketer as I’d forgotten all about the internship and quite frankly didn’t think I would get it.  When I answered the phone, I was greeted be the same welcoming voice I’d encountered two weeks prior, only this time she spoke with a level of suspense as if there was a purpose for her call. During the entire phone call, which lasted for all of 3 minutes, I still wasn’t able to convince myself that there was great news on the other side of the conversation. However, it was to my surprise that Jan Bilgen offered me the position as the new PRIDE intern for the PB Poorman Pride Resource Center located in Career and Leadership Development.

Obtaining a position in this office was critical to my development as a student leader for two reasons. For one, it thought me to always take a step out of faith, no matter if I couldn’t see what lies ahead. Secondly, it taught me to always believe that the impossible is in fact possible. If I had never believed in my capabilities, I would’ve never recognized my fullest potential; and if I’d considered my goal as impossible, I would’ve never made it to my current reality. These two things are vital to the success of student leaders, and this is why I’ll always be thankful for my internship experience with Career and Leadership Development.

After two years as a PRIDE intern and serving in various other leaderhip roles (Peer mentor, VP of BSU, McNair Scholar, ect.) , I’ve decided to take yet another step out on faith by accepting the position as the new Social Media Manager for Career and Leadership Development. While social media isn’t at all new to me, my lists of responsibilities are. In this position I’ll provide a fresh student perspective on topics ranging from career resources provided by CLD, leadership involvement opportunities, diversity and much more. Managing social media accounts such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Pinterest and a blog, I’ll be fully committed to providing the general campus community with an array of essential information. It is my hope that my story has inspired you all to be leaders in your own right in spite of the obstacles and that you keep following me on the new journey I’ve begun.

Interview with WSG President

I had the opportunity to talk to the Whitewater Student Government president, Justin Murphy, about involvement, what he loves about WSG, and his advice for freshman students. Justin is a fifth year senior double majoring in finance and integrated science and business with an emphasis in water resource.

Justin transferred from UW-Platteville when he was a junior, and has been in WSG for three years now. He started off as a senator, then became the business and financial services director on executive board, and he was elected president last spring.

One of his favorite things about being president is getting to know the higher-ups, such as the chancellor and the provost.

‘I got to know the chancellor very well and I’m getting to be pretty good friends with the provost. Their opinion matters a lot as far as WSG goes. We run ideas by the provost and see what her opinion is. Her feedback is invaluable. Being on WSG has definitely helped me learn how to interact with all different kinds of people.’

Justin also does a lot of professional development processes.

‘As president, I got to hire five directors, so we had an application process where I looked at resumes, went to interviews, and chose five people who we work with directly. That was good experience to have, to see the whole hiring process, from start to finish. We have to figure out how to handle situations in a professional way and not lose your head over it.’

Justin Murphy

He strongly encourages students to get involved. He describes himself as a go-getter, and admits to signing up for a dozen orgs at the Involvement Fair when he transferred to UW-Whitewater a few years ago. His favorite organization he’s involved in is WSG, of course.

‘I met a lot of great people through WSG. They are some of my best friends now. We have a great executive board. I couldn’t ask for a better crew.’

If you’re interested in joining WSG, their open meetings are at 7pm every Monday night in UC 259.

Photo by UWW Career.

Interview with SEAL Manager

I had the opportunity to sit down with SEAL manager Sara Molnar, and talk to her about her experience on SEAL, her new-found love for event planning, and how getting involved can help students’ futures! Sara is a fifth year senior, double majoring in history and special education. Last year, Sara was an entertainment intern for SEAL, Student Entertainment Awareness League, and this year she is the manager.

SEAL

‘I actually heard about SEAL when I was a sophomore,’ Sara says.’I was working on event crew, and Melissa Grosso was my boss, so we worked pretty closely with SEAL and we went through the same training program, so that’s when I first really knew what it was.’

Sara really enjoyed what she did with the event crew, but it was solely staffing and working the events, and she wanted to do more. Her being on the event crew helped her make a smooth transition to entertainment intern her first year on SEAL.

‘Melissa [Grosso] actually reached out to me and asked me, ‘Have you ever thought about applying for SEAL?’ and I hadn’t really, so her asking if I’d thought about it got me to think about it. I thought it would be a lot of fun to put on your own events for campus.’

Although she wasn’t interested in getting into the event planning field last year, she can definitely see herself being an event planner in the future, and she has SEAL to thank for that!

‘Being on SEAL has definitely opened up a lot of opportunities for me. Not only has it taught me a lot about a potential new career choice that I want to go into, but it’s also allowed me to really grow professionally. When I was on the entertainment team, we had to reach out to the artists and agents, really got me to learn how to communicate with people, more than I had to in the past. Also I think it really showed me what this campus has to offer and how you can give back to the campus by hosting events for students.’

One of the biggest things Sara has learned from being on SEAL is time management and understanding how strict deadlines are, especially in the event planning field.

‘We [the SEAL interns] would be given four or five events per semester, and the event would be set the semester before, so you couldn’t change the date. You had to have everything done by that date. In the classroom, yes, you have to follow a deadline, but sometimes they can be a little more lenient. When an event is coming and you haven’t done anything for it, it can totally flop. You really need to manage your time and prioritize, which is something that I’m still learning. You need to prioritize, what’s most important, what should I get done when.’

SEAL does not only deal with event planning, though. They focus on marketing, promotions, public relations, social media, and mainly bringing an event up from nothing.

Sara Molnar

Having an internship is great for networking, and connecting with Career & Leadership Staff and interns is extremely beneficial when it’s time to enter the workforce.

‘When you need something so small like a letter of recommendation, and if you don’t have those experiences, you have no one to help you. Networking and being able to get yourself out there and making a name for yourself now makes your future better. Who knows what kind of opportunities they can provide. Having those resources will help you for the future.’

Sara’s last piece of advice? ‘Get involved. It’s really important, especially when you’re younger, because then you have the opportunity to get bigger positions when you get older.’

Are you interested in being on SEAL? They are hiring for the spring semester! Apply here by November 11!

Photos by UWW Career.

Interview with AMA President

I had the opportunity to talk with American Marketing Association’s president, Briana Roy, about leadership, involvement, and, of course, AMA. Briana Roy is a senior, with a corporate health and communications major and marketing minor. She joined AMA her second week of her freshman year and has loved it ever since.

‘Joining AMA was the best decision I’ve ever made,’ Briana says. ‘I love it. I’ve been involved ever since freshman year. I’ve made so many great connections through networking; I’ve grown in ways that I would not have if I wouldn’t have gotten involved.’

There are about 200 students in AMA, and their meetings are every Wednesday night in the Timmerman Auditorium in Hyland Hall at 4pm. They are always open meetings, so everyone is encouraged to attend! Briana says there are 17 positions on AMA executive board, and every position changes each semester.

‘That gives more students the opportunity to get on e-board faster, say if they don’t join AMA until they’re a junior, they can get on board right away. Also you get to hold more positions that way,’ Briana says.

Briana Roy

Contrary to popular belief, you do not need to be a marketing major to join AMA.

‘AMA is very broad,’ Briana says. ‘We have advertising, we have finance, we have IT, accounting. It’s really open to everyone, especially sincemarketing is such a broad field, that’s one reason why we’re so big. If you really like sales, we do sales. If you’re interested in retail, we do retail. If you’re interested in finance, we do finance. Last year we had Photoshop workshops. There’s so many opportunities that you can’t say that you joined AMA and didn’t find something that was for you.’

AMA is also a professional organization, and students at UW-Whitewater connect with their alumni regularly.

‘An AMA alumni talked to us and one of the biggest things she took from AMA was learning how to talk with professionals. In college you get to talk to other students and professors but you don’t really necessarily get to talk with other professionals but when she got into her job she found it really beneficial that she knew how to talk to higher-up management, whereas some people might be more intimidated by that. If you’re in a leadership role you’ll have that experience.’

Briana’s last thoughts about AMA? ‘It really gives you a hands-on opportunity. You’re not going to go into a classroom and do the kinds of things that you can do with AMA. I can go into a job interview and say ‘I managed a team of 33 people’ and you just don’t get that in a classroom.’

Are you interested in joining AMA? Contact Briana Roy at RoyBC19@uww.edu.

Photo by UWW Career.