Brittany Meister – Sarah

Name: Brittany Ann Meister

Principle Role: Sarah

Year at UW-Whitewater: Senior

Major: Theatre Performance

 

What is your favorite part of working on Muskie Love?

The show is so fun. I see a lot of my own family in the characters.

What is your characters connection with the other characters?

Sarah is Roy’s daughter and Bea’s cousin. She is also Claude’s love interest and DNR Doug’s subject of affection.

Did you have to do any research for your character?

Sarah grew up fishing and loving the Packers and is close to her dad. It’s my childhood in a nutshell!

What are the easy parts about working in the round? Difficult parts?

The easy part about working in the round simultaneously is the hardest part. Normally, in a proscenium setting, you have to adjust your body and movements to almost always be facing the audience. In the round, the audience is all around you, so you can’t always be facing all of them. It takes away the concern of having to “do things with an upstage hand instead” but adds in a new factor of playing things so that the most people can see it.

What is your favorite song to sing from the show? Is it catchy?

I love “Motorboat” because of the way the melody “walks up the stairs” with the other vocals. Each character has their own moment in contemplating love during the song. It’s almost dreamlike at times, but some of the character’s emotions get the better of them and they just have to burst out.

If this production were on Broadway, would you be able to do it 6 – 7 days a week? Explain why or why not. 

I think I would be able to do this show six or seven days a week. It’s fun and lighthearted without anything physically straining like backflips.

Why should people come see the production?

Muskie Love is really lighthearted and fun. People from Wisconsin are serious about their Packers and their customs, so anyone who has even spent a little bit of time here can appreciate the characters and the jokes in this show.

 photo IMG_20140625_194033380_zps0d71f3c3.jpgChris James (Roy) & Brittany Meister (Sarah) rehearsing a scene.
Photo courtesy of Allison Lozar.

July 15 – 19 at 7:30pm and July 20 at 2:00pm on the Barnett Theatre stage, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform Dave Hudson and Paul Libman’s Muskie Love. Interested in seeing the show? Head to www.tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 and buy your tickets today!

Benjamin Treinen – Claude

Name: Benjamin Treinen

Principle Role: Claude

Year at UW-Whitewater: Sophomore

Major: Marine / Freshwater Ecology

 

What is your favorite part of working on Muskie Love?

My favorite part about working on the show is working with the people that I work with. It seems that no matter how bad or how long my day has been, when I start rehearsal with my cast mates, I can guarantee that we will have a lot of fun and I will leave rehearsal with a smile on my face.

What is your characters connection with the other characters?

My character is Ben’s assistant for his fishing guides’ experiences, as well as being Sarah’s love interest.

Did you have to do any research for your character?

The only research I had to do was basic fishing terminology and techniques.

What are the easy parts about working in the round? Difficult parts?

The answer that I could give for both being easy and difficult would be the spacing. The spacing of the stage acts like a double-edged sword, it allows us to tell more of the story using a smaller space, making it feel more intimate. But with that being said, the size of the set pieces and props that can be used is limited because of the spacing issues.

What is your favorite song to sing from the show? Is it catchy?

My favorite song would have to be “Prayer for the Packers,” because it is done a capella, barbershop quartet style, which in itself is difficult. Its also very funny because it shows the audience how dedicated some fans truly are to their favorite team, whether it be in football, baseball, or any other sport.

If this production were on Broadway, would you be able to do it 6 – 7 days a week? Explain why or why not.

I feel that I would be able to do it, and that would be because there is always something that grasps the audience’s attention, like Ben and Bea’s love hate relationship, or Claude’s never ending rivalry with DNR Doug, it has something for everyone. And the show itself is just under an hour and a half long, so it would not be as physically exhausting as other shows.

Why should people come see the production?

People should come see this show because it’s a show that not many people have seen, let alone having heard about it. In addition, it’s a show about us, about Wisconsin as a state, where our deep love for the Packers, fishing, exciting love stories, and, yes, even the DNR all meld into one perfect production that sums up every stereotype that is given to Wisconsin.

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                      Ben Treinen (Claude) & Brittany Meister (Sarah) rehearsing a scene.

Photo courtesy of Allison Lozar.

July 15 – 19 at 7:30pm and July 20 at 2:00pm on the Barnett Theatre stage, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform Dave Hudson and Paul Libman’s Muskie Love. Interested in seeing the show? Head to www.tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 and buy your tickets today!

Colton Larsen – Ben

Name: Colton Larsen

Principle Role: Ben

Year at UW-Whitewater: Junior

Major: BFA Theatre Management/Promotions

 

What is your favorite part of working on Muskie Love?

My favorite aspect of working on this show is working with this fantastic group of actors!

What is your characters connection with the other characters?

I am (secretly) in love with Bea. Claude is my new fishing assistant.

Did you have to do any research for your character?

I had to research some fishing terms. That is a world completely unfamiliar to me!

What are the easy parts about working in the round? Difficult parts?

We actually get to act face to face with each other! I always forget that audience members are staring at my back.

What is your favorite song to sing from the show? Is it catchy?

My favorite song to sing is “With All of My Heart.” It’s always stuck in my head!

If this production were on Broadway, would you be able to do it 6 – 7 days a week? Explain why or why not.

I would be able to! I love working this show with these great people!

Why should people come see the production?

It’s fun, hilarious and heartwarming. The music is great!

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Figure 1 Colton Larsen (Ben), LeAnn Vance (Bea), Ben Treinen (Claude) & Brittany Meister (Sarah) rehearsing a scene.

Photo courtesy of Allison Lozar.

July 15 – 19 at 7:30pm and July 20 at 2:00pm on the Barnett Theatre stage, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform Dave Hudson and Paul Libman’s Muskie Love. Interested in seeing the show? Head to www.tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 and buy your tickets today!

 

Allison Lozar – Stage Manager

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Name: Allison Lozar

Role: Stage Manager, Props Master

Year at UW-Whitewater: Sophomore

Major: Theatre emphasis Stage Management

 

What is your favorite part of working on Muskie Love?

My favorite part of working on Muskie Love is working in the round. I’ve seen shows in the round before and always thought that it was cool. Now I get to actually work in it. My other favorite part is working with the cast. They are nice and helpful and it is a joy to be stage managing a show for them.

What have you found as a challenge while working in the round?

The size of the stage. It is small and having seven foot wide platforms makes for a smaller playing area in the center for the boat to move around in. Also blocking notes are different as there isn’t an upstage or downstage or stage left or stage right. Also props have to look much more realistic as the audience is right there and can if something is real or not.

Have you learned anything in the classroom that has helped you with these challenges?

I have learned how to build stuff and safely use power tools in Intro to Tech which has helped with building props. Otherwise I haven’t taken many classes yet.

What is your favorite song to sing from the show? Is it catchy?

All of the songs are pretty catchy as they each have their own melody and tune that is heard a lot in rehearsals. I don’t really have a favorite song but the one I end up singing the most is “Prayer for the Packers.”

Anything else you would like to share?

I’m a Bears fan so doing a show that greatly involves the Packers is interesting and different.

July 15 – 19 at 7:30pm and July 20 at 2:00pm on the Barnett Theatre stage, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform Dave Hudson and Paul Libman’s Muskie Love. Interested in seeing the show? Head to www.tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 and buy your tickets today!

The Bunbury Twins – Helga ten Dorp

You may have heard of

Mary-Kate and Ashley Olson,

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Dylan and Cole Sprouse,
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James and Oliver Phelps,
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But today we focus your attention on UW-Whitewater’s very own twin actresses, Bridgett Bunbury & Casey Lee Bunbury.

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Who knows; they might be performing the same part on the same night, or different nights. Come and see the production to find out what happens!

Name: Bridgett Bunbury

Role: Helga ten Dorp

Major: BFA Performance

Year in school: Junior

 

What is your favorite part of working on DEATHTRAP?

My favorite part is that I get to work with my twin, Casey Bunbury, because we rarely get to act together but since our part was double cast we are working together as the same character.

How is it different performing in the round? Do you have a preference?

The difference in working in the round is that you don’t have to worry about your back being towards the audience because no matter where you are your back will be towards one section of the audience during the play. I don’t have a preference.

What is your characters connection with the other characters?

Helga ten Dorp is psychic and can see what is going to happen to the characters in the play. She comes and warns them about the feelings she has and what will happen to them if they don’t take her warnings.

Could you see yourself has your character in real life? And why?

No, because I’m not Dutch and I am not psychic.

Why should people go see the production?

People should come see this production because it has everything you want in a play. It has love, death, comedy, a Dutch woman who is psychic, weapons, and blood. The best part is that’s only in act 1! This show has everything you would want to see.

Anything else you’d like to share?

“I see theater! Inside, much applause! Outside, long line of ticket-buyers.” – Helga ten Dorp.

 

Name: Casey Lee Bunbury

Role: Helga ten Dorp

Major: BFA Performance

Year in school: Junior

 

What is your favorite part of working on DEATHTRAP

This is my first time getting to work with my twin, Bridgett Bunbury, in a show and we are double casted together as the same character, so it is really fun watching us perform this character.

How is it different performing in the round? Do you have a preference?

With performing in the round the audiences gets to see everything that is going on from all different angles of the theatre. No I do not have a preference, performing in any space is always interesting.

What is your characters connection with the other characters?

My character is staying in the neighbors’ house and comes in and out of the Bruhl’s household with certain messages. She is psychic and is resting from helping police in previous investigations in her hometown.

Could you see yourself has your character in real life? And why?

If I had all the psychic abilities as her and I was Dutch then yes. However a characteristic Helga and I share is that we both want to help people when they are in trouble and Helga always warns people of her psychic messages.

Why should people go see the production?

This play has it all! Love, lust, comedy, betrayal, fighting, psychic visions and more! This is a play you won’t want to miss!

Anything else you’d like to share?

“Ja, ja, I see theater! Inside, much applause! Outside, long line of ticket-buyers, shivering in cold!” – Helga ten Dorp.


On June 24 – 28 at 7:30pm on the Barnett Theatre stage, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform Ira Levin’s DEATHTRAP. Over the next couple of weeks we will feature cast and production members on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to
www.tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 and buy your tickets today!

Eric Appleton: Scenic Designer

Everyone is on the Barnett Theatre stage this summer! Hicklin Studio Theatre is being renovated with updated furniture and technology, check out the blog, http://bit.ly/hicklin-and-barnett-theatre-improvements , for more information.

 

We present the man behind the – “look” of the play . . .

Name:  Eric Appleton

Role: Set Designer

Position at UWW: Assistant Professor

 

What kind of research have you done to create DEATHTRAP?   What is the challenge of working in theatre in the round?  

 

These two questions really link together on this show. Deathtrap is a very prop heavy show, and for many of the plot twists to work, you really have to figure out ahead of time what items will be where and how actors are going to get them.  In the round, that means you have no walls to hang anything on, no easy places to put doors or light switches, and no place to put tall pieces of furniture.  It really means you have to think even harder about how the stage is going to work, so really have to comb through the script and pay attention to every little detail.

 

More broadly, the play takes place in a room that’s in a converted barn — it’s not a generic house, but one that’s been created by the characters to fit their particular tastes.  The main character is a collector, and the room has to be full of things that he has collected not only throughout his career, but items in general that he has liked and added.  In the round, since you can’t have much in the way of walls, the room really has to be expressed through the items in it.  Oh, and the playwright calls for a staircase, and there’s important action that takes place on it.  So we have to figure out how to have a staircase as well . . .

 

For more information about Eric Appleton and his designs check out his blog http://blogs.uww.edu/appletoneric/.

 

On June 24 – 28 at 7:30pm on the Barnett Theatre stage, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform Ira Levin’s DEATHTRAP. Over the next couple of weeks we will feature cast and production members on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to www.tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your tickets today!

 

Eric Appleton's DEATHTRAP Rendering photo EricDeathtrapRendering_zps0a43c38e.jpg

Scenic Designer Eric Appleton’s Finished DEATHTRAP Rendering.
Image courtesy of Eric Appleton’s blog.

Charles “Skip” Grover: Director

On June 24 – 28 at 7:30pm on the Barnett Theatre stage, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform Ira Levin’s DEATHTRAP. Over the next couple of weeks we will feature cast and production members on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to www.tickets.uww.edu  or call 262-472-2222 to buy your tickets today!

 

Today we focus on director, Charles “Skip” Grover.

Name:  Charles “Skip” Grover

Role:  Director

Position at UW-Whitewater:  Associate Professor, Theatre/Dance Department

What is your favorite part of working on DEATHTRAP?  The rehearsals!!

What kind of research have you done to create DEATHTRAP?  I have directed this play once before (1999) so my research has largely been brushing up on the 70’s — especially  names of people  mentioned in the play

What is a challenge with working in the round?  I enjoy directing productions in the round.  The biggest challenge for a director is positioning the actors in such a way that audience can see them clearly

What have you learned from this experience?  How to adapt.  Normally we would be working in the Hicklin, which would provide a slightly larger space

Anything else you’d like to share?  This is my 40th consecutive summer to direct in Summeround, and   I have had many wonderful experiences working in this environment with  all the different actors  and design teams.

 

The Summeround Series History

Summeround Theatre has been a Whitewater tradition for over 30 years. 1973 marks the first year that the Theatre/Dance Department’s productions were first held indoors in what is now known as the Hicklin Studio Theatre. Prior to 1973, the department produced their summer theatre outdoors in a large tent. In 1973, before the season opened a severe storm shredded the tent and the season was moved indoors. The summer tradition continued in the round in the Hicklin Studio Theatre, eventually named The Summeround Series.

Everyone’s on stage this summer, even the audience, when the Summeround Theatre moves to the stage of the Barnett Theatre. Hicklin Studio Theatre is currently being renovated, so this summer marks the first time The Summeround Series will take place in the Barnett Theatre.

A complete description of the renovation can be found on the College of Arts and Communication blog: http://blogs.uww.edu/artsandcommunication/2014/03/04/hicklin-and-barnett-theatre-improvements/

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Cory Jefferson Hagen & Brittany Meister: Romeo & Juliet

On April 29 – May 3 at 7:30pm in Barnett Theatre, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform William Shakespeare’s classic, Romeo & Juliet with a new twist, steampunk. Over the month of April we will be featuring cast and crew members each week on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today!

Today we focus on actors, Cory Jefferson Hagen & Brittany Meister

Name: Cory Jefferson Hagen

Role: Romeo

Major: Theatre Performance

Year in school: Senior

Favorite part of working on R&J: This show is just so very detailed. The amount of time and effort we all pour into every facet of the show only strengthens it. I’ve enjoyed every aspect, from the study of the language, the fighting, the dancing… it’s just all so involved and intricate that I’ve adored every minute of it.

Most difficult part of working on R&J: I don’t really like to say that anything is difficult. Of course there are times where you don’t exactly do something right the first try but you just go back and do it again and get yourself where you need to be. The only thing that really presents itself as a challenge is staying caught up with your school work, work, and the work on the show, you have multiple things happening at once and you have to give all of it your all.

What have you learned from this experience: Seeing as this show is my senior project I’ve devoted myself to it. I’m learning things about who I am as a performer and as a person. My appreciation for Shakespeare’s work has only grown and I’ve fully realized that his work is something I enjoy working on and something I want to continue to work on throughout my life.

Why should people go see the show: Shakespeare is timeless. The things he wrote speak to us as an audience and as a performer today the same way they spoke to an audience when they were written. It also helps that our show is fresh and sexy.

Anything else you’d like to share? This show is a culmination of an entire semester of work. Everyone has poured everything they have into it, and would all be thrilled to have a packed house to perform to.

 

 
Name: Brittany Ann Meister

Role: Juliet

Major: B.A. Theatre Performance

Year in school: Senior

Favorite part of working on R&J: This production is being brought together by so many people with a variety of great talents. It’s a great feeling to do your own work on your own piece of the puzzle and see it fit in with everyone else’s. Props, the set, costumes, stage management, directors, fight and dance choreography, and the actors are bringing their work together and each night it gets better and better.

Most difficult part of working on R&J: There are a lot of technicalities that should be observed in speaking what Shakespeare has written for us. It’s not the language itself but how it hits the ear. In Shakespeare, it’s also important to be sure that the words are heard in the audience, so some of the most difficult things to correct are natural speech tendencies and patterns that can muddle the language.

What have you learned from this experience: I’ve grown a lot as an actor while working on this show. I have learned how to let go of something that may not have gone quite as well as I wanted it to, and to instead put that energy into figuring out how it could be improved. I’ve also learned a lot about working with a director one on one, communicating ideas, and how to take an idea and experiment with it.

Why should people go see the show: Everyone thinks they know all about Romeo and Juliet, but the saying, “it’s all fun and games until someone loses an eye,” rings true here. It’s a comedy until someone dies. This show has love, fighting, blood, dancing, and it’s all in steampunk style. It’s amazing and you won’t want to miss it!

Want to see what Cory & Brittany are talking about? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today! Stop by the Theatre/Dance website for more information or check us out on Facebook

Keri Ryan: Properties Mistress

 

On April 29 – May 3 at 7:30pm in Barnett Theatre, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform William Shakespeare’s classic, Romeo & Juliet with a new twist, steampunk. Over the month of April we will be featuring cast and crew members each week on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today!

Today we focus on properties mistress, Keri Ryan.

Keri

Name: Keri Ryan

Role: Properties Mistress, Assistant Stage Manager

Major: BFA Stage Management

Year in school: Senior

Favorite part of working on R&J: My favorite part would have to be testing my creativity while constructing some of these props. Due to the decided steampunk theme, I have been allowed to toy with rather fanciful ideas and obscure designs.

Most difficult part of working on R&J: Getting things to light up. Literally. Most of my props consist of some form of light, and lights tend to be delicate. Throw in the nature of a show and you have a recipe for broken props.

What have you learned from this experience: I learned that the quote “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work” – Thomas Edison, is entirely accurate. But seriously, it’s worth it to keep at a difficult project. Usually that becomes the one you are most proud of.

Why should people go see the show: It’s a damn good show. Even to this day, seeing this show 70 times over I am continuously amazed. The actors are wonderful and enthralling, the directing phenomenal, the lights are stunning, costumes are gorgeous, the set is breathtaking, the sound is supportive, and the props are alright I suppose. While my accolades may seem over-the-top, I say all of this in honesty. This show takes my breath away.

Want to see what Keri is talking about? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today! Stop by the Theatre/Dance website for more information or check us out on Facebook