Peter Brian Kelly: Tybalt

On April 29 – May 3 at 7:30pm in Barnett Theatre, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform William Shakespeare’s classic, Romeo & Juliet with a new twist, steampunk. Over the month of April we will be featuring cast and crew members each week on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today!

Today we focus on actor, Peter Brian Kelly.

Name: Peter Brian Kelly

Role: Tybalt Capulet

Major: Theatre Performance BFA; General Management BBA.

Year in school: 5th Year Senior

Favorite part of working on R&J: I have immensely enjoyed playing the edgy, sensual, and volatile character of Tybalt. It has offered me the opportunity to step outside of my own comfort zone and perform a character that is incredibly arrogant and violent while possessing that certain dangerous charm.
Working on the stage combat within this show has been a very educational and rewarding experience. I have always wanted to work more with stage weapons such as rapier and dagger and, of course, Romeo and Juliet has given me that challenge. The fights are challenging and require a lot of time and effort, but Ryan Schabach has made the experience very chill and stress-free while stressing safety and precision.

Most difficult part of working on R&J: With any university production, there is a difficulty when handling the time commitment required for rehearsals in addition to course work, jobs, student organizations, and “free-time”. Romeo and Juliet is such an epic production that it requires even more time and effort. This is especially true when considering the stage combat, dancing, and emphasis on the importance of Shakespeare’s words.

Many students may be unaware of this, but performing in a show like Romeo and Juliet requires an average 19-23 hours per week for rehearsal. That’s a whole other part time job! Add that to the various schedule commitments for class, work, student organizations, homework and other theatrical projects (i.e. Directing Scenes, DanceScapes, Emerging Choreographer’s Concert, and required production hours) and it will certainly be an intense semester!

What have you learned from this experience: From portraying Tybalt, I have learned a lot about my own movement as an actor and have developed a more physical character than I’ve ever played before.

This production has also reminded me of the importance of being creative and taking risks in order to develop a character and a production as whole. By being fearless and making clear decisions, you can add something fascinating to the show that make it more engaging to the audience.

Why should people go see the show: This is Romeo and Juliet like you have never seen it before! The steam punk design concepts displayed through the set, costumes, props, sound and lighting make this show very engaging. The acting, dancing, and stage combat make this a captivating production that audiences will not want to miss!

Anything else you’d like to share?: This is my eighteenth and final full-length production at UW-Whitewater, and it is one of the most stylistically fascinating and challenging shows I’ve done. There is an immense amount of work that has been put into this show by many people and I believe it the performances will pay off enormously and be one of most memorable recent productions of the Theatre/Dance Department.

Want to see what Peter is talking about? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today! Stop by the Theatre/Dance website for more information or check us out on Facebook

Marshall Anderson: Costume Designer

On April 29 – May 3 at 7:30pm in Barnett Theatre, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform William Shakespeare’s classic, Romeo & Juliet with a new twist, steampunk. Over the month of April we will be featuring cast and crew members each week on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today!

Today we focus on costume designer, Marshall Anderson.

Marshall Anderson

Name:  Marshall Anderson

Role:  Costume Designer

Position at UWW:  Professor of Theatre and Theatre/Dance Department Chair

Favorite part of working on R&J:  It has been fun working on a concept that blends Steampunk with the late 1800s.  It is a neat look and it has been fun mixing fabrics and textiles together to help make the story clear to the audience.

Most difficult part of working on R&J:  This is a HUGE production, that is also quite expensive.  Trying to balance the needs of our concept with our budget has been a big challenge. Also, keeping track of every character and actor involved and what they are playing in each particular scene has been interesting.

What have you learned from this experience:  I guess that I haven’t learned this from this production, but the need for clear communication and planning (way ahead of time) has come to forefront again.  I have been working solid on this production all semester, making LOTS of lists.

Why should people go see the show:  This is a classic story told in an exciting manner – with lots of fighting, music and dance, lots of neat visuals and of course, Shakespeare’s wonderful language.  It should be a wonderful couple of hours in the theatre.

Anything else you’d like to share?  The whole cast and production team have been working very hard on this all semester and the performances will be the culmination of all of this hard work and dedication!

Mirror pic      Mask

Want to see what Marshall is talking about? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today! Stop by the Theatre/Dance website for more information or check us out on Facebook

Rasell Holt & Amber Wiest: Actors

On April 29 – May 3 at 7:30pm in Barnett Theatre, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform William Shakespeare’s classic, Romeo & Juliet with a new twist, steampunk. Over the month of April we will be featuring cast and crew members each week on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today!

Today we focus on two actors, Rasell Holt and Amber Wiest.

Name: Rasell Holt

Role: Mercutio
Major: Theatre (Performance)
Year in School: Junior
Favorite part of working on R&J: All of the different aspects that our show has to offer that I believe will make our show a successful production from the dancing choreographed by T. Stacy Hicks, the fighting choreographed by Ryan Schabach, and the amazing costumes created by Marshall Anderson! It’s going to be great to see all of that come together within the next month.
Most difficult part of working on R&J: In the show we have a number of fights with rapiers and daggers. The fighting has been a lot of fun but it takes so much work to do this right and make it believable for the audience. We want to find the safest way to show them that we are in real danger. I’ve never done anything like this before so it has been quite the challenge and I think the entire cast has tackled it very well.
What have you learned from this experience: This show is a demonstration of how important working as an ensemble is. There are a lot of things going on in this show and to give the audience the best way of understanding and seeing all of it we have to work together as a single unit to tell the story.
Why should people go see the show: Romeo and Juliet IS the classic love story and the majority of us knows how it goes but THIS production will be unlike any you’ve ever seen before or will ever see!

 

Name: Amber Wiest

Role: Nurse

Major: BA Theater Performance

Minor: Art

Year in school: Junior

Favorite part of working on R&J: I’ve been so excited to explore a role that I can really sink my teeth into. When I began working on getting to know the Nurse I had no idea just how complex she actually is. I’ve never worked on a role that really dives into each emotion so honestly. The discovery into how she thinks, feels and reacts to the events around her gives me a new discovery during each rehearsal.

Most difficult part of working on R&J: My biggest challenge during the development of the Nurse is controlling her moments of extreme sadness. In past performances I’ve really worked on comedy, which I’ve become very accustomed to. When the Nurse enters on stage already in tears, I began to explore an entire new ball game of acting. I’m extremely lucky that I was introduced into these scenes under the direction of Angela Iannone. She really opened my eyes to finding emotion through breath, taking the pressure off of trying to put so much pressure within my thoughts. I really am able to recognize this production as my favorite experience yet because my biggest challenge excites me almost more than my favorite aspects of this experience.

What have you learned from this experience: I have learned that there is so much to learn as an actor honestly. Like I mentioned, I’ve mainly worked within the realm of comedy, but now have been blessed with the opportunity to grow and stretch into worlds of emotion I’ve never had the opportunity to explore. I’ve learned how to hold on to the confidence that if I give the Nurse as much dedication and hard work as I can, I will be able to tell her story as honestly as I can.

Why should people go see the show: People should come see this production because they will leave our version of Romeo and Juliet with a completely fresh idea of this timeless classic. We will literally give the audience everything you could hope for from a theatrical experience. Our goal is to completely give 115% so that our audiences will have a few hours away from their day-to-day experience living instead with us in our world of Romeo and Juliet.

Anything else you’d like to share? A huge thank you to Angela Iannoe, Jennifer Samson, T Stacy Hicks, Ryan Schabach, Marge Frey, Keri Ryan and Kathy Keiner for all of your amazing work with our cast guiding us towards the finish line. I feel ridiculously blessed to be a part of this production and will never forget a single day.

Want to see what Rasell and Amber are talking about? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today! Stop by the Theatre/Dance website for more information or check us out on Facebook

Nick Skaja: Lighting Designer

On April 29 – May 3 at 7:30pm in Barnett Theatre, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform William Shakespeare’s classic, Romeo & Juliet with a new twist, steampunk. Over the month of April we will be featuring cast and crew members each week on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today!

Today we focus on lighting designer, Nick Skaja.

Name: Nicholas Skaja

Role: Lighting Designer

Major: Theatre Design/Tech with am emphasis on Lighting

Year in school: Senior

Favorite part of working on R&J: My favorite part about Romeo and Juliet so far is that it’s given me many new opportunities. I was able to rent some moving fixtures, which is a new technology for me to work with. This has allowed me to really get creative and working with this production team has really given me the drive to push myself even harder.

Most difficult part of working on R&J: With the rotating units, every time they move to a new position I then need to obviously light that, however it becomes complicated when it rotates numerous times. Keeping track of that has proven to be somewhat of a challenge for me.

What have you learned from this experience: I learned how to adapt and not have that adaptation weaken my design. Unfortunately some parts of my design had to be cut. I initially was worried my design would suffer however there is always another option. This show has taught me how to quickly find that alternative while still maintaining my initial concept.

Why should people go see the show: There are lots of talented people involved in the show. Not to mention the cast has worked very hard to make this a Shakespeare performance that is appealing to all audiences. I truly feel this show is fun and entertaining and guarantee anyone who comes will also feel the same.

Want to see what Nick is talking about? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today! Stop by the Theatre/Dance website for more information or check us out on Facebook

Katie Krueger: Dance Captain

On April 29 – May 3 at 7:30pm in Barnett Theatre, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform William Shakespeare’s classic, Romeo & Juliet with a new twist, steampunk. Over the month of April we will be featuring cast and crew members each week on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today!

Today we focus on dance captain and actress, Katie Krueger.

Name: Katie Krueger

Role: Dance Captain, Livia (Ensemble)

Major: BBA Marketing, BFA Theatre Management/Promotions

Year in school: Junior
Favorite part of working on R&J: Working on the choreography for the “Men’s Variation” dance was a blast. It’s a showdown between the men of the two households that verges on violent conflict at times. In order to illustrate the differences between the Capulets and Montagues, each side was encouraged to create their own choreography with some guidance from the choreographer and the dance captains. It’s truly impressive what they were able to come up with and the actor involvement adds a lot to the personality of the scene.
Most difficult part of working on R&J: It’s often a challenge to keep up with schoolwork and other obligations while working on a show, and this has been no exception. R&J has had a demanding rehearsal schedule, and we’ve all had to work hard to make the show the best it can be while maintaining our grades.
What have you learned from this experience: I’ve never been in a Shakespeare production before. It’s fascinating for me to see the beautiful language come to life when it is performed. I would love to be part of more Shakespeare shows in the future.
Why should people go see the show: Our production has something for everyone. There is sword fighting, gorgeous poetry, dancing, stunning steampunk-style costumes and scenery, and a timeless love story. It’s a production that is meant to dazzle.
Anything else you’d like to share? Even if  you don’t consider yourself a Shakespeare fan, you will enjoy this production. If you think that’s not true, come see it and prove me wrong.

Want to see what Katie is talking about? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today! Stop by the Theatre/Dance website for more information or check us out on Facebook

Ryan Schabach: Fight Choreographer

On April 29 – May 3 at 7:30pm in Barnett Theatre, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform William Shakespeare’s classic, Romeo & Juliet with a new twist, steampunk. Over the month of April we will be featuring cast and crew members each week on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today!

Today we focus on fight choreographer, Ryan Schabach.

Name: Ryan Schabach

Role: Fight Choreographer

Favorite part of working on R&J: The students passion to learn. Admiring each individual’s process in studying the principals behind creating a dynamic yet safe fight, one that the audience will be engaged in yet never feel it is out of control.That is a very fine line to walk, and the actors took it seriously.

Most difficult part of working on R&J: Choreographers always wish they had more time. Time to tweak that one-tenth of a second moment,to adjust the angle of the fight, or to add a clever move. Knowing what they know now, I would like to come back and teach a semester on fighting for the stage as a way to incorporate the educational with the practical.

What have you learned from this experience: It has rekindled a desire to design more fights for the stage. My career as an actor often prohibits that skill set from being expressed on the professional side.

Why should people go see the show:Shakespeare is timeless, contemporary in many ways and elegant in others. The language is always moving to the beat of our hearts and makes us question the big topics. We see archetypes of these characters every time we turn on the news. It is beautiful to hear and exciting to watch!!!

Anything else you’d like to share?It has been said that for every second of violence on stage, there has been an hour of rehearsal and there is plenty of stage violence. The students have worked hard and spent many hours to perfect their craft. And for many, this is the first time they have held a weapon in their hand. They deserve much praise for their accomplishments.

 

Want to see what Ryan is talking about? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today! Stop by the Theatre/Dance website for more information or check us out on Facebook

Claire Kinder: Fight Captain

On April 29 – May 3 at 7:30pm in Barnett Theatre, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform William Shakespeare’s classic, Romeo & Juliet with a new twist, steampunk. Over the month of April we will be featuring cast and crew members each week on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today!

Today we focus on fight captain, Claire Kinder.

Name: Claire Kinder

Role: Diana (Girl Fighter) and Fight Captain
Major: Secondary English and Theater Education
Year in school: Junior
Favorite part of working on R&J: This is my first show here at UW- Whitewater so a lot of it has been fun.  My favorite part has to be taking  a classic Shakespearean piece and making it as engaging to watch as it is to be in it. Between the steampunk style, the epic fights and the great characters, the show has a lot to offer cast and crew alike.
Most difficult part of working on R&J: I have never had experience as a fight captain before so it has been a bit challenging to not only be responsible for learning every fight sequence on top of learning my own role. It is a lot to take on all at once, but well worth it.
What have you learned from this experience: I came into the production with basic stage combat experience and I have learned so much more, even some fight choreography. It also has been a great learning opportunity for myself as an actor to let go of my preconceived notions about Shakespearean theater and have fun with playing my role.
Why should people go see the show: It is a fantastic take on a classic work that many people are familiar with through being forced to read for school or otherwise. It is a refreshing change to those who think that Shakepeare is all men in tights and frilly language. It makes Shakespeare cool! (If you didn’t think so before that is.)
Want to see what Claire is talking about? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today! Stop by the Theatre/Dance website for more information or check us out on Facebook

Marguerite Frey: Stage Manager

On April 29 – May 3 at 7:30pm in Barnett Theatre, students from the UW-Whitewater Theatre/Dance Department will perform William Shakespeare’s classic, Romeo & Juliet with a new twist, steampunk. Over the month of April we will be featuring cast and crew members each week on our blog to allow them to share their experiences working on the show. Interested in seeing the show? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today!

Today we focus on stage manager, Marguerite Frey.

Name: Marguerite Frey

Role: Stage Manager

Major: BFA Theatre, Stage Management; minor: Arts Management

Year in school: Senior

Favorite part of working on R&J: I love all the different aspects, including acting, dancing, and fighting. They combine to make the show look really awesome. We have a professional director, dance choreographer, and fight choreographer and they are all AMAZING. As stage manager of the show, I have had the chance to work closely with the three of them and to be involved in how those elements work and intertwine, which is a lot of fun!

Most difficult part of working on R&J: The large cast. We have an amazing cast, but with 25 students, 1 professor, and 2 doubled roles in the show, things definitely get a little hectic sometimes. We also do not move into the actual performance space until three weeks before the show opens.

What have you learned from this experience: I have learned about a lot of things through stage managing this show. For instance, our rehearsal process has been a semester long process, so I have learned what it means to go into every rehearsal refreshed and ready to start a new day and how to instill that into the cast. In addition, I have also learned how to work and communicate effectively with a large cast. Lastly, this was my first and only college show with fighting, so I have also learned everything that goes into fight safety, weapons maintenance, effectively running rehearsals when weapons are involved, etc.

Why should people go see the show: Romeo and Juliet is obviously a well-known play. Most high schools read it and people may think that, because they know the story, it will be “boring.” Our show is NOT boring, it is absolutely fascinating. In the 45 rehearsals we have had so far (with a month still left to go), I can honestly say that I have never gotten bored. Once the technical aspects and breath-taking costumes are added in, the show is going to be at a whole new level of awesome. You will be left breathless with amazement, do not miss this show.

Anything else you’d like to share? COME SEE THE SHOW!!! It’s steam punk, people fight, people dance, people kiss, what is not to love?

Want to see what Marguerite is talking about? Head to tickets.uww.edu or call 262-472-2222 to buy your ticket today! Stop by the Theatre/Dance website for more information or check us out on Facebook

Lumberjacks in Love – opens in 1 week!

Lumberjacks in Love tickets are going fast – call to secure yours, right after watching this sneak peek!

Tickets can be purchased by calling 262-472-2222; Monday – Friday 9:30 am to 4:00 pm.  Be sure to purchase in advance so you can get a great deal at a local restaurant before the show.  Details about the deals can be found on our Facebook page - http://www.facebook.com/events/307559072709288/

YouTube Preview Image

Summeround – Murder in Green Meadows

Catch a glimpse before you go.  Tickets can be purchased by calling 262-472-2222; Monday – Friday 9:30 am to 4:00 pm.  Be sure to purchase in advance so you can get a great deal at a local restaurant before the show.  Details about the deals can be found on our Facebook page - http://www.facebook.com/events/307559072709288/

YouTube Preview Image