So You Don’t Have An Internship This Summer?

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The academic year is winding down, summer is approaching and panic sets in.  You don’t have a summer internship yet.  Perhaps you’ve been spending endless hours applying for positions since the fall semester but nothing has worked out.  Or maybe you just started applying for positions last week and the majority of them have been filled.

Stress mounts as self-doubt runs through your mind. “Time is running out.  Without an internship I’ll never land my dream job.”

Wrong. Don’t panic! While you may no longer be able to land your dream internship for now, there are many valuable and productive ways to spend your time this summer.  Here is a game plan to make sure you make this summer count!

1. Network

Whether you’re tapping into your own established network or asking your parents what friends of theirs you can contact, networking is a powerful method to help advance your career. Not sure where to start? Consider reconnecting with former teachers, mentors or even alumni from your high school. See whom they know and who they can introduce you to.  Get out there and attend networking events this summer. It all starts with a conversation, so step out of your comfort zone and create connections with those around you.

2. Volunteer

Whether you’re volunteering at a local food pantry or with a national non-profit organization, there are plenty of ways you can volunteer and prepare yourself for your future career.  Many volunteer positions will give you a proper title that will look just as great as an internship on your resume, and you can list your job duties just as you would for an internship. Nonprofits are always looking for volunteers. Try finding an organization your passions align with and contact them to see how you can help.  Serving as a volunteer could lead you to an internship or even a full time position. 

3. Continue the search

Don’t stop applying.  Consider taking an unpaid internship to gain the experience, if needed.  Use this free time to find the perfect internship for next semester.  Get yourself hired before anyone else even begins working on their resumes. Keep an eye on job openings.  Contact companies and reach out to them before they even get a chance to say they are hiring.  You will be ready for next semester before anyone has a chance to even think about it.  It’s never too late, so don’t lose your drive.

Untitled.png24. Gaining skills from unrelated jobs

Within your summer job ask if you can help out with something that relates to your field of work.  Make sure your unrelated job ties into the overall narrative you’re telling about your skills and experiences.  You can highlight components of your summer job and relate it back to your career goals on your resume.  Some transferrable skills include: working with difficult people, managing time or stress, working with money, and the list goes on and on. Don’t dismiss the experiences that are coming your way.  Even though it is not your ideal internship, you can still learn new things every day at an unrelated job.

Not sure where to begin your search? Click on the different colleges below to for a list of internship coordinators here at UW-Whitewater:

Your resources are closer than you think.

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  1. Revamp your online presence

Take the summer to update your LinkedIn profile, clean up social media accounts, and revamp your resume.  Think about what you have accomplished in the past year; new skills, course, projects or certificates.  By taking the time to update your resume you can focus on the details and specifics to make it as clean as possible while reflecting your personal achievements.  Not only will these updates save you time down the road, but also you will begin to recognize what areas you may need to start focusing on for the future.

  1. Continue your education

Take summer courses.  Use this summer to build up your GPA.  You can lighten up your load for the fall by taking summer classes.  Pick up classes that will help you with something in the long run.  Teach yourself Photoshop or how to code.  Learning new skills that relate to your career field can give you an edge when applying for internships.  Click on the different colleges below to see whom to contact to help you find internships here at Whitewater.

You may not have the perfect internship in place, but you can still gain skills and experience for your resume. Take a moment to sit down and make your game plan to attack the fall semester. Remember, don’t panic!

5 Video Resume Tips Recruiters Want You To Know

In our last blog post, we told you a little bit about the video resume and who should potentially use one if they’re looking for a little something extra they could do to stand out. If you’re thinking that this tactic might increase your chances of getting noticed and you’re interested in learning how to go about making one, here are a few tips to make a successful video resume!

  • Treat it like an interview

Dress professionally, talk professionally, and above all, act professionally. Employers are NOT going to want hire someone that isn’t taking their video seriously. Treat your video resume the same you would treat an interview! Also be sure that you’re filming in a professional and appropriate setting. Sit at a desk or in front of a blank wall/screen. You don’t want your viewers to be distracted with a noise in the background or any clutter around you.

  • Keep it short

You are ENHANCING the resume you already have. Do NOT just simply read off your resume to a camera. Tell your viewers about something that isn’t on your resume, or expand on a point that you may have listed on it. Don’t just tell them what you might of achieved in the past, but what you are capable of achieving in the future (with their company). Aim between a 30 second minimum and 2-minute maximum to avoid excessive and unnecessary information.

  • Be creative

If you are capable of adding in visuals post production, go for it! Show of your skills with your video. As seen in one of the extreme examples mentioned in our previous post, you could be outrageous in your approach or keep it clean and simple; the choice is ultimately up to you and the type of person you want to come across as. A rule of thumb with this is typically: the more creative of a job it is, the more creative you can be with your video.

  • Write a script and PRACTICE

Like you would with most speeches, make an outline of some sort so you know what points you want to cover in your video. More importantly though, be sure that you practice a few times before actually filming it: this will help both with your delivery and the effectiveness of your content.

  • If you don’t have the resources to produce a quality video, DON’T make one.

The last thing that you want to do is submit a video that looks like you recorded it off of a flip-phone (remember those?). If you’re going to make a video, be sure that you are putting in as much effort as you would for a traditional resume or an actual interview. Check out this video just for some reassurance on the fact.

Here’s what some people are saying about them..

Mike Ramer, president of Ramer Search Consultants—a professional recruiting firm specializing in the financial, energy, biomedical, and human resources fields—agrees that video resumes are a useful way for some candidates to demonstrate their professionalism and to help them differentiate from the crowd. According to him, “If I received a video resume, I would review it, and if it’s impressive, it can absolutely help the candidate.”

“These industries are extremely competitive and a video introduction can be the difference in helping you stand out from the competition.” 

 


Below are a few examples of different approaches to the video resume. Career & Leadership Development can offer assistance with both traditional and video resumes. We encourage you to share your video resume with us if you choose to make one!

Video Resume examples:

 

  1. Simple, straightforward


2. Creative, “awkward,” memorable

3. Funny, outrageous, creative

4. Visual

Post-Career Fair Tips

Attending a Career Fair isn’t always enough. You have dropped your resumes and got the business cards. What is there to do now? Just sit and wait for a phone call or an email? There are actually steps to take after attending a Career Fair to ensure you stand out amongst the hundreds of students that attended the event as well. Here is a short list of the most effective ways to get that internship or job opportunity above the crowd:

1. Start Getting Organized

Networking with employers is in many ways a daunting task. Especially when you have just spoken to a handful of employers and recruiters. So the best way to stay ahead is to create a document that organizes what organization or business you spoke to. If you have a business card staple that to the document next to the corresponding name, or simply make note of the recruiter. It will also benefit you to write down anything you might have said that stood out during your encounter. This way you have a conversation starter during follow-ups.

2. Follow-up

If you grabbed a business card or two (which you most definitely should have) remember to give those recruiters a ring. Make sure to stay fresh in their mind and give them a follow-up call. There are really two general routes you can take when planning that conversation. Depending on the relationship you might have with the recruiter, it might be note worthy opportunity to call within 24-48 hours. If it was a recruiter whom you have never met before, realize that these recruiters travel from Career Fair to Career Fair and do not necessarily have the time to chat right away. A rule of thumb is to wait about a week and a half’s worth of time before following up. This is to give them time to sort through resumes and to catch them when they are not focused on recruiting during Career Fair events. Remember, a well-planned follow-up will show dedication and leadership.

3. Update and Professionalize LinkedIn

100% of employers look at LinkedIn; make sure they can find you! That is probably the most important aspect. But a professional account will put you in a different league than the competition. GET A PROFESSIONAL HEADSHOT! If you do not have one already, get one. No cropped pictures allowed and definitely make sure you have a picture of you in your best outfit uploaded. Not having a profile picture is the worst possible scenario on LinkedIn. This cannot be stressed enough! Make sure EVERY question/aspect of the profile is filled out to the best of your ability. This profile is your E-resume and should be treated as such, professional and complete.

4. Continue Practicing

Interviewing well is most certainly a skill. And like any skill when you don’t utilize it, you lose it. It will keep your skills sharp and ready for your next opportunity.

5. Reflect on the Experience

How do you think you did approaching recruiters? Here is a list of questions to ask in reflection on a performance:

• Did I prepare for the Career Fair?
• Did I make enough networks? More than 3?
• Did I give my 30-second elevator speech?
• Did I have any memorable conversations?
• Did I learn anything about a potential employer or myself?
• Would I do anything differently next time?

Hopefully your Career Fair experience was memorable and you gained some new networks. Sometimes the preparation for a Career Fair can be daunting in itself and you have to decide if all that preparation is worth it to find your career. I can tell you it most certainly is. These Post-Career Fair tips are just as essential, maintaining professionalism and taking initiative will put you ahead of the heard. Anything we might have missed? Do you have a follow-up experience to share? Let us know in the comments!

Like, Share and Follow UWW Career on Facebook and Twitter for more helpful hints and tricks on career advice and opportunities!

 

Sources:

7 Things You Need to Do After Attending a Career Fair. Retrieved October 3, 2015.

Focus on Follow-up – nationalcareerfairs.com. (2015, January 30). Retrieved October 4, 2015.

Dress for Success…Without Breaking Your Fragile Bank Account

We’ve all been there. We were even warned that it would happen; that we would eventually face the sad reality that we’re actually living and breathing the stereotype of a broke college student. You’ve probably found yourself heating up your Ramen Noodles in the microwave, while looking for spare change in your couch cushions, just so you can have somewhat of a social life and see the $1 movie playing in the UC.

When it comes down to it, being broke can become a pretty stressful problem you have to deal with.

This stress becomes amplified when you finally get that interview, or attend a job fair, and you realize you’ve yet to begin building your professional wardrobe. How does one make money when one cannot get the job because one does not have the appropriate wardrobe in order to land that job?!


It’s a cycle that adds on to the stress and often discourages students from trying to get the job they really want. That’s why we’re here to tell you to stress no more! Here are some alternatives we’ve found for when it comes to getting that budget-friendly professional wardrobe.

Maybe you have some old dress clothes from your parents, or found a suit at the thrift store. I know it’s not the most ideal option, but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do. Take what you already have and try to modify it so it looks like it was made to fit you. There are some great inexpensive tailors that can get the job done and get you ready for that interview!

Although we would all love to sport the latest Calvin Klein business wear, we know that our bank accounts would probably not cooperate with a purchase that hefty. Try to focus on the basic elements you need (not want). You probably don’t need 10 different dress shirts and 3 pairs of shoes when you’re just starting out. Start with the absolute basics and build up from there once you’ve finally secured a job. Many stores like H&M, J.C. Penny, Kohls and Sears, just to name a few, offer a good variety of professional attire for a reasonable price. Get your basics and only buy what you absolutely need!

One benefit that actually comes from being labeled a broke college student, is that handy student ID card. What most people don’t know is that your ID card can get you lots of discounts! Stores like Charlotte Russe, J. Crew, Banana Republic, and ASOS all offer students discounts, so take advantage of them! (Here’s a list of more discounts that your student card can get you! http://bit.ly/1gsRZct)

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Another option is to go through your closet and get rid of things you no longer wear or need. You can try to sell these items at stores or online and use that money towards your new professional closet! Ebay offers used clothing at reasonable prices and you can sell your old stuff at the same time! You can also search for your area to see if your community offers any local clothing swaps!  Freecycle.org, is a site that aims to encourage people to reuse and recycle their old clothes. You can find your nearest group on their website and start saving your money!

Universities all over also usually offer some resources when it comes to getting your wardrobe ready for professional events or interviews. UW-Whitewater has the “Warhawk Success Closet” that gives all students the chance to get free professional business attire that has been donated to the university. The Warhawk Success Closet will be held on September 24th and 25th from 11am-5pm in the University Center (9/24 UC69 and 9/25 UC264).

Now there’s really no excuse for wearing jeans and sandals to the next career fair. Keep these simple tips in mind and you’ll be dressed for success without enduring the guilt of breaking your bank!

Intern of the Month: Becky Wintringer

Written by Stephanie Gordon

Coming to the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Becky Wintringer was not sure this was the place for her. It was not until she became involved with her residence hall that she was sure Whitewater was home.

Throughout her time at UW-Whitewater, Wintringer was involved in many aspects of student life. From being a general member of the Optimist Club her freshman year, to being a part of the Homecoming Steering Committee last fall, it seems that she has done it all.

Wintringer, an English literature major with minors in journalism and communication, was named the April Intern of the Month for her internship with Career & Leadership Development (C&LD).

Wintringer was hired as a Warhawk Connection Center Intern for the fall of 2013. However, this was not the path she thought she would take.

Originally applying to be a customer service associate, Wintringer found herself with the offer to be an intern in the Warhawk Connection Center. In looking at this opportunity, she felt that it was an area that she did not have a lot of experience in, however, was one that she could grow and develop from.

Throughout her time in the Warhawk Connection Center, Wintringer has appreciated all of the people that she has met and worked with.

“I have absolutely loved my time in the Warhawk Connection Center,” Wintringer stated. “I have been mentored and advised by wonderful professionals throughout my time here who have really helped me develop into the open-minded and professional that I am today. My skills have been fine-tuned in so many ways.”

Wintringer’s time in C&LD will follow her through her next endeavor. After graduation, Wintringer is going to be moving to Massachusetts to pursue her master’s degree in higher education administration and working in their housing department as a first year resident educator at the University of Massachusetts – Lowell.

After learning and growing here at UW-Whitewater, she is excited to see where this new journey takes her and what new experiences she will have and the lessons she will learn.

Take advantage of the opportunities around you and keep an open mind,” Wintringer noted. “You never know when you’re going to find your passion.”

Searching for Jobs

Looking for jobs is sometimes the most difficult part of the job process. Where do you start? What sites are the best? Are there different websites I should use depending on my major? These are all questions that come to mind when starting my search for a job.

There are hundreds of different websites out there that post jobs. How do you know which one is going to give you the best results and help you find the job in the quickest, simplest way?

Here at UW-Whitewater, we have a great resource to help us find jobs. HawkJobs is a great website for current students and alumni to find jobs and internships. You can filter through positions by inputting your major, desired job location, and what type of job you’re looking for. From there it tells you exactly how you apply for that job.

Hawkjobs is a great resource to help you start your search for a job. However, HawkJobs only has postings from the employers who know about HawkJobs. This sometimes leaves out a few popular areas of study.

If you are a person who is interested in a career in advertising, communications, graphic design, marketing, public relations, social media, or web design, BigShoesNetwork.com is a great place to search for jobs. There are two different regions that Big Shoes Network offers postings in, the Midwest and the South.

Once you choose which region you would like to work in, you go to the find a job tab. This page allows you to choose what region you would like to work in and the type of position that you are interested in. Once you see a position that catches your eye, you can simply click on it and it tells you exactly how to apply.

On the other hand, if you are looking for a job with the government, USAjobs.gov is the place that you want to go. Here you can search for all different types of positions with the government. You can narrow your search down by the location you want to be in, the type of position you would like to have, and even the government agency that you would like to work for.

If your dream job is working for your favorite sports team, then you should go to teamworkonline.com. On this website you can search for jobs by the team that you would like to work for. They have all different types of positions, from ticket sales to marketing. You can even narrow your search down to entry-level positions.


Finally, if you are someone who is in the social services field, socialservice.com is a great website for you. This website offers a variety of positions in the social services field from child care workers to case managers. You can narrow your search by what type of degree is required and by location.


When choosing which site is going to be best for you, make sure that you consider what field you want to go in. While you may still be unsure, it always helps to narrow down your options even a little bit.

Keep in mind that this job search process is one that is going to take a lot of time. There are a lot of open positions out there and you want to make sure that you are applying for the ones that you want.

Remember that employers don’t always post all of their jobs online. It is still very important to build up a network of contacts that you can talk to about possible job openings. Networking in person is just as important as networking online.

HawkJobs, Big Shoes Network, USAjobs, teamworkonline, and socialservices.com are all great sites for you to start your job search. They are easy to use and each one provides something unique in your search for a job.

Passion Drives Motivation: Kate Winkler Named March Intern of the Month

Kate Winkler knew there was something missing from her marketing major when she entered the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.

It was not until the second semester of her freshman year when she was enrolled in Biology 120, that she discovered what she wanted to study for the duration of her undergraduate collegiate career.

“I’ve always been proficient in science and wanted to take more science courses after that semester,” Winkler said. “After speaking with my adviser, I switched majors and began the path that has brought me to where I am now.”

Winkler, a senior integrated science and business major from Kewaskum, Wis., was awarded the Intern of the Month honor for the month of March. Her marketing internship started in July of 2014 at Spacesaver Corporation.

Spacesaver is an innovator in storage, offering solutions to make every aspect of a business run more efficiently.

A former supervisor from her time as a market researcher for the Wisconsin Innovation Service Center (WISC) contacted Winkler about the internship at Spacesaver.

“While I only completed one project under her direction, she thought that my constant drive for knowledge and diligent work ethic would be a great fit at the company,” Winkler said. “After doing my research on the corporation, I too, knew it would be a great fit for me.”

During her time at Spacesaver, Winkler has created market briefs about different industries, conducted online surveys and phone interviews to gauge the preferences of their audience and collaborated with the marketing team to develop user-friendly product pages.

Winkler is also working to improve Spacesaver’s social media strategy and search engine optimization strategy. This includes working with social media outlets to increase audience engagement and research key words to incorporate into the company’s content.

“What intrigued me about the position at Spacesaver was the fact that I would be able to constantly collaborate with the whole marketing team,” Winkler said. “Most of my market research projects that I had completed at WISC were very individually driven projects and while I can work efficiently on my own, I think that the best work comes out of a team effort.”

Another big part of Winkler’s internship is communicating with several different people, in order to work more efficiently and know the product better.

This has proven to be initially difficult, but has produced substantial benefits, Winkler notes.

“What I had thought were strengths before are even stronger strengths now because the marketing team at Spacesaver has pushed my boundaries,” Winkler said. “Spacesaver has taught me that a job can be fun, yet scary. I have learned that it is okay to take a risk and fail, just as long as you learn and grow from it.

Outside of work experience, Winkler is currently the captain of the UW-Whitewater Women’s Golf Team and has been a member for the past four years.

Golf is individual and team-based at the same time and truly showcases an individual’s work ethic, according to Winkler.

“I came to UW-Whitewater to play golf, but I have found so much more than that,” Winkler said. “I think UW-Whitewater does a tremendous job at giving students all that they need to succeed and pushing students to be their ultimate best, both in the classroom and outside.”

After graduation, Winkler wants to continue working in marketing for a water business. Until then, she will continue to learn and grow as a working professional.

“Take advantage of all opportunities and soak it all in,” Winkler said. “Learn as much as you can and apply it. Push past what you know and try something new. Collaborate and share your ideas. But most of all take advantage of these opportunities and absorb as much as you can while the chance is in your hands.”

 Apply to be our next Intern of the Month and share your story! 

Building Your Experience: One Bullet Point at A Time

“Please attach your resume to the application.”

These words appear on every job application. Everyone always tells you to make sure that your resume stands out against the other candidates. How am I supposed to make sure that mine is different from all the rest? What are the important things that I need to include on it? These are all questions that come to mind when writing a resume.

I have read plenty of articles giving me all sorts of resume tips. I have been in classes where creating a resume was an assignment. How was I going to make sure that mine stood out?

I start from the top. Name, contact information, and education. Your name is important, so I make mine a little bit of a bigger font than the rest of my resume. I include my address, phone number, and email so that when the employer reads my amazing resume they knew how to get ahold of me. I put my school name, my major, expected graduation date, so the employer knows that I have the education background for the job that I want. This section wasn’t too bad.

In the related work section I make sure that I bold all of my position titles, places of employment, and the dates that I was there. This way, when the employer is scanning my resume they can quickly see the titles and then read on if they are interested. In the sub-points for each job, I describe what I did, always starting with a verb (this website has a great list of verbs that make your resume more powerful https://www.themuse.com/advice/185-powerful-verbs-that-will-make-your-resume-awesome.) If I currently hold the position, the verb is in the present tense, if it was a past position, the verb was in the past tense. I put my experience in chronological order. You can choose to do it this way or you can order the positions by relevancy.

2Throughout college I have been involved in many different student organizations. My resume was a perfect place to show all of the relevant skills and experiences I have gained through those. This section is formatted just like the related experience section except instead of them being employment related, they are leadership and professional organization related.

The final step in my journey to make my resume one that would stand out to employers and land me that job is to get feedback. My family is happy to help, my friends are almost as happy, but I will have to read a couple of their resumes too. I will also take it to one of Career & Leaderships Resume Doctors so that I could get a more professional opinion on it as well.

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After talking with these different people I also got some advice on what not to put on my resume. The two most important pieces of advice I received was to make sure that I did not have any spelling, grammatical or punctuation errors on my resume and that my resume was not more than one page long. These mistakes could take me one step back in my goal to look professional. Another piece of advice was to make sure that I am using an easy to read format so that the employer could easily follow my experience and skills and relate them back to the job. Finally, they told me to make sure that I am highlighting that I have the required skills and experience for the job. I can do this by taking out experiences that aren’t as relevant and elaborating a little bit more on what was.

A resume is never completed. With every new job and every new experience there is something to add. As time goes on there will be things that are no longer relevant. However, now after going through my resume and making sure that the basic layout is good, I feel a lot better about attaching my resume to the job application and sending it out to future employers.

5Note: It is not recommended to send out massive quantities of your resume unless it is tailored to each specific position.

Career & Leadership Development is a great place to get your resume reviewed no matter what field you are in! Call (262) 472-1471 to make an appointment today!

The Road to Productivity: Exploring How Warhawks Persevere and Prevail

“There will be obstacles. There will be doubters. There will be mistakes, but with hard work there are no limits!” –Anonymous 

It’s that time of the year again when workloads outweigh energy levels! Winter is quickly approaching and finals are right around the corner for us Warhawks. During this time of year it’s easy to become stressed out, burnt out, or just down right depressed from the amount of work you have to complete.  So in an effort to alleviate some of that stress, here’s what a few fellow Warhawks from Career and Leadership Development had to say about how they stay productive during late semester chaos:

Lisa Helms: PRIDE Intern

“With school it is a little harder for me to stay focused but I usually pull things together at the last minute. However with work, I stay focused by making to do lists when I get into the office. I start by checking my email to see if there’s someone that I need to communicate with right away and I just take it one step at a time.”

Cherish Golden: PRIDE Intern

“ I usually go to the library and sit at a table in a quite area to stay focused on academics. I don’t get on the computers because then I’d be distracted.  At work, when I’m all out of tasks, I just find little stuff to do to stay busy. Even if it’s just fixing the chairs, I have to stay busy and remain on my feet in order to be productive. “

Radaya Ellis: Biology Major

“Well I have a productive playlist that I listen to when its grind time to get me back focused. Artist on my productive play list include artist such as Lil Boosie, to help motivate me, and Kirk Franklin, to uplift me. Listening to artist along those parameters helps keep me motivated both in work and at school. “

Katie Barbour: Involvement Office Graduate Assistant

 “A lot of times around the end of the semester I have a lot of big projects to do. So for me this semester I have two large group papers, as well as projects in two different classes. So at this point, it’s really a matter of working effectively with my group members and trying to be a leader within those two groups to make sure we get things done. Especially since finals are right before graduation and that’s when those things are due, and frankly I don’t want to be overwhelmed with group projects that late in the semester. So I think just being proactive and making sure you get things done ahead of time really helps relieve some of the stress”

Becky Wintringer: Warhawk Connection Center Intern

Becky Wintringer

“To-Do Lists are a big thing for me. I have post-its and color coded notes and stuff all over the place. I use my calendar to color code everything! Blue things are for class, green things are for work, and purple things are for organizations. I just try to stay managed by plotting out certain times of the day for individual things so that I’m not just doing all homework for three hours but individual tasks during individual times.

Anthony Richardson: Seal Entertainment Intern

Anthony Richardson

“In order to stay productive I pretty much just remind myself of why I’m here and I use that as motivation to assure that I persevere throughout the rest of the semester.”

We hope these tips can help you achieve your fullest potential and maximize your productivity during stressful times. Be sure to finish up this semester strong and don’t be afraid to join the dialog. What are some strategies that you live by to manage  stressful times and remain productive? Comment and share your ideas.

5 Career Lessons from Mean Girls

Today marks the tenth anniversary of the iconic movie, Mean Girls. In addition to having the most quotable script of all time, Mean Girls also offers a lot of career takeaways! This list is “so fetch” so you better keep reading.

1. Don’t get an ego

Cady’s ultimate downfall is that she starts thinking she is all that and a bag of Regina’s low cal chips. She gets caught up on getting to the top of the social pyramid, which ultimately causes her to flunk calculus, lose her BFFs, and get grounded.

Whether you’re on the job hunt, interviewing, or just starting out your career, don’t let your ego get to your head. Humility is key; no one likes a conceited employee who thinks they’re better than everyone else.

2. Nothing good comes from cliques

Cady’s school is full of cliques: the plastics, the JV jocks, desperate wannabes, burnouts, etc., and it’s the presence of these cliques that turns everyone against each other in the end.

When you’re at your job, avoid joining the office clique. It’s important to create an inclusive, not exclusive, work environment where everyone feels comfortable being themselves. If you work your way into an office clique, people may be afraid to approach you and you can miss out on some awesome opportunities.

3. Accept help

Cady, Janis, and Damian all work together to take down Regina George, and it works! *Spoiler alert* Regina ends up getting hit by a bus, loses her position as queen bee, and becomes an athlete instead. There’s no way Cady, Janis, or Damian could have stripped Regina from her power without one another.

Similarly, there’s no way you’ll get an interview, job, or promoted without people’s help. Whether it’s using your connections, or asking a friend to proofread your resume, put your pride aside and accept their help.

4. Brains are an asset

Cady is introduced as a super smart calculus wizard, but she dumbs herself down to get a guy *ew.* By playing dumb, Cady eventually loses her crush’s affection, and fails her calc test. It isn’t until she accepts her math abilities, and joins the mathletes that she realizes all of mistakes she’s made that year.

Realize and capitalize on your strengths. Never dumb yourself down to spare your supervisor’s or coworker’s feelings, instead take the opportunity to teach them what you know!

5. Take responsibility for your actions

At the end of the movie, Cady takes responsibility for writing the Burn Book (a book that has a bunch of mean things about all the girls in her class). Even though Cady only wrote one page of the lengthy book, she still took the blame for all of it.

We will all make mistakes at work, but it’s important that you make sure to take responsibility for them. Admitting you did something something wrong on your own (rather than your supervisor finding out) shows really good character and will help you in the long run.